Godless in the garden

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Godless in the garden

Welcome to gardeners, growers of veggies, fruits, flowers, and trees, backyard hen enthusiasts, worm farmers, & composters!

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 179
Latest Activity: 26 minutes ago

Welcome to Eden!

If you like to dig in the dirt, grow flowers, putter around the yard, dig in the kitchen garden, raise backyard hens, or just like daydreaming about the garden, this is the place.

Many topics have been discussed in the archive.  Revive a topic by adding your 2¢ or start a new topic.

Everyone likes photos of the garden, so if you like to share photos of your prize dahlia, your favorite hen, or your first tomato, go right ahead!

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Comment by Annie Thomas on October 7, 2012 at 3:36pm

Beautiful web, Sentient!  And Joan, your comment made me think of the Science Friday episode a few days ago.  Ira Flatow was interviewing Steven Strogatz.  He wrote the book, "The Joy of X: A Guided Tour of Math, from One to Infinity."  Flatow brought up a Feynman quote about finding joy in knowledge, and asked Strogatz if he agreed (which he did).  He gave the example of seeing the Fibonacci sequence in so much of nature, from the number of scales in a pine cone's spiral to the seeds in a sunflower.  It's funny, as it is things like this that perhaps could be the only way to convince me that there is any type of god or "creator"... but it doesn't. ;-) If you are interested in the program, you can listen to it here: http://www.npr.org/2012/10/05/162372203/steven-strogatz-the-joy-of-x

Sentient:  Do you know what type of spider created this web?

Comment by Joan Denoo on October 7, 2012 at 1:49pm

An incredibly beautiful evidence of fractal geometry in living things, and the existence of patterns in nature. I wonder how the spider knows how to build a web? Perhaps, one day, we will be able to understand the workings of the brain and body. But for now, I can just enjoy the shapes, forms, textures, and colors all around us and realize I/you/we exist following the same evolution processes to make life as we know it. How could we ask for anything more?

Comment by Daniel W on October 7, 2012 at 1:23pm

This morning in the yard.

Comment by Joan Denoo on October 5, 2012 at 1:23am

Red oranges from Sicily! I wonder what the chemical components are to make such a flavor. Are they able to bottle it, or freeze it? But then, that goes against my principle of eating locally. Oh yes, we do need to make some changes. 

Comment by Plinius on October 5, 2012 at 1:07am

Of course there is terroir! You made me think of the red oranges that grow in Sicily on volcanic soil. The taste is unforgettable - and you cannot grow them anywhere else with the same result.

Comment by Daniel W on October 4, 2012 at 10:36pm

Annie, I know that other traits are affected by local conditions, so flavor would not surprise me.  I've moved a few plants from my late parents' yard in Illinois to my yard in Southwest Washington.  The shape and size of the plants, and the leaf color, is very different here.  Then moving some 30 miles to my new place, again significant changes.  For example, in Illinois, the Sempervivum were big, juicy leaf, medium green leafed plants.  Here, they are smaller, sage green.  At the new place, they have red tips to the leaves.  Also noting differences in leaf and stem color for peaches, plums, and some alliums.  So if the plant shape and appearance is different, maybe the flavor is too?

Comment by Annie Thomas on October 4, 2012 at 6:34pm

So glad you are enjoying the topic!  There is a wonderful book titled, "Terroir: The Role of Geology, Climate, and Culture in the Making of French Wine" bu James E. Wilson.  It's a large and rather expensive book, but I wonder if your local library would have it?  It is written by a geologist and the biggest complaint about the book is that it is so heavy in geology (which is one of the things I enjoy about it).

I remember watching the movie "French Kiss" many years ago.  I love the scene where the main character brings out a box he made as a school project that is filled with little vials of different scents.  One has lavender, another truffles, etc.  This was my first introduction to the concept, but also made me wonder what other plants retain something from the soil they are grown in.  Now, some believe there is really no such thing as "terroir", but I beg to differ.

Comment by Daniel W on October 4, 2012 at 6:19pm
Comment by Daniel W on October 4, 2012 at 6:15pm

Annie, that's wonderful information!  Thank you!  Terroir.  Learning something new.  It's so cool!  

Comment by Annie Thomas on October 4, 2012 at 6:07pm

Sentient- The "weird thing" you think about is not weird at all, but actually a whole study of agriculture.  "Terroir" is a term used to describe a specific area of soil and all of the characteristics of it.  It includes the climate, the topography, the native vegetation, minerals in the soil, and many other things that are escaping me at the moment. ;-)  I always interpret it as the flavor of the land.  It is most commonly used when discussing wine, the terroir of an area also affects coffee, tomatoes, and a growing list of plants (some are even using it to describe and differentiate cheeses).  It is a French word, but the concept of terroir is now believed to date back as far as 3000 BC Egypt, as they understood the importance of the interaction between the environment and the grape vine.  If you google "terroir" you will get plenty of information, in case you are interested in further reading.

I wholeheartedly agree that the local soil gives a certain flavor to some harvests.

 

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