Godless in the garden

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Godless in the garden

Discussing all aspect of gardening.

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 181
Latest Activity: 6 hours ago

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Comment by Joan Denoo on October 17, 2012 at 10:03am

The Hypnotic Patterns of Sunflowers

Nature's mathematical marvel, the sunflower displays the Fabonacco Sequence and the Golden Ratio. These are not numbers that just happened, inquiring minds figured these out by observing and asking why and experimenting and trial and error. These were not a "rule" handed down by ancient beliefs, they were discovered, much as an explorer discovers new lands. The discovered patterns then became codified into the sciences and used for effective, efficient and beautiful  designs. 

Fibonacci sequence: or 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89, 144 ... each number in the sequence is the sum of the previous two numbers. In sunflowers, the spirals in the center are generated from this sequence -- "there are two series of curves winding in opposite directions, starting at the center and stretching out to the petals, with each seed sitting at a certain angle from the neighboring seeds to create the spiral."

Golden Ratio: or  2/3, 3/5, 5/8, 8/13, 13/21, etc. ..."choose the most irrational number there is, that is to say, the one the least well approximated by a fraction. This number is exactly the golden mean. The corresponding angle, the golden angle, is 137.5 degrees. (It is obtained by multiplying the non-whole part of the golden mean by 360 degrees and, since one obtains an angle greater than 180 degrees, by taking its complement). With this angle, one obtains the optimal filling, that is, the same spacing between all the seeds

 

Comment by Joan Denoo on October 15, 2012 at 2:20am

Nerdless, a favorite flower of mine, sunflowers. Glad to learn stevia works out well for you.

Comment by Nerdlass on October 15, 2012 at 2:14am

This weekend I went to see the sunflower fields in the town over. A typhoon had come and knocked most of them down, but I was able to enjoy them, nonetheless. I was simply amazed at the size of the heads! Like dishes! Wow! LOL Anyway, I just want to thank you, Joan for all your advice with the stevia. So far, so good!

Comment by Joan Denoo on October 14, 2012 at 11:30pm

Here is a better video of fractals that explains techniques and processes. If you try to create a fractal with pencil and paper, it is virtually impossible. I spent several days doing the geometry to bring cosmos out of chaos. With a computer, it just means punching in a few numbers, pressing a "Go" and wait. The original Mandelbrot set was left to run overnight, I think by accident, and resulted in unbelievable patterns.

"Understanding Fractals"
http://videos.howstuffworks.com/tlc/33733-understanding-fractals-vi....

Comment by Joan Denoo on October 14, 2012 at 8:46pm

This rather fundamental fractal, showing only a brief example of fractal tree design, reveals a representation of how natural growth develops. I wish he would stay with forms of flora growth, that could be very interesting to watch. I find the geometric patterns less interesting than flora, sometimes. 

https://vimeo.com/51366486

Comment by Joan Denoo on October 14, 2012 at 11:02am

The original root and shrub from great-grandma's grave is dying but there are many little ones sprouting all around it, so when the old shrub dies, there are still many viable roots from that stock. They are beautiful bushes and I am sure they will be very pretty. One is about 6 feet tall now, the others are from 2 inches above ground to about 3 feet. Life seeks to live and this ancient root lives on. Yes, the old one was fragrant. And I love her. 

Comment by Joan Denoo on October 13, 2012 at 9:34pm

This one grows into the arborvitae and into an old scrawny lilic that isn't pretty, but I dug a root from one growing on my great-grandmother's grave located in a pine forest in Emida, Idaho. The lilac definitely is not a fancy variety, probably something my grandmother dug from her own garden. 

This is my neighbor to the east who has Clematis terniflora, (aka paniculata), “Sweet Autumn Clematis”.

Cary harvested my Concord grapes this week, leaving some for the birds. 

Comment by Joan Denoo on October 12, 2012 at 5:12pm

My neighbor and I have been experimenting and exploring which kinds of clematis we each have and how we should care for them. First thing to know, the incorrect pruning may cost you a plant. We both have lost lovely clematis because we didn't know what we were doing. Here is a guide to help differentiate the three types. 
We also learned that clematis like tomato food. So, those are two problems solved. We keep learning together as we chat through the shared raspberry bushes that came into my garden from hers. 

Comment by Joan Denoo on October 12, 2012 at 5:01pm

Plant Paradise Country Gardens

This is an incredible garden with great combinations of colors, forms, and  textures. These ideas are keepers. 

Comment by Joan Denoo on October 10, 2012 at 5:02pm

A Brief History of the Wonderful Tomato

For those interested in history, here is a fun one on tomatoes. 

 

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