Benjamin Franklin's letter to Thomas Paine regarding "The Age of Reason"

[quote]DEAR SIR,

I have read your manuscript with some attention. By the argument it contains against a particular Providence, though you allow a general Providence, you strike at the foundations of all religion. For without the belief of a Providence, that takes cognizance of, guards, and guides, and may favor particular persons, there is no motive to worship a Deity, to fear his displeasure, or to pray for his protection. I will not enter into any discussion of your principles, though you seem to desire it. At present I shall only give you my opinion, that, though your reasonings are subtile and may prevail with some readers, you will not succeed so as to change the general sentiments of mankind on that subject, and the consequence of printing this piece will be, a great deal of odium drawn upon yourself, mischief to you, and no benefit to others. He that spits against the wind, spits in his own face.

But, were you to succeed, do you imagine any good would be done by it? You yourself may find it easy to live a virtuous life, without the assistance afforded by religion; you having a clear perception of the advantages of virtue, and the disadvantages of vice, and possessing a strength of resolution sufficient to enable you to resist common temptations. But think how great a portion of mankind consists of weak and ignorant men and women, and of inexperienced, inconsiderate youth of both sexes, who have need of the motives of religion to restrain them from vice, to support their virtue, and retain them in the practice of it till it becomes habitual, which is the great point for its security. And perhaps you are indebted to her originally, that is, to your religious education, for the habits of virtue upon which you now justly value yourself. You might easily display your excellent talents of reasoning upon a less hazardous subject, and thereby obtain a rank with our most distinguished authors. For among us it is not necessary, as among the Hottentots, that a youth, to be raised into the company of men, should prove his manhood by beating his mother.

I would advise you, therefore, not to attempt unchaining the tiger, but to burn this piece before it is seen by any other person; whereby you will save yourself a great deal of mortification by the enemies it may raise against you, and perhaps a good deal of regret and repentance. If men are so wicked with religion, what would they be if without it. I intend this letter itself as a proof of my friendship, and therefore add no professions to it; but subscribe simply yours,

B. Franklin [/quote]

What are your thoughts on this? I wonder what Franklin would say if he saw the state of America and the state of Christianity today.

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Franklin lived in a much more religious America than the one that currently exists. He probably would not have changed his views.

Honestly, I think that he makes a very good point. It takes a great deal of personal responsibility and courage to live by a moral system of your own choosing, not everyone has that.
Franklin was correct. Thomas Paine suffered greatly for the writing of this book. Word spread among the religious that he was an atheist (with a slightly different meaning than most of us ascribe to now), and although Thomas Jefferson encouraged him to come back to the U.S. and insisted that he would be treated as a homecoming hero, he was certainly not.

Paine was one who truly gave their life, their fortune, their sacred honor to his country. No good deed goes unpunished, it seems.

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