Godless in the garden

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Godless in the garden

Welcome to gardeners, growers of veggies, fruits, flowers, and trees!  

 

Welcome  backyard hen enthusiasts, worm farmers, beekeepers & composters!

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 176
Latest Activity: yesterday

Welcome to Eden!

If you like to dig in the dirt, plant & prune, grow food & flowers, or sit and watch as someone else does your landscaping, you'll find something here to discuss!

Selected topics, in sort of alphabetical order:
Aging.  Gardening with an older body.
bees.  insectary.  insectsbee gardening. Beneficial insects.  insects drive evolution

Compost.  herecontaminated compost.

Backyard Chickens here. here. here. here.

Edible yard.  here  urban farmfront yards.
Growing Fruits

Folklore.

Fragrance and Scenthere.
Fruit growing.  in a small space, by backyard orchard culture.
Frugal gardening.  labels.

Gardening for future generations.  also permaculture, trees, historic varieties, soil

Hegelkultur here, here, here

Heritage and historic varieties.   heresources

locally grown plants to prevent blight transmission here.

Moon Phase Widget here. Moon phase topic here.

PeppersHot peppers.

Permaculture MollisonFalk  Liu, Joan's IntroTransformation in 90 days, Perm Principles at work. Food forest, Holzer

Potatoes.  here.

Rooftop gardening.  here

Seed starting. starting spring crops.

Scientific Gardening.   The Informed Gardener.  The truth about garden remedies.

Soil and soil building - healthy soil microbes, mycelium, dirt is everything, soil analysissoil pH.
Squirrels.

Synergies.

Tomatoes.  Myths and truths

Trees.  Tree tunnels.  Ancient tree planting. Plant commemorative trees

Sentient Biped's Garden Blog. Happy to add a different feed if there are suggestions.

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Comment by Joan Denoo yesterday

Daniel, your new avatar photo reveals a happy, rested face. I hope I read your smile accurately.  I like it!

Comment by Joan Denoo on Sunday

All the flowers, vegetable gardens and skills sharing feels like spring has sprung. My lilacs, tulips, forget-me-nots, bloom in all their glory. The roses survived the strange winter. I have lots of weeds to pull and the recent rains will help. 

Ten gallons of chicken poop should arrive tomorrow to start composting next years humus. 

It is still too cold to have breakfast outside. 

Comment by Plinius on Saturday

I'll try them! Health? You haven't seen the traffic twelve metres lower, Daniel, but there's no escaping from that - not for me. I think my system is used to pollution - on the days I travel to a friend 30 km. from here I get seriously sunburnt.

Comment by Daniel W on Saturday
Chris, I dont think they would be unhealthy to eat, bu t might be tough or bitter. I would taste a piece to see what it is like.
Comment by Plinius on Saturday

I found collard greens from roots that survived the winter - any reason why I shouldn't eat them?

Comment by Daniel W on Saturday

BB those are beautiful!  Just amazing!

Cenek, yiour potatoes are a bit ahead of mine too.  I just hilled up the Burbank Russets, which seem to grow the fastest.  The Yukon Gold, which I planted a week earlier, are only half the size and not yet needing to be hilled up.

I havent been growing cabbages yet - with the need to protect from deer and rabbits, and in the case of cabbages from slugs and cabbage worms, I have not had the ambition yet in my climate.  I do have some collard greens that I started inside and planted the first ones outside this week.

Comment by Bertold Brautigan on Friday

Rhodies are out.

Comment by Randall Smith on April 26, 2016 at 6:37am

Gee Cenek, are you that much more ahead in growing weather than Indiana? Impressive.

Comment by Čenek Sekavec on April 26, 2016 at 12:07am

Ugh sorry that the photo doesn't show up nicely. Nearly warm enough to add straw mulch... 

Comment by Daniel W on April 23, 2016 at 6:46pm

Randy, please update us on those grape cuttings. I have two varieties rooting as well, in potting soil. They have not convinced me they will grow yet,but not all hope is lost. Some photos around the yard. - Compact lilac "Bloomerang" - a modern Korean type lilac.

Mountain ash flower, close up.

Another historic iris variety, Iris "florentina" - this variety has been grown for 600 years and is used in orris root.


Viburnum - the type my grandparents called a snowball bush. Nice nostalgic plant, and deer don't even touch it so it grows unprotected in the yard.

 

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