Books:- Non-fiction

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Books:- Non-fiction

Where can freedom from religion be found, if not in books? Emphasis here on non-fiction.

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Latest Activity: Nov 22

Zoobiquity: What Animals Can Teach Us about Health and the Science of Healing

From the book's description:

In 2005, cardiologist Barbara Natterson-Horowitz consulted on an unusual patient: an Emperor tamarin at the Los Angeles Zoo. While examining the tiny monkey's sick heart, she learned that wild animals can die of a form of cardiac arrest brought on by extreme emotional stress. It was a syndrome identical to a human condition but one that veterinarians called by a different name--and treated in innovative ways.
...
Joining with science journalist Kathryn Bowers, Natterson-Horowitz employs case studies and scholarship to present an understanding of what animals can teach us about the human body and mind. In Zoobiquity the authors describe a new species-spanning approach to health. Delving into evolution, anthropology, sociology, biology, veterinary science, and zoology, they break down the walls between disciplines, redefining the boundaries of medicine.

Still recovering from Catholicism, I turned first to the chapter Roar-gasm - An Animal Guide to Human Sexuality and found that unlike the education (yet) of medical doctors, the education of veterinarians is free from Victorianism's woman-hateful and hurtful moralisms.
Some other chapters are titled The Feint of Heart, Scared to Death, Fat Planet, Grooming Gone Wild, Fear of Feeding, and Leaving the Nest.

Though not in the medical field, I'm looking forward to an interesting read.

Discussion Forum

Worlds in Collision, by Immanuel Velikovsky

Started by tom sarbeck Nov 4, 2016. 0 Replies

Why are this book and its now-deceased author so passionately attacked by Standard Model cosmologists (more compactly Big Bangers or Bangers)?Why was this book found open on Albert Einstein's desk…Continue

Tags: origins, astronomy, science, history

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Comment by tom sarbeck on November 22, 2017 at 6:59am
Plinius and Thomas, there is a test for people in important jobs.

Being only temporarily cynical, in America the wealthy are presumed healthy.
Comment by Thomas Murray on November 21, 2017 at 2:53pm

Randall,

Thanks for the suggested books.

One book I tried reading through titled, " The meaning of belief :religion from an atheist's point of view" by Tim Crane published Oct 30, 2017.

 I dunno what to make of it. It seems that Tim Crane was being an apologist for religious people and actually had the gall to ask us atheist to be "tolerant' of them.

Comment by Thomas Murray on November 21, 2017 at 2:46pm

 Plinius,

 Sometimes that's the question I often ask myself, "Why isn't there a test for people in important jobs?"

 The Oval Office is one of the most powerful position in the world. Donald Trump in the Oval Office is liken to giving a child a warship to play with.

  Do the many American people realized just how insane it is having Donald Trump in the office? I don't think so.

Comment by tom sarbeck on November 21, 2017 at 2:13pm
Randall, re the books
Churchill/Orwell: I downloaded the sample.
27 Psychiatrists: shrinks slept in on Nixon, too.
Grocery: did it name Kroger Grocery & Baking, (where my dad worked)?
Comment by Plinius on November 21, 2017 at 9:29am

Why isn't there a test for people in important jobs? Those 27 psychiarists could also have spoken before the campaign started and have Trump carted off to a nice quiet room in a nuthouse.

Comment by Randall Smith on November 21, 2017 at 8:04am

3 books worth reading: 

Churchill and Orwell, The Fight for Freedom , by Thomas E. Ricks. It's a different look at two Brits--their roles before, during, and after WWll.

The Dangerous case of Donald Trump, "27 Psychiatrists and Mental Health Experts Assess a President". (Bandy Lee, et.al) They all agree, Trump is delusional, paranoid, psychotic, sociopathic, a narcissist, hypomanic, tyrant, and dangerous. After reading about half the book, I was so sickened, I had to quit. More sickening is the fact that Pogo was right. "We" were suckered in and voted him into becoming our president. We're to blame.

Grocery: The Buying and Selling of Food in America, by Michael Ruhlman.  Loren would like this book, since it focuses on Cleveland's Heinen's supermarkets. Good read.

Comment by Bertold Brautigan on August 13, 2017 at 1:16pm

"Jean-Paul Sartre walks into a café, and the waiter asks what he'd like to order. Sartre replies, 'I'd like a cup of coffee with sugar but no cream.' The waiter goes off, but comes back apologizing. 'I'm sorry Monsieur Sartre, we are all out of cream. How about with no milk?'"

Sarah Bakewell, in her wonderful new book, At the Existentialist Café - Freedom, Being, and Apricot Cocktails.


There's no introduction or preface, and here are her opening and second paragraphs:

It is sometimes said that existentialism is more of a mood than a philosophy, and that it can be traced back to anguished novelists of the nineteenth century, and beyond that to Blaise Pascal, who was terrified by the silence of infinite spaces, and beyond that to the soul-searching St. Augustine, and beyond that to the Old Testament's weary Ecclesiastes and to Job, the man who dared to question the game God was playing with him and was intimidated into submission. To anyone, in short, who has ever felt disgruntled, rebellious, or alienated about anything.

But one can go the other way, and narrow the birth of modern existentialism down to a moment near the turn of 1932-33, when three young philosophers were sitting in the Bec-de-Gaz bar on the rue du Montparnasse in Paris, catching up on gossip and drinking the house specialty, apricot cocktails.

As an arrogant undergrad I dismissed existentialism, at least à la Sartre's crowd. as a kind of teeny bopper philosophical equivalent of bubble gum music. As an arrogant old fart I'm deciding maybe I owed them a bit more respect than that. 

Great book

Comment by Randall Smith on July 30, 2017 at 7:40am

While some sections of the following book irritated me (religion), for the most part, The Vanishing American Adult, by U.S. Senator Ben Sasse (NE), was a worthwhile read. 

It's primary focus is on raising adolescents (and younger) to become "producers", not "consumers". The end (adult) result is to "rebuild a culture of self-reliance".

My children are all parents themselves, so it's too late for me to change my parenting ways. I read the book with my grandchildren in mind.

Senator Sasse is a conservative Republican, just the opposite of me. However, I agree with his assessment of today's youth--mostly molly coddled, spoiled with modern technology and lifestyle.  He recommends (in general) more chores, more reading, travel. On these points, I have to concur.

I'm happy that 3 of my grandchildren (out of 6) are being raised on a farm. They will have plenty of chores, if not downright hard work, in the years to come (They're ages 2-8.).

I'll be following Sen. Sasse more closely in the future. Too bad he's a "believer".

Comment by Thomas Murray on July 26, 2017 at 12:24pm

Anyone familiar with this title?

"Furiously Happy: A Funny Book About Horrible Things"

https://www.amazon.com/Furiously-Happy-Funny-Horrible-Things/dp/125...

Comment by tom sarbeck on July 26, 2017 at 12:31am
Kathy, I forgive more slowly than a rock the size of a mountain becomes sand. You've given my life several millenia of purpose. Etc, etc, and etc. ;)
 

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