Godless in the garden

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Godless in the garden

Discussing all aspect of gardening.

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 181
Latest Activity: 15 hours ago

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Comment by Randall Smith on July 7, 2018 at 7:01am

Terroir--good word. Had to look it up. I'm considering going to France next year, so I'll add that word to my French vocab.

We had a storm front go through two days ago with 2" of rain and strong enough winds to lay flat my sweet corn. Aarrgghh! It happens every year. So I spent 3 hours propping it back up. Not fun: muddy, mosquitoes, pollen in my eyes (swelled shut later!), etc. And more weeds. I'm getting too old for this!

Comment by Loam Gnome on July 6, 2018 at 8:30pm

Joan, thank you.  This is a good time of year to reap the benefits of a kitchen garden.

Randy, you are right, of course!  I dont know if it's the freshness, or just garden grown.  But I like these potatoes more than store bought.  Maybe there's something in the local soil that gives them a flavor I like.  I guess that's the terroir.

Comment by Randall Smith on July 6, 2018 at 6:31am

Impressive potatoes, Daniel. I told you old ones would work. Cherries aren't a favorite of mine: too tart and difficult to pit. I don't even bother going to a tree down the road to pick them.

Comment by Joan Denoo on July 4, 2018 at 10:30pm

Your cherries look bright, plump, full of flavor, and will most assuredly make delicious pies. 

Your milkweed looks like our healthy ones that grow wild here. 

Comment by Patricia on July 4, 2018 at 7:21pm

Are we invited? I LOVE home made cherry pie!!!

The potatoes look really good.

Comment by Loam Gnome on July 4, 2018 at 7:17pm

Today I harvested, pitted, and froze enough pie cherries for 3 more pies. These were from a "wild" cherry tree that was probably planted by a bird, 50 years ago.  Huge tree.  The cherries are not as red, and have a slight bitterness when raw, but bake into awesome pies.

I also noticed that the earliest potato hills started to die down, and dug them up.  There are enough red potatoes for potato salad, and enough russets for a few batches of hash browns.  That's just 4 hills, and these were random potatoes from the garage that withered and sprouted last winter.  Not bad.

Comment by Loam Gnome on July 3, 2018 at 10:40pm

Randy, I hope that fencing works!  Wild animals are my biggest garden frustration.

Comment by Loam Gnome on July 3, 2018 at 10:39pm

To be honest, I dont think these taste as good as other blackberries I grow.  But they are not seedy.  Im waiting now for other varietiez - Prime Ark Freedom, which was really good last year, and Triple Crown and Arapaho, both of which I have not tried before.  All are thornless.  Triple Crown had the best reviews.

Milkweeds are blooming.  They are not native here.  I wondered if they would survive and grow.  They did.

Today I mowed the area that will be Rufus's "back yard", mowed and weeded my fig orchard, and scrubbed out a rain barrel.  That water went onto the fig trees .  This is a promising summer for figs

Comment by Patricia on July 2, 2018 at 1:53pm

Blackberries, one of my favourites!

Comment by Randall Smith on July 2, 2018 at 10:07am

I wish my blackberries were that big. But, mine are wild. We planted some chestnut trees on the farm this past spring. I haven't checked to see how they're doing. PS: I love Rufus' name!

Heard a NPR piece this morning about poison ivy. Hard to believe that most people can't recognize it. It is ubiquitous around here. In fact, I have a little bit on my hands, despite being very careful when I see it.

Put up my electric fence around sweet corn over the weekend. What a chore: posts to dig, wire to string, etc. Hope it keeps the 'coons out.

 

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