Godless in the garden

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Godless in the garden

Welcome to gardeners, growers of veggies, fruits, flowers, and trees, backyard hen enthusiasts, worm farmers, & composters!

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 180
Latest Activity: 19 hours ago

Welcome to Eden!

If you like to dig in the dirt, grow flowers, putter around the yard, dig in the kitchen garden, raise backyard hens, or just like daydreaming about the garden, this is the place.

Many topics have been discussed in the archive.  Revive a topic by adding your 2¢ or start a new topic.

Everyone likes photos of the garden, so if you like to share photos of your prize dahlia, your favorite hen, or your first tomato, go right ahead!

Discussion Forum

GARDEN HOSE PROBLEM

Started by Dominic Florio. Last reply by Idaho Spud on Friday. 15 Replies

Permaculture thinking and skills for youth

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Joan Denoo Aug 24. 3 Replies

Comment Wall

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Comment by kathy: ky on June 17, 2014 at 12:42pm
Barbara, Sam weighs 132 lbs and could easily dig me a good size fish pond. If I could keep him digging in one place. Lol His partner in crime is Sweet E. A small, for me, Boston, at 21 lbs.
Comment by Randall Smith on June 16, 2014 at 8:21am

I think it is Delphinium, Daniel (and Chris). And I had my first yellow flower of evening primrose last night! So much fun watching them bloom as the sun sets. Day lilies (and wild tiger lilies) are blooming, too. I love this time of year!

Comment by Plinius on June 16, 2014 at 1:38am

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delphinium

This looks like your flower, Sentient.

Comment by king on June 16, 2014 at 1:09am
An idea to remove weeds at the roots a remote control robot the digs just below the soil level taking out the root now if only I could build one lol
Comment by Barbara Livingston on June 15, 2014 at 4:43pm

Daniel, I think so too - among friends.  And your flower is certainly too pretty to be called a weed. How about "volunteer wildflower"?

Joan, thanks for explanation. I have to admit I went looking for 'exoskeleton' as I wondered if DE would hurt my little chameleons and now I know it won't.  This site is certainly a wealth of information. 

Hollyhock discussion brought back memories of my life on our farm in upstate NY as a child. We had them surrounding our outhouse - one of the reasons I tried to grow them here in TX as they are so nostalgic for me. 

Joan, yes some biologists were in the cave just prior to our visit and they talked with us for a few minutes after they came out. They wore what looked like hazmat suits and gas masks when they went into the cave. They were placing some kind of testing equipment and said they were in about 20 minutes and that was about all they could stand as they began to get headaches even with their masks.  Amonia smell is incredible even outside the cave. 

Joan, worms! I warmly remember my efforts to grow worms to sell to fishermen. LOL I had a gazillion worms! Fed them daily with organic matter and corn meal. I was a better worm grower than a sales person and finally gave up on the idea. 

k.h. ky, sorry about your flowers, but i'll bet Sam sure had fun!  My little dog only weighs 7 lbs and his holes are tiny but he does an excellent job though. :)

Comment by Joan Denoo on June 15, 2014 at 12:47pm

Daniel, no I don't recognize the blossom. Remember that diatomaceous earth kills slugs and snails but has to be replaced after every rain or watering. It is dangerous to critters with an exoskeleton. People can, and do, eat diatomaceous earth and it is actually good for you! I'd love to see see a photo of Ming in his garden. And one of you in yours. 

Barbara, I wonder how the scientists figured out which baby belonged to which mom? I would hate to be the one to go in and tag them and then try to find them after the mothers returned. I wonder if the scientists had to wear gas masks? A fascinating topic. I will peek into my bat house today to see if I can see anything. I'll have to read the rest of that great bat site you provided us. 

Chris, funny hollyhock seeds sprouted this year, of all years. I hope you can get a photo of it to us if it blooms. 

Randall, I like the hollyhock because of the birds it attracts, as well as the pretty structure of the plant and blossom. The neighborhood kids like to play with them, just as I did when I was a child. 

My worm farm is going great numbers of wrigglers. To small to get a photo. 

Comment by kathy: ky on June 15, 2014 at 12:26pm
My dog, Sam, dug up the last of my black hollyhocks last year. I hate it when that happens.
Comment by kathy: ky on June 15, 2014 at 12:22pm
Sentient, that runs wild in ky. You can see fields of them. I can't remember the name though.
Comment by Daniel W on June 15, 2014 at 12:05pm

Barbara, the other photos are a few pages back on comments now.  That's something I love about this group - there is so much active conversation.  I feel among friends and neighbors.

Anyone know this weed?  It comes up among the flower borders and in vegetable beds.  It is not invasive - only a few here and there, and growth is compact.  They have a pretty flower, either blue or pink.

Comment by Daniel W on June 15, 2014 at 8:42am
Randall, thats what makes it great! Gardening is in full season!

I think the midwest and Northeast must be prime hollyhock growing country. Each year I try something new, either plant or technique. Sometimes several things. Now that the four o'clocks look like tey are sbout to start blooming, and the scallop and other squashes are growing, time for something new. I have never seen hollyhocks here. I read, rabbits snd slugs like them. I will plan for those. It will be interesting to start them now, for next year.

I got everbearing strawberries a few years ago. Not as productive by far, but they continue through the sumner here. We are getting a lot now.

Joan I would love to try those Turkish hollyhocks! That would be really special for me. If you think of it when they seed, i will plant them in both pkaces. Thank you!

Blooming now - Ning's wildflower meadow, especially poppies of all kinds. Daylilies. Lilies. Roses. Meyer lemon - in container, overwinter indoors. very fragrant.
 

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