What is it about indoctrinating religion into a person that causes critical thinking to fossilized? Sometimes religion doesn't give the brain a chance to break in to get it running smoothly like one would do for a new engine. It seems for millions of people, religion puts a choke-hold on thinking and instead, pans out cookie cutting ideas and ethics that was handed down for thousands of years. I am not sure how I can explain this but by my own example.....sometimes I struggle critical thinking to the point that I get mental fatigue and frustrated. I can express things through using metaphors,  allegories , imagery and the likes quite easily. (These a great tools for being sarcastic without the other person being aware of it) However, were I  to write or think out the when, where, hows , why, and what  to write out a process about, say, racism or how to make a birdhouse I stumble through swamps of confusions ( see? I just did a imagery and metaphor).  Religion do use imaginations as a foothold on kids. I have all the mental pictures and ideas in my head, but putting it down on paper and make all the ideas connect smoothly is like car driving while  minding the back seat screaming kids while a cat is thumping under your car....oy vey!

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John, when I was taking courses for teacher certification I heard that the move for public education started when only white male property owners were allowed ro vote, and that it won the support of business interests when they saw that educated employees would increase their profits.

hi Tom: I am sure that's true when it came to nationalization of public education but the concept started much earlier. Definitely the first moves towards public education was targeted at while males.  

"Although formal schooling was not widely available, education was important to the early American colonists. Quickly realizing that simply teaching children to read and write at home and in church was insufficient, colonists began to establish public schools in the early 1600s, with the founding of the Boston Latin School in 1635. By the time of the American Revolution, some other colonies, like Georgia, were at least partially funding public grammar schools."

http://www.educationnews.org/education-policy-and-politics/american...

It would seem as though education becomes inconvenient when it empowers the average Joe to remove the wool which those with their hands on the controls have pulled over his eyes.

OOPS!

Without education, we are in a horrible and deadly danger of taking educated people seriously.

--G.K. Chesterton

Yeah, JFK's so-called "best and brightest" swallowed the falling dominoes theory for war in Viet Nam.

Post-war (~1978) news told of Chevron negotiating for oil-drilling rights in the Tonkin Gulf with Red China. That damn war was about oil.
@Thomas,
"I can express things through using metaphors, allegories, imagery and the likes quite easily."

If you're not doing poetry, who or what turned you against it?

Good question, Tom. As for me, I never could get the rhythm; except for Ozymandias by Shelley. For some reason, reading the poem moved me to tears. "Look on ye works, ye mighty, and despair". 

Ozymandias

I met a traveller from an antique land 
Who said: “Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
Stand in the desert . . . Near them, on the sand,
Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown,
And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command,
Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,
The hand that mocked them, and the heart that fed:
And on the pedestal these words appear:
‘My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:
Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!'
Nothing beside remains. Round the decay
Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare
The lone and level sands stretch far away.”

~ Percy Bysshe Shelley, 1792 - 1822

   Tom,

You have a good point. I don't think I am against written poetry. I've tried reading English poetry but the meanings behind them is I get frustrating lost. Poetry is just beyond me. The difference between what I can express and what a poet can express is like the difference that I can paint stick figures and an artist can paint Guernica or Sunflowers.

Does that mean I am against Pablo Picasco?... or Vincent van Gogh? Nope

So much acclaimed poetry is so sanitized that it puts me to sleep.

Look for free verse. No rhyme; no meter; just the metaphors, allegories, imagery and the likes.

If you happen to see the title "Fanny Says", a book of poetry by Nickole Brown, its first poem is "Fuck" and tells of Brown's grandmother's use of that word and its various forms.

It begins, "Fuck is what she said, but what mattered was the tone...." It ends "...my grandmother / who didn't ask for power but took it in bright, full, fuck-it-all bloom."

Tom, an exciting poet and her poem, Small Sorrows, starts with a jolt to my senses: 

You can start anywhere,

you can start with the hummingbird

that quivers at the feeder, or with a moon

lost in the corner, or the stray dog who creeps

to my window and breathes. But not with

the Lebanese woman on TV who sobs as she

trudges back to her house of rubble.

...

~Small Sorrows, VANDAL POEM OF THE DAY: JANUARY 23, 2017, by Debora...

 

   Joan,

That poem I CAN understand........I think.

Thomas, go to the site and read the rest of the poem. Let me know your reaction. 

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