Godless in the garden

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Godless in the garden

Discussing all aspect of gardening.

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 181
Latest Activity: 3 hours ago

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Comment by Randall Smith 3 hours ago

"It's about 4 years from planting the (milkweed) seeds." What does that mean, Daniel, oops, Loam?

A little clarification: my house is separate from my farm (5 miles). I've lived here for 41 years (107 yr old house). The farm land has been in my family for 154 years (now 120 acres).

We received 4" of rain in 24 hours, flooding fields and basements. My raspberries took a major hit being pelted with large raindrops. But that's nothing compared to the damage done on the organic vegetable plants at the farm. Hopefully, they'll recover. Unlike soybean and corn fields, they can't be insured.

Comment by Loam Gnome yesterday

Joan, good luck with those flower seeds!  I hope you will keep us posted!

The cleome, bachelors' buttons, and cosmos have not germinated yet, but it's only a few days.  With weather in the 90s, they may not grow.  Also true for the last sweet corn that I planted.  Watering daily.

Comment by Loam Gnome yesterday

Joan, thank you for the reminder about dead heading.  I have some roses that need it now.  The daylilies have only just begun to bloom.  This year, I want to taste-test to see which daylily flowers taste better.  Last year, I sometimes just broke off flowers and munched them.  They are mild, crunchy, juicy.  Good in a salad.

Randy, you have a great looking front porch.  I'm very impressed that your home has been in your family for so many generations.  Reading about your raspberries, I checked my blackberries.  Some are starting to turn red now.  I did eat a handful of mulberries today.  We picked 5# of sweet cherrires, and enough tart cherries for a pie.

A milkweed plant.  These flowers are very fragrant.  It's about 4 years from planting the seeds.

Geraniums.  I keep them dry for the winter, in the garage, then start them up again in Spring.  Each year, they get bigger and more lush.  There is a Four O'clock plant among the geraniums.  I think it's from a 2 or 3 year old root.

The tallest of the chestnut trees, planted winter 2016.  This one bloomed, but only one flower was female.  Another chestnut also bloomed, so I placed its male flower up against the female on this tree.  Who knows if a chestnut will result.

Comment by Patricia yesterday

YUM!

Comment by Randall Smith on Wednesday

Red raspberries are in "full force". Hard to keep up picking--and beating the Japanese beetles to them. Cloudy day, so the picture isn't too great.

Second photo is of my front porch (still a cloudy day).

Oops--photos reversed somehow.

Comment by Joan Denoo on Wednesday

How to Keep Stella de Oro Daylilies Blooming All Season

This simple procedure will keep many types of flowers blooming longer; daylilies, petunias, are two that I know of. 

Comment by Joan Denoo on Wednesday

Loam Gnome, I sent off an order to Territorial Seed Co for 

cosmos, echinacea, marigold, rudbeckia, yarrow, and zinnia.

I'll try a few seeds this season, and will be ready for next season. Thanks for the information.

Comment by Patricia on Wednesday

Rick did peppers in the greenhouse & we were overloaded with them the first year, & gave them away to neighbours as well as freezing enough to last 2 years!

The next time, they were so overrun with aphids they didn't do anything despite everything Rick tried to get rid of them, so he gave up on peppers.

The neighbour brought these pepper plants over the other day, & Rick just ''stuck 'em'' where he found room, so no idea what will happen this year......if anything.

The first time he tried them outside they didn't do well, but the year happened to be a cold miserable one at the time, & this was before he built the greenhouse.

Comment by Loam Gnome on Tuesday

Joan, deer and rabbits are big factors in my garden.  I don't want to have everything in fences.  So I experiment.  It looks like neither will eat zinnias, cosmos, marigolds.  I was surprised that daylilies are not touched, although I read that deer eat them.  They don't eat Echinacea or Rudbeckia, both of which can be grown from seeds, started in summer, for the following year.  I also have a hybrid between the two, called Echibeckia.

The Sisyrichium is also an experiment.  The foliage is somewhere between iris and gladiolus.  The flowers are clusters that are more like gladiolus, but much smaller and more informal.

I would love to see the Royal Tyrrell Museum, but I have no plans to see Alberta in the foreseeable future.  It looks like a place I could browse for days.

Patricia, do you find that peppers do better in the garden, as opposed to warmer by the house?  I thought peppers needed even warmer than tomatoes.  maybe that's why my peppers are doing so poorly.

Comment by Patricia on Tuesday

We have many deer through the yard, but they don't seem to bother the garden until after its done. We thought bears would be a problem with the food, but have never seen any nearby.

 

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