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Godless in the garden

Welcome to gardeners, growers of veggies, fruits, flowers, and trees!  

 

Welcome  backyard hen enthusiasts, worm farmers, beekeepers & composters!

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 179
Latest Activity: 1 hour ago

Welcome to Eden!

If you like to dig in the dirt, plant & prune, grow food & flowers, or sit and watch as someone else does your landscaping, you'll find something here to discuss!

Selected topics, in sort of alphabetical order:
Aging.  Gardening with an older body.
bees.  insectary.  insectsbee gardening. Beneficial insects.  insects drive evolution

Compost.  herecontaminated compost.

Backyard Chickens here. here. here. here.

Edible yard.  here  urban farmfront yards.
Growing Fruits

Folklore.

Fragrance and Scenthere.
Fruit growing.  in a small space, by backyard orchard culture.
Frugal gardening.  labels.

Gardening for future generations.  also permaculture, trees, historic varieties, soil

Hegelkultur here, here, here

Heritage and historic varieties.   heresources

locally grown plants to prevent blight transmission here.

Moon Phase Widget here. Moon phase topic here.

PeppersHot peppers.

Permaculture MollisonFalk  Liu, Joan's IntroTransformation in 90 days, Perm Principles at work. Food forest, Holzer

Potatoes.  here.

Rooftop gardening.  here

Seed starting. starting spring crops.

Scientific Gardening.   The Informed Gardener.  The truth about garden remedies.

Soil and soil building - healthy soil microbes, mycelium, dirt is everything, soil analysissoil pH.
Squirrels.

Synergies.

Tomatoes.  Myths and truths

Trees.  Tree tunnels.  Ancient tree planting. Plant commemorative trees

Discussion Forum

What Killed My Chicken - How To Know

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Daniel Wachenheim on Wednesday. 2 Replies

Polluting Yourself with Leaf Blowers

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by Daniel Wachenheim Sep 22. 6 Replies

Willow tree

Started by Thomas Murray. Last reply by Ruth Anthony-Gardner Sep 15. 12 Replies

Front yard gardening. Edible Estates.

Started by Daniel Wachenheim. Last reply by k.h. ky Sep 15. 14 Replies

Archer Strawberry

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by Idaho Spud Sep 15. 2 Replies

Deer Fence Installed! But Where's the Mulch?

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Randall Smith Sep 6. 1 Reply

My Farm Failures - Revealed Justin Rhodes

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Joan Denoo Aug 15. 2 Replies

Sentient Biped's Garden Blog. Happy to add a different feed if there are suggestions.

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Comment Wall

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Comment by Daniel Wachenheim 1 hour ago

Planted garlic today. First crop planted to harvest in 2017. That assumes the world won't end sooner than that. :-)

I think I bought these starts in 2001 and have been growing them ever since. The variety is Inchelium Red. It's an heirloom variety from the Colville Indian Reservation in Inchelium, Washington.

Comment by Daniel Wachenheim 1 hour ago
Today's Harvest.

The sweet corn variety is "Bodaceous." I give it a 10 out of 10. Earlier I had "Mirai" - too sweet and not such good corn flavor. This year "Bilicious" and "Trinity" were also good in my garden. "Trinity is a little sweeter and not as rich corn flavor, but is shorter season so good to plant for earlier harvest.

Comment by Daniel Wachenheim 11 hours ago

Randy, that raspberry wine sounds like a lot of fun!  Great home science project!

Don I grew storage onions this year, but not as many.  We harvested them in July here, and Im 2/3 through them now.  This was our first year growing them.  Do you use seeds, plants, or sets?  I used sets but thinking about starting seeds in 2017.

We are 2/3 through our russett and yukon gold potates too.  Planning to start twice as many next year.

If I have the energy, today I want to pull out the corn stalks and plant garlic.  It's time to do that now.

Comment by Don 12 hours ago

It's true!  There is real satisfaction in bypassing the vegetable aisle--for a few months, anyway.  We keep our harvest of onions, beets, garlic, carrots, Brussels sprouts, leeks, squash, and cabbages in a cold (unheated) room till January, when that space threatens to get too cold, then we move them into the basement, which serves pretty well as a root cellar till about March.

Comment by Idaho Spud 12 hours ago

Don, it looks like you never have to buy onions, carrots, and probably many other things from the store.

Comment by Don 12 hours ago

I love the look of that raspberry wine, Randall.  I made some black currant vodka earlier this summer, also some cherry vodka, and have been pleased with the results.

Yesterday, I pulled my yellow onions.  They did better this year that usual--good size.

Comment by Idaho Spud 13 hours ago

Impressive carrot harvest Don.

Same for your squash Daniel.

Comment by Randall Smith 14 hours ago

I made my first "Fall batch" of red raspberry wine yesterday, and will make more today. I have a balloon attached to show the fermentation process occuring. Of course, the raspberries are mine. I'll be moving a portion of my patch after the season ends.

Comment by Joan Denoo 23 hours ago

Well, my garden is full of weeds that tower over my head telling me that the soil is in excellent shape and I am the biggest slug of all. Just no energy. Thankfully, the structure of my plantings hold their own in this jungle and provides excellent growing space for some ambitious younger person. 

Comment by Joan Denoo yesterday

Daniel, your squash, persimmons, and pumpkins surely would win in a county fair! Everything looks healthy with promises of delicious flavors. Whatever you do, it produces fine products. 

You and Don would compete head to head at a county fair. 

Vancouver in Western Washington State and Danville, Vermont in northern Vermont produce some fine garden products. 

 

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