New evidence shows how bacterium in undercooked chicken causes GBS

Impatient ? Rushing to finish cooking your chicken?

Poultry doesn't just harbor antibiotic resistant bacteria. You might also be at risk to get Guillain-Barre Syndrome from Campylobacter.

A Michigan State University research team is the first to show how a common bacterium found in improperly cooked chicken causes Guillain-Barre Syndrome, or GBS.

The federally funded research, now published in the Journal of Autoimmunity, not only demonstrates how this food-borne bacterium, known as Campylobacter jejuni, triggers GBS, but offers new information for a cure.

If chicken isn't cooked to the proper minimum internal temperature, bacteria can still exist.

“What our work has told us is that it takes a certain genetic makeup combined with a certain Campylobacter strain to cause this disease,” said Linda Mansfield, lead author and MSU College of Veterinary Medicine professor. “The concerning thing is that many of these strains are resistant to antibiotics and our work shows that treatment with some antibiotics could actually make the disease worse.” [emphasis mine]

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Replies to This Discussion

Oh! Great! Made sick by one of the meat groups that people eat and the remedy may make the disease worse. Quite a corner into which we paint ourselves!

 

I've always carefully watched the degree to which the meat I eat is cooked.  With chicken and pork, two meats that have a tendency to dry out when overcooked, I use recipes where the meat cooks in a sauce.  This helps to keep meat moist.  In fact I'll often double the ingredients for the sauce just to have extra for the meat and also to flavor a side dish of rice, potato, or pasta.

Steaks and red meat...always cooked well done.  A steak ordered at a restaurant...always requested well done. Red, runny blood from the meat I eat is an instant "no."

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