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Comment by sk8eycat on June 28, 2015 at 3:07pm

Joan, since I'm retired, I don't HAVE to eat anything if I'm not hungry, and I'm rarely hungry these days. 

I have always liked "breakfast food," like Mexican omelets* for dinner, a nice big wedge of iceberg lettuce with 1000 Island dressing for lunch.  I sometimes have a small bowl of oatmeal with butter and brown sugar an hour before bedtime...maybe once a month. 

I used to like a slice of leftover pizza for breakfast....cold or reheated... didn't matter.  But I haven't had pizza for at least 5 years now.  I don't crave it anymore....used to though.

I bought 2 lbs of fresh cherries the last time I shopped (on line)...Deeeee-licious, and they help take the edge off the pain in my feet.

The people at the nutrition program keep checking on me, and are a little astonished that I can't eat everything they bring....it's too much. 

I give my sister the daily 8oz of milk because she still believes the "Every Body Needs Milk" nonsense. And I get at least one banana a week....Gaaaahhhh!  She thinks those nasty things are "healthy," too.  So nothing gets wasted.

*(We used to laugh when some gringo would order a "Spanish omelet" and then chew out the wait staff when they were served eggs wrapped around potatoes with cheese.  But that IS a Spanish-style omelet.....bland)

Comment by Michael Penn on June 28, 2015 at 8:41am

at a couple of Mangos, Joan. Eat an orange. Have coffee if you will.

Have a good sandwich for lunch and if you can have no bread then eat all of it together as in a salad.

For dinner steam some vegetables and eat meat like chicken or fish.

Comment by Joan Denoo on June 28, 2015 at 8:29am

How interesting, Randy, no breakfast at all? I start to shake and get sweaty within an hour of waking. Craig, my son, recommended fruit upon rising with no bread products or meats, carbohydrates at lunch which is usually a sandwich of one kind or another, and protein with fibrous vegetables for dinner. My blood sugar stays at just about 100 all day long using this method. 

How do you get through the morning without breakfast? 

Comment by Randall Smith on June 28, 2015 at 7:20am

You are so right on, Felaine! Eating no breakfast at all is best, followed by eating no grains (cereal, toast, pancakes). If one must, eggs, fruit, maybe bacon or ham. And no orange juice--too much sugar. Milk substitutes include almond milk or whey powder in water.

Yes, we've been bamboozled on all fronts. Criminal.

Comment by sk8eycat on June 26, 2015 at 5:09pm

When I was touring, and eating in hotel coffee shops, and places like that, I learned to love omelets and grits and other things I'd never tried before.  Huevos rancheros with homemade tortillas.  Oh, my!  Or half a cantaloupe with a BIG scoop of vanilla ice cream in the middle.... I rarely had that, but my roommate did....she was afraid of huevos rancheros.

I taught myself to make everything but the tortillas....Julia Child helped a lot with demonstrating the omelet techniques.  But I have never felt like eating anything for 3 or 4 hours after I wake up. Thirsty, yes, but not hungry.  (Cranberry juice made with Splenda mixed with club soda in the summertime.  It's not as icky-sweet as straight cran juice.)

I still can't bring myself to write about the ghastly summer I worked at Paramount Citrus (Cal Fame).  I'll get there.

Comment by Joan Denoo on June 26, 2015 at 3:57pm

What an amazing story! Felaine, you bring the best information and with the citations, no less. I love breakfast; I eat a big one every morning and have since I was as big as a toadstool. So, I have diabetes? Sounds as good as any other explanation! I'm not a great fan of milk or cereal. My most recent routine is fresh fruit and frh yogurt with roasted unsalted nuts. 

Comment by Plinius on June 26, 2015 at 3:24pm

Milk is for babies and young animals. I never liked cereal and after the Kellogg story less than ever.

Comment by sk8eycat on June 26, 2015 at 1:50pm

It's been decades, but I used to like plain, dry puffed rice (never wheat) as a snack.  Gives ya stinky breath, though.   (I never could tolerate cows' milk...humans are the ONLY mammals that habitually drink milk once they've been weaned.  Another PR scam.  From the dairy industry.)

Comment by sk8eycat on June 26, 2015 at 11:40am

Why eat breakfast at all?  Especially cereal, for Post's sake?

http://www.gnolls.org/2181/the-breakfast-myth-part-2-the-art-and-sc...

The Shocking Origins Of Breakfast Cereal

We’ve already established that breakfast cereals are the nutritional equivalent of candy—but how were we bamboozled into eating expensive empty calories? Surprisingly, cereal wasn’t originally a cynical marketing ploy to sell sugar to children. Felicity Lawrence, a British journalist, investigates:

Prepackaged and ready-to-eat breakfast cereals began with the American temperance movement in the 19th century. In the 1830s, the Reverend Sylvester Graham preached the virtues of a vegetarian diet to his congregation, and in particular the importance of wholemeal flour. Meat-eating, he said, excited the carnal passions.
[…]
“After Jackson’s invention, the Seventh-Day Adventists took up the mission. […] John Harvey Kellogg…set about devising cures for what he believed were the common ills of the day, in particular constipation and masturbation. In Kellogg’s mind, the two were closely linked, the common cause being a lack of fibre, both dietary and moral.

Kellogg experimented in the sanitarium kitchen to produce an easily digested form of cereal. Together with his wife and his younger brother, William Keith, he came up with his own highly profitable Granula, but was promptly sued by Jackson, the original maker of Granula, and had to change the name to Granola.”

-

That’s right: breakfast cereal, including “granola”, is a cynical marketing ploy by religious fundamentalists to destroy your sex drive. And if you’ve got a strong stomach, you can click here to see what John Harvey Kellogg did to children (and adu... (Warning: absolutely disgusting.)

Meanwhile, I strongly recommend you read Lawrence’s entire article, because it’s fascinating.

 -Breakfast Cereals Americans No Longer Love

Our Bodies Already Feed Us In The Morning

Fasting is a high-fat meal…of your own adipose tissue. Remember, every diet is a high-fat diet, because if you’re losing weight, you’re burning your own fat. And fat-burning is most intense in the morning, because we haven’t eaten all night. So when we wake up, we’re already eating a steady diet…of fat.

Furthermore, our bodies give us a shot of cortisol in the morning, as we wake up. Cortisol increases gluconeogenesis (the process by which our liver creates glucose), so that we can maintain normal blood sugar when we’re not eating any. First, it seems unlikely that we’d evolve this metabolic pattern if we usually had access to food right after waking up.

Most importantly, morning cortisol explains why we’re not hungry immediately upon waking: not only are we already burning our own fat for energy, our liver has already gone to work making glucose for us!

Here’s the problem: most of us are in a rush to get to school or work, and we can’t just wait around the house for a few hours until we finally get hungry. But we’re told over and over that breakfast is the most important meal of the day! We’re supposed to eat something…

And that’s why modern “breakfast food” is snacks and sugary junk: it’s all we can force ourselves to eat when we’re not hungry.

Comment by Randall Smith on June 26, 2015 at 6:53am

In trying to use up last year's potatoes, I made potato pancakes. Not all that great, let me tell you. Whereas I use to eat cold cereal for breakfast every morning, I'm down to about once in five days. Cutting back on eating grains is not easy.

 

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