Disposability Consciousness


Disposability Consciousness

"I know in my heart that as long as trashing the planet and trashing each other, a healthy, holistic and healed world is not possible. We can not have peace ON the earth unless we also have peace WITH the earth. Our disposability consciousness is a weapon of mass destruction."

~ Julia Butterfly Hill

Members: 8
Latest Activity: Oct 19

Discussion Forum

40 percent of e-waste recyclers are frauds

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner Sep 21. 0 Replies

Forty percent of all US electronics recyclers testers included in the study proved to be complete shams, with our e-waste getting shipped wholesale to landfills in Hong Kong, China, and developing…Continue

Tags: e-waste recycling fraud

"Green" Rio 2016 Olympics

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner Aug 11. 0 Replies

The Rio Olympic Committee doesn't bother to recycle.from Cheezburger…Continue

Tags: Greenwashed Olympics, Rio Olympics

Overpackaging *grrr*

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by Grinning Cat Feb 18, 2013. 3 Replies

Deceptive overpackaging adds insult to the evil of not-green. I recently bought Finish detergent, where the box contains smaller packets.…Continue

Tags: overpackaging

Comment Wall


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Comment by k.h. ky on October 19, 2016 at 12:04am
I parked, walked back,retrieved the six pack ring, and pulled every ring loose before I disposed of it in the trash. Seems I'm always picking up others trash from parking lots and putting it in the trash can that's usually only a few feet away. People often disgust me.
Comment by k.h. ky on October 18, 2016 at 11:54pm
I've carried my own grocery bags for years. A couple of them are just soft sided coolers that I picked up on sale at the dollar store. The rest are cloth ones I bought years ago. I tell the clerks exactly how I want them packed. They listen to me because I never let them remove the bags to the bagging turnstile. I can get all my cold things in two of them. And I don't have to pick up bruised produce from the parking lot or drive.
I'm passionate about not using plastic if there's anyway to avoid it. I won't let them put a plastic bag of apples or potatoes inside another stupid plastic bag.
My two young gdaughters are equally adamant about it. I had to park my car once because my, then eight year old gkid, spotted the plastic from a six pack of drinks lying in the parking lot and was so concerned about it washing to the ocean and harming or killing a dolphin or anything else :) sweet child.
Comment by Daniel Wachenheim on October 18, 2016 at 8:20pm

OK, here is another thought about something disposable.  Plastic grocery bags consititute a major pollutant, they waste petroleum, they cllutter the environment and kill animals.  All that for something that is used for, probably, a few minutes.

A few cities ban them, but not many.

Most of the reusable grocery bags are made from re-processed disposable grocery bags.  They last somewhat longer, if you don't try to wash them in the washing machine.  They should be washed from time to time, because they can accumulat....  Most don't take many washes because they fall apart.

I took a reusable bag that was starting to fall apart, and took it apart at the seams.  Then I used it as a pattern to make a new bag.  For fabric, I used a pair of khaki trowsers that Ning wore out at the seams, and to line it, a pair of flannel pajamas that was falling apart.     Easy to make, machine washable, machine driable, can just throw in with other clothes.  Much more durable than the plastic ones, and insulates cold foods better.

I liked that, but wanted a stronger one for flour and milk jugs and other heavy groceries.   Denim is as strong as it gets.  So I made this one from a pair of jeans from a yard sale, $1.  Same pattern, but didn't line it.

These were easy to make for a novice sewing guy.  They'll last a long time.  They solve the problem of disposable bags, they are much better than purchased bags, plus free or more economical than bought bags, and they solve the washability problem.  Plus, being made from old trowsers, it means one less thing going to landfill.

I did have to combine sections to get pieces large enough for the sides of the bags.  That was not a problem, and the seam is actually stronger than the fabric without seams.

Comment by Daniel Wachenheim on October 17, 2016 at 11:14am

I was getting tired of my old dinnerware plates and dishes.  Last summer, one of my neighbors had a yard sale and sat out a few old Corelle dishes.  I liked them and started looking for matches at other yard sales and at Goodwill.  This week I found a few more, so now it's a completed set plus some spares.

