Mark Twain's "The War Prayer"

Mothers, fathers, spouses, children, family, friends, loved ones pray for a son or daughter going off to war, they wave USA flags, hold parades when they go and when they come home, dead or alive. What good is all that activity? 

It seems to me that a far better act would be to protest wars to your president, senators and representatives, join with others in ending the war and destruction. Learn the history of the conflict and hold those who make decisions to go to war to a higher standard than the stated "to bring democracy to an embattled people".

More often our prayers result in maiming and death of innocent people, "collateral damage", some would state. Ineffective and inefficient prayers only add to the destruction of ways of lives, of water, air, soils, and infrastructures. Prayers maintain and perpetuate the status quo. 

It is because individuals have a constructed god that favors one's point of view, usually a nationalistic perception. One tiny piece of land with the petty name of Gaza is being fought over now because people who are genetically closely related have different versions of god and each pray fervently to their different gods.

If there were a god, the prayer would be to have everyone flourish, crops would grow, food would be available for all, education would flourish as would health care. Water would be available to everyone, and there would be work for all.

Don't expect me to respect a person who has a god to whom he or she prays and then allows corruption, exploitation and manipulation.

Joan Denoo, July 14, 2014

 

Views: 450

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Powerful story! I like your statement, Daniel, "In reality, history is a prediction of what is to come."

"In the end, 'Honor in the Dust' is less about the freedom of the Philippines than the soul of the United States. This is the story of what happened when a powerful young country and its zealous young president were forced to face the high cost of their ambitions. There finally came a point when even Theodore Roosevelt realized that 'America’s dream of empire had passed'.”

~ Candice Millard in The New York Times Sunday Book Review.

I wonder if it is possible for we elders to look forward and imagine a preferred future, one in which the goal is not expansion or domination or exploitation, but a world of opportunity for each one to become all that his or her potential has to offer. A country with the best education, health care, craftsmanship, science, and human development. A world without hunger and disease. 

Dream on, Joan! Just more pipedreams! 

Daniel, I just noticed an arrow in the last photo. Is that your grandfather? 

It is your right to disagree, Freethinker31. If you do disagree there's nothing I can do whatsoever to make you agree with me. We are each just voicing our opinions here. Sometimes a person can see the view of another. Other times to do that and see the view you would have to be brought up from a very ealy age exactly as your counter view person was. Perhaps I could see your way better if I was exposed to everything in my lifetime that you were exposed to.

Things like the above mold who you are as a person. Things like the above once you add the timeframe and era, also mold your limited free will. Why is it "limited?" It has to remain within the bounds of timeframe and era. Obviously every person is not exposed to the same things and ideas.

I like the exchange of differences of opinions! It says something about the high caliber of thought and depth of understanding. I only wish there were not so much reading to get caught up on the history of the different factions. I suppose there is truth on both sides. What is it about USA that puts its guns into foreign wars, and bullets into innocent victims? We should have grown up enough to give up on expansionism. We are too big to govern as it is, and money governs instead of people. 

RSS

line

Update Your Membership :

Membership

line

line

Nexus on Social Media:

line

© 2017   Atheist Nexus. All rights reserved. Admin: Richard Haynes.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service