There was a peculiar letter in the local paper today from one Boyce "Coach" Honea, the "area director" of something called the Coastal Bend [Gulf Coast of South Texas] Fellowship of Christian Athletes," a letter that the editor titled "Double standards hard to understand."  The five-paragraph letter is redundant, its point being made in the opening paragraph, which reads: "I read on the Internet [sic] the other morning that HBO host Bill Maher had made an extremely vulgar and vile statement (too vulgar to print) about Tim Tebow and Jesus.  Just a couple of years ago, a radio host was fired for making a racial statement about a basketball team.  Will HBO fire Bill Maher?  Probably not."

The second paragraph noted that Tebow actually insisted and was permitted to change his jersey number to "John 3:16."  The third paragraph noted that several other athletes were ordered to NOT place scripture on eye-patches yet nobody complained of their tattoos. (N.B. There is a specific prohibition of any "marking of the skin" in the Booble's O.T.  Yes!  Here we are bad rapping tattoos just because some five to seven thousand year-old book says it is a no-no.  Tebow must have been reminding himself all through the last game he played, yet his team lost.  Just goes along with Burroughs' observation one can pray in one hand and shit in the other; see which fills up faster.  Yet the area director wrote: "Double standard!"  No kidding, with an exclamation point.

The fourth paragraph ended with the same "Double standard" exclamation point.  It compared kneeling in prayer at public schools with doing the "Moonwalk" in public schools, which begs so many questions it is hilarious.  Begin with comparing pomegranates with tangelos, throw in proper time-and-place, and add a dash of dogmatic nonsense and voila!  Double standard ("!").  Finally, the director pointed out what a great role model Tebow is, not drinking, not smoking, not using drugs, a person who is waiting on marriage to have sex, polite, hard-working, goes on missionary [read proselytizing] trips in the summer.  Founded an orphanage, and so forth.  "But because of his Christian faith some seem to hate him.  This is very hard to understand.  However, Jesus did say this would happen.  Read John 15:18-19."

Ah!, the last refuge of the believer: the Booble.  The very thing that allows them to say they believe in the first place.  Non-Believer: Why do you believe in God?  Believer: The Booble tells me so.  Non-Believer: Where does it say that?  Believer: "I am the Lord thy God.  Thou shalt have no other Gods before me."  Non-Believer: Doesn't that imply that there are a lot of gods around?  Believer: God said it and that's good enough for me.  Never mind that it makes no sense for someone to say they believe in something because a book tells them to.  Never mind that if one says "I believe in the God because the Booble says so" one has voiced the very epitome of circular reasoning.  Never mind that there isn't a shred of factual evidence that Jebus ever existed.  Never mind that God is so capricious he has Tebow praying to him all though the game but He lets the star's team lose.  An all powerful good god would not have let Tebow down that way.  Would he?

I pray, too.  I pray to Science, Reason, and Chaos.  And to the memory of Darwin, Hitchens, and Carl Sagan, and all the freethinking men and women who ever spoke out against mass delusions.

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The Xtians suffer from circular logic.  Like the picture below.

I've been to Corpus Christi visiting the coast and I know of the paper you speak of "Caller Times".

Tebow thinks that god is very interested in football games. I've never understood this myself -- both teams pray to god to win the game -- yet god "chooses" only one team to win. How do they figure that?

she picks the team with the nicest uniforms.  :)

could be that

God consults his bookie.

Right

Or as I dubbed it, Steph, the Bawler-Rhymes, the worst daily paper in the U.S.  Actually, God sanctions football games, as He knows that they are a form of sublimated alpha primate, testosterone-based violence.  Sometimes they get out of hand, though, just as in those nature films of mountain sheep ramming their horns at each other to the result that both are sometimes locked up for days.  Does anyone know anything about Tebow's upbringing and what particular sect of Christinsanity he belongs to now?

I can look it up -- let me see here.

IT just says Christianity.

 

After Tebow’s Denver Broncos lost to the Bills on Saturday, the ‘Real Time with Bill Maher’ host tweeted: “Wow, Jesus just f----- #TimTebow bad! And on Xmas Eve! Somewhere in hell Satan is tebowing, saying to Hitler ‘Hey, Buffalo’s killing them’”

The Tebow thing is pure narcissism - that the all powerful, all loving, god who made the universe, gives a flying fuck about the outcome of a football game just because a self-important player is asking for exactly that.  Here, in a world where there are sick and dying people, suffering and loss, god favors a football player.   He's so special.  

Like.  Thumb up.

Oh, the Corpus Christi Caller.

 

Well written, James.  I like the part about comparing pomegranates with tangelos.

Thanks!  Ha!  I thought, gee, what might Eve have been eating in the Garden and what might be the modern fruit: a hybrid, made possible not by result to scripture but to scientific experimentation in the realm of botany.  (Science and religion are mutually exclusive IMO.) 

People are "persecuting" Tim Tebow because they want him to stop acting like a self-righteous ninny.  Christians think he's a great role model because of all his showboating.  

Just imagine if some Muslim football player (could there be one given the "pigskin"?) were to stop and pray towards Mecca whenever he felt the call during a game.  The uproar from the holy rollers would be deafening. 

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