Godless in the garden

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Godless in the garden

Discussing all aspect of gardening.

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 181
Latest Activity: 21 hours ago

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Comment by Loam Gnome on October 19, 2018 at 9:44pm

Joan, am I calculating right, Ginkgo survived 3 mass extinctions?  That's pretty durable or adaptable.  From wikipedia, they originated 270 million years ago.

I like to think that the trees I plant will do something, or leave progeny, for later generations.  That might be a vain thought, but it helps keep me going.  That is also my motivation for growing a dawn redwood (Metasequoia glyptostroboides), which was common during the Paleocene epoch, which is not nearly as ancient as ginkgos, but is still a living fossil.

Does anyone here know what to do with walnuts in the shell / husk?  I saw a tree with many walnuts by the roadside and picked up a bucket full.  The might be black walnuts, not sure.

Comment by Joan Denoo on October 19, 2018 at 5:58pm

Sorry, my link didn't work. 

The Ginkgo site, beautifully designed and chock full of information, offers a tree that may well meet the challenges of the coming years.

Photos for Ginkgo Petrified Forest State Park

Comment by Joan Denoo on October 19, 2018 at 3:14pm

The Ginkgo site, beautifully designed and chock full of information, offers a tree that may well meet the challenges of the coming years. To think that the A-bomb killed life all around, even as this badly damaged tree remained to be the center of a new era. The art and designs amaze me. 

The big five mass extinctions:

1. End Ordovician, 444 million years ago, 86% of species lost, probably caused by "a short, severe ice age."

2. Late Devonian, 375 million years ago, 75% of species lost, probably caused by the "newly evolved land plants that emerged, covering the planet during the Devonian period. Their deep roots stirred up the earth, releasing nutrients into the ocean. This might have triggered algal blooms which sucked oxygen out of the water, suffocating bottom dwellers like the trilobites."

3. End Permian, 251 million years ago, 96% of species lost, 
probably caused by a "cataclysmic eruption near Siberia blasted CO2 into the atmosphere. Methanogenic bacteria responded by belching out methane, a potent greenhouse gas. Global temperatures surged while oceans acidified and stagnated, belching poisonous hydrogen sulfide.  'It set life back 300 million years.' Rocks after this period record no coral reefs or coal deposits." 

4. End Triassic, 200 million years ago, 80% of species lost, "Of all the great extinctions, the one that ended the Triassic is the most enigmatic. No clear cause has been found."

5. End Cretaceous, 66 million years ago, 76% of all species lost, probably caused by "volcanic activity and climate change already placed the ammonites under stress. The asteroid impact that ended the dinosaurs’ reign provided the final blow. Only a few dwindling species of ammonites survived. Today, the ammonites’ oldest surviving relative is the nautilus. Will it survive the sixth great extinction?" 

6. ?

~ The big five mass extinctions

Comment by Patricia on October 19, 2018 at 1:25pm

Don't know about server or location, but I like that weather report site best.

Comment by Patricia on October 19, 2018 at 1:23pm

Beautiful trees. Charlie will never leave your heart, Daniel.

Comment by Loam Gnome on October 19, 2018 at 12:09pm

for some reason the link below didn't take.  Here it is again.

Comment by Loam Gnome on October 19, 2018 at 12:08pm

Each fall, I like to post update on my dad's Ginkgo tree.  He collected the seeds from a neighbor's tree.  That neighbor was a German freethinker, whose son-in-law inherited the house and tree, after he died.  He was a Unitarian Universalist minister, which in that time and town was kind of radical, and almost atheist.  I planted those seeds in the late 1990s, in flowerpots, in the apartment where we were living in Chicago.  When we moved to Vancouver, WA, three of the trees came here with us.  One didn't make it through transplanting, one is much smaller after two transplantings and something killed the top, which is growing back now.  This one, is majestic.

As a genus that originated in the Permian era, Ginkgos survived two of the planet's great extinctions.  The first gave us the dinosaur era, and the second gave us the mammal era.  I wonder if they will make it through the next great extinction?  I like to think so.

Same tree in 2006.  I miss Charlie, still, but Rufus is helping a lot.

For a lot, lot more info about ginkgos, this link is to the ginkgo pages, a ginkgo enthusiast in Holland maintains this site.  I probably won't be starting any more ginkgo seeds - I don't know what to do with the trees that grow from them.

Comment by Loam Gnome on October 19, 2018 at 11:46am

Patricia, maybe that is a difference based on server or region?  I don't know.  Still learning :-)

Comment by Patricia on October 17, 2018 at 9:17pm

Odd, monthly is on mine.

Comment by Loam Gnome on October 17, 2018 at 9:12pm

Patricia, I can't figure out how to get monthly data but the app does give two week predictions for my town 

 

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