Godless in the garden

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Godless in the garden

Welcome to gardeners, growers of veggies, fruits, flowers, and trees!  

 

Welcome  backyard hen enthusiasts, worm farmers, beekeepers & composters!

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 174
Latest Activity: 5 minutes ago

Welcome to Eden!

If you like to dig in the dirt, plant & prune, grow food & flowers, or sit and watch as someone else does your landscaping, you'll find something here to discuss!

Selected topics, in sort of alphabetical order:
Aging.  Gardening with an older body.
bees.  insectary.  insectsbee gardening. Beneficial insects.  insects drive evolution

Compost.  herecontaminated compost.

Backyard Chickens here. here. here. here.

Edible yard.  here  urban farmfront yards.
Growing Fruits

Folklore.

Fragrance and Scenthere.
Fruit growing.  in a small space, by backyard orchard culture.
Frugal gardening.  labels.

Gardening for future generations.  also permaculture, trees, historic varieties, soil

Hegelkultur here, here, here

Heritage and historic varieties.   heresources

locally grown plants to prevent blight transmission here.

Moon Phase Widget here. Moon phase topic here.

PeppersHot peppers.

Permaculture MollisonFalk  Liu, Joan's IntroTransformation in 90 days, Perm Principles at work. Food forest, Holzer

Potatoes.  here.

Rooftop gardening.  here

Seed starting. starting spring crops.

Scientific Gardening.   The Informed Gardener.  The truth about garden remedies.

Soil and soil building - healthy soil microbes, mycelium, dirt is everything, soil analysissoil pH.
Squirrels.

Synergies.

Tomatoes.  Myths and truths

Trees.  Tree tunnels.  Ancient tree planting. Plant commemorative trees

Discussion Forum

The Hen in Winter

Started by Daniel W. Last reply by k.h. ky on Saturday. 10 Replies

Fruit Pests: Apricot

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Joan Denoo Jun 28. 3 Replies

Permaculture, Ben Falk

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Joan Denoo Jun 24. 1 Reply

Change, the only constant

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Joan Denoo Jun 16. 4 Replies

Change, the only constant

Started by Joan Denoo Jun 15. 0 Replies

Favorite Flowers

Started by Daniel W. Last reply by Randall Smith Jun 8. 8 Replies

The Evolution of Ecological Consciousness

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Joan Denoo Jun 4. 1 Reply

Living in the forest

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Idaho Spud May 27. 6 Replies

Good plants that volunteer.

Started by Daniel W. Last reply by Idaho Spud May 25. 17 Replies

Sentient Biped's Garden Blog. Happy to add a different feed if there are suggestions.

Comment Wall

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Comment by Idaho Spud 6 minutes ago

Oh, yes Joan.  I've never seen Sweet Potato leaves before.  They are beautiful.

Comment by Joan Denoo 22 minutes ago

Spud, what a great buy! All the parts of the cold frame are there and you don't have to go after the different elements. Having a heating system gives you great advantage when planting seeds or dividing plants. Most tend to like warmth. 

I love sweet potatoes, both as a plant and as edible product. I especially like them roasted but the heat says "don't heat the oven today".

 

Comment by Joan Denoo 1 hour ago

Kathy, good for you! What a great job you do in creating it! I agree with Barbara, layers of cardboard or piles of newspaper would be a good bottom layer. Black plastic will hold water, especially if you have wet weather. When the water level rises to the top of the plastic, the water will flow over and into the soil. You may have some problems with it holding too much water for the health of the plants. The good consequence could be the logs that are under water will act like a sponge and soak up water and store it. 

You can build the hugelkulture as high as you want ... even 6 or 8 feet tall. 

"Hugelkultur are no-dig raised beds with a difference. They hold moisture, build fertility, maximise surface volume and are great spaces for growing fruit, vegetables and herbs. Hugelkultur, pronounced Hoo-gul-culture, means hill culture or hill mound."

https://www.google.com/search?q=hugelculture&oq=hugelculture&am...

Hugelkultur are no-dig raised beds with a difference. They hold moisture, build fertility, maximise surface volume and are great spaces for growing fruit, vegetables and herbs. Hugelkultur, pronounced Hoo-gul-culture, means hill culture or hill mound.

Comment by Barbara Livingston 1 hour ago

Thanks Spud. I water them for first time this a.m. We had so much rain for so long I wasn't sure they would live and gave them time to really dry out. Planted May 7 - so another month or so should have taters!   Cold frame sounds pretty nifty. 

Comment by Idaho Spud 1 hour ago

Barbara, Sweet Potatoes must like it hot and wet.  I planted one for the first time this year, and since I started watering it heavily, it has grown fast.

Comment by Idaho Spud 1 hour ago

Barbara, my Cold Frame has a thick piece of Styrofoam on the soil, then sand on top of that, and the sand has an electric heating cable in it.

It's well insulated, with Styrofoam inside the walls, and with a transparent corrugated top with another piece of plastic 1 inch below that.

Comment by Barbara Livingston 2 hours ago

Kathy, the only thing I would suggest is several layers of cardboard instead of the black plastic. Better draininage for bed, IMHO. When I finished putting mine together it was almost 3 feet high, and it has settled quite a bit.  I planted cantaloupe on the top and I think they died from too much rain, ditto the squash. I created a mini-bed around the edges of the hugelkultur and planted sweet potatoes in it - then I edged entire thing with rocks. Sweet potatoes are alive. :)


Spud, heated?  Howso?

Comment by Idaho Spud 9 hours ago

I don't know enough about it to help you Kathy, but you reminded me about a huge limb that blew off my neighbor's tree a few days ago.  If I can think of a place to put it on my small property, I'll go collect it.  It's like a medium sized tree.

Comment by k.h. ky 16 hours ago
I put together my first hugelculture bed. I found eight good sized, well aged, logs. Stuffed them with decomposed leaves,from the woods, then covered them with 18 gallons of compost. Now I'm going to wait for it to settle, add more rotting tree trunks and then more compost. It's only about 10'lx3'w. The depth is about twenty" but I'm planning on adding at least another foot to the top.
Should l try to add rocks around the edges to keep the compost from washing out? That's going to be a lot of work and rocks! I put black plastic down before I started.
Does anyone have any suggestions?? Ideas?
I meant to start smaller but decided the trees would be more stable, and last longer, uncut.
Comment by Idaho Spud 22 hours ago

Well, with all new materials, it would cost me about $90 to build a new one.  Using the materials I have on hand, I could build one for about $10.

 

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