Information

Food!

All about food!
Making food.
Eating food.
Where food comes from.
What you like
What you don't like.
Recipes.
How and why of food.
Bon appetit!

Members: 46
Latest Activity: on Tuesday

Fervet olla, vivit amicitia.

"While the pot boils, friendship endures."

Discussion Forum

Precut bagged salad fosters Salmonella

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by Daniel Wachenheim Nov 24. 4 Replies

Umami - why we catsup, cheese, and fries

Started by Daniel Wachenheim. Last reply by The Flying Atheist Oct 6. 1 Reply

A Map Of Where Your Food Originated May Surprise You

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Daniel Wachenheim Oct 5. 4 Replies

Chicken stock

Started by Joan Denoo Sep 28. 0 Replies

Timers

Started by Idaho Spud. Last reply by Daniel Wachenheim Aug 12. 18 Replies

Vegan isn't most sustainable diet

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by Daniel Wachenheim Aug 5. 1 Reply

The amazing incredible awesome fantastic potato.

Started by Daniel Wachenheim. Last reply by Qiana-Maieev Jun 19. 13 Replies

Comment Wall

Comment

You need to be a member of Food! to add comments!

Comment by k.h. ky on November 7, 2016 at 6:29pm
Mexico cornbread and homemade chili for dinner. My gdaughters and I are making peanut butter fudge later.
Comment by Joan Denoo on November 7, 2016 at 8:37am

Spud, I use the same idea as you with a piece of smith material wrapped around a tree to keep squirrels away. 

Randy, one of my favorite dinners is breakfast food. 

Comment by Joan Denoo on November 7, 2016 at 8:34am

Randy, your recipe sounds delicious; I will try it. 

Daniel, with worms on plants, I use edible diatomaceous earth.

I like New Jersey Wakefield because it has early maturity audit is easy to grow. 

http://www.rareseeds.com/early-jersey-wakefield-cabbage/

Comment by Joan Denoo on November 7, 2016 at 8:24am

Chris, I use New Jersey Wakefield for slaws, cabbage rolls and sauerkraut. I usually grow it and seldom find it in grocery stores. 

"Heirloom. This American cabbage is a favorite for early harvest, forming a conical, pointed, dark green head with a smooth, sweet flavor. The head is slow to split and slow to bolt. Holds in the garden for 2 to 3 weeks after maturity. Rich in vitamins and minerals. Some gardeners consider this the best tasting of all cabbages."

https://bonnieplants.com/product/early-jersey-wakefield-cabbage/

Comment by Randall Smith on November 7, 2016 at 7:28am

Speaking of cabbage, last night I fried some up with onion, lemon juice, honey, mustard, salt and pepper, and placed it in a baked tortilla with sour cream and a little Panka. Incredibly good!

Comment by Daniel Wachenheim on November 6, 2016 at 10:29pm

Greyhound or Eersteling cabbage.

Kalibos cabbage.

My cabbages get a lot of slugs and cabbage worms.  Maybe I should try to grow one of these, in 2017, anyway.

Comment by Daniel Wachenheim on November 6, 2016 at 10:22pm

Chris, I haven't seen or grown it, but the place where I get heritage seeds, supplies some that look similar.

Baker Creek Cabbages

Most of the grocery store vegetables here are very limited.  The diversity is in factory made processed foods.  That catalog is very non-mainstream.  I've grown some of their squashes, pumpkins, radishes, and turnips, all are great.

Comment by Idaho Spud on November 5, 2016 at 12:47pm

Chris, I've not seen or heard of that kind of cabbage.

Comment by Plinius on November 5, 2016 at 12:12pm

My American neighbour told me that this cabbage is unknown in the USA, but perhaps that isn't true. We call it spitskool - pointed cabbage. How do you call it?

Comment by Idaho Spud on November 5, 2016 at 11:34am

I think my dad used aluminum sheets to wrap the trunk.

 

Members (46)

 
 
 

line

Update Your Membership :

Membership

line

line

Nexus on Social Media:

line

© 2016   Atheist Nexus. All rights reserved. Admin: Richard Haynes.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service