I can't de-convince Ning that Corelle (Vitrelle)  is plastic.  It's actually glass, and 60% is recycled glass from earlier preoductions while most of the rest comes from sand and some minerals. Here's how they are made. I'm not advertising, I just think it's interesting. Too bad it all looks robotic. The old ones probably had more workers involved.

This product is no longer made by Dow Corning. It was sold to "World Kitchen" in the US and in Europe, the French glass group ARC International. Since I'm in the kitchen cooking, more than any other room - when awake - it's fun to experiment with kitchen ware. I like these being so durable they can be used for decades, and the patterns were so popular that a set can be compiled from second hand sources. It's bright, looks clean, washes easily, cheerful, durable, thin and light. Since the total cost for the set was around $10, if something breaks it's no big deal. Once in a while I give a friend or neighbor a dish of fresh fresh fruit or a baked good, and I always use 2nd hand dish or plate and tell them they don't need to return it. Maybe that will be passed on to someone else, and if it is, prevents going into landfill, costs nothing, and is not a plastic disposable.

Comment by Daniel Wachenheim on October 15, 2016 at 12:37am

Joan, I wouldnt want to return to those days! Maybe there is something in between. Today I went to the second hanc store. I lije using the old Pyrex type glass measuring cups, mixing bowls and losf pans.  Also vintage Corelle.  Never wears out, excellent baking performance, and great weight and feel. I came home with a solid feeling glass mixing bowl - something I use daily and often want a spare - and some Corelle cups to complete a set.  Great fun.

Comment by Joan Denoo on October 14, 2016 at 12:17pm

My Grandma Whitehead's old Maytag washer, the kind with a wringer attached, served her through so many babies I can't even count. She had it until she gave up her home. Same with the wood stove. Oh! those days ended, never to return. She livd with my parents until she went into a nursing facility and could not learn how to work the automatic washer and dryer. 

I feel as she must have felt when I try to figure out how to integrate different components to my computer. Any of the grandchildren and great-grandchildren can do the tasks with ease. 

Sorry, Daniel, I know of no one with a 1950-60 gas stove. 

Comment by Daniel Wachenheim on October 14, 2016 at 11:34am

Last week two burners froze up on my Maytag range.  I had the repairman come over, and he had to have new valves shipped from California.  Two days later, the oven quit working,  So he had to come over again,  and now the glow coil that lights the flame also needs replacing.

When I bought this stove, I thought it wss a solid, durable, long lasting brand that would last for decades.  My parents bought a gas stove when they married in 1945.  It was working fine when they died 60 years later.  I found one just like it on-line but it costs $7,000 plus shipping from California. 

There is a punch line here  :-)

I told this to the repairman.  He said yes, vintage stoves are much simpler, more reliable, and more durable.  He noted that when Energy Star appliances came out, they were fitted with chesp digital sensors and regulators that reduce energy usage of new appliances.  But they break down quickly - like this stove - and with digital planned obsolescence, new appliances wind up gojng to the land fill less than 10 years after manufacture, as opposed to vintage appliances that last decades.  So a stove that costs thousands, is disposable. 

Oh well.  I cant afford the vintage gas ranges, so I will stick with this one.  I dont know what to suggest to some-one buying one.  Electric has fewer working parts, does not need gas valves, as many sensors or regulators, but I really prefer gas for cooking.  I think the fewer doo dads and frill, means less can go wrong but no guarantee.

If you know someone with a 1950s or 1960s gas stove, 30 inches wide, in good condition,  that they are getting rid of, I would love to hear about it :-)

Comment by Ruth Anthony-Gardner on October 1, 2016 at 8:09pm
Comment by Ruth Anthony-Gardner on August 31, 2016 at 6:02pm

from a Robert Scribbler blog comment

Comment by Joan Denoo on January 20, 2013 at 10:53pm

I had o idea there was a risk using pyrex baking dishes. The testimonies certainly reveal a serious problem and the photos tell a frightening story. My daughter has a lot of Pyrex and I will alert her to the risks. Thanks. 

I like the idea of using old glass, and you are right, follow direcions. 


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