Godless in the garden

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Godless in the garden

Welcome to gardeners, growers of veggies, fruits, flowers, and trees, backyard hen enthusiasts, worm farmers, & composters!

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 179
Latest Activity: 1 hour ago

Welcome to Eden!

If you like to dig in the dirt, grow flowers, putter around the yard, dig in the kitchen garden, raise backyard hens, or just like daydreaming about the garden, this is the place.

Many topics have been discussed in the archive.  Revive a topic by adding your 2¢ or start a new topic.

Everyone likes photos of the garden, so if you like to share photos of your prize dahlia, your favorite hen, or your first tomato, go right ahead!

Discussion Forum

How to Store Nuts

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Idaho Spud Feb 23. 3 Replies

Himalayan rhododendrons blooming 3 months early

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by Joan Denoo Jan 22. 4 Replies

Comment Wall

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Comment by Randall Smith 1 hour ago

Thanks, Daniel.

Since I couldn't find a plum tree locally, I ordered one, plus a pecan and a golgi bush. With shipping (like $28!), the three "trees" cost well over $100 (a birthday present to myself.). And unlike my storebought trees, they come bare root. I usually don't have as much luck with bare root.

I'm hoping both the pecan and plum are self pollinating, although I have a "scrub" plum in my yard and a neighbor 1/4 mile away that has two pecans.

I've had one golgi bush die several years ago, so I was hesitant to try another. If any of these trees ever produce fruit, along with my 10-15 other fruit trees, how in the world am I ever going to eat it all?!!! I guess I can give it to my farm kids to sell.

Comment by Idaho Spud 1 hour ago

Randy, I was also surprised with the size of your new trees.

Comment by Joan Denoo 8 hours ago

Kathy, what was your USDA growing zone before the rezoning?

One thing we know for sure about climate change is that nothing is normal, everything changes and into unexpected ways. For example, the jet stream is way off its normal path. That simple fact is that everything else changes. 

Our part of the country isn't having the serious storms that other parts experience. That doesn't mean we will not have some very extreme temperature, up or down, it just means we haven't had them yet.

Given the changes in your weather patterns, what are you planting and how are they doing? 

I am really nervous to trust our new zone 5 changing to zone 6. I am still planting as though a freeze will catch us off-guard. The round in the garden is still frozen an inch or two below the surface and I will wait until the top six inches are warm enough for the planting of seeds. 

Seeds sprout in the greenhouse beautifully, but I keep a close eye on the night temperatures. 

Comment by k.h. ky 9 hours ago
Talk about unpredictable growing conditions. Our part of Ky has been rezoned to a 6b. That explains my planting times being crazy.
One day last week we hit 80°. Crazy for mid March. Now we're back down to the low mid fifties. Bees are coming out and dying :(
Comment by Daniel W 11 hours ago

Randy, those are impressive size trees!  Container, or bare root? 

I was thinking since pears are bee pollinated, the wind direction might not matter.  Bees travel up to 5 miles, and by going to and from their hive, mix pollen from various trees.  I would still graft, because that's what I do :-)

Today it didn't rain. I mowed the grass over 2/3 of our place.  I can barely walk now.  That's a good tired.

Comment by Daniel W 23 hours ago

Randy, that size tree can be grafted. Even tiny trees can.  If you have a source for scion that have not leafed out or buds swelled to bloom, you can do it now.  Sometimes growth of grafts on new bare root trees isnt as vigorous, but it should take.  My concern is more whether you can find dormant scion, than the size of the tree.  I think I was being over cautious.

Comment by Randall Smith yesterday

Well, whatever "manzano" is, I'll eagerly anticipate the bearing of fruit. I like puzzles.

Daniel, I learned to graft in a botany class at IU. I tried it later and was successful on a 3 for 1 pear tree long ago (and far away). I think I remember how to do it, and may try it on my new pear tree. You recommend waiting a year, eh? My new trees are about 10 feet tall. 

I bought a "yellow delicious" apple tree yest. I went to 3 different places looking for a plum, but all 3 strores/greenhouses had only pear, apple, and cherry. I don't ever want another cherry tree.

Comment by Joan Denoo yesterday

according to Collins dictionary, manzano=apple tree in English

Comment by Daniel W yesterday

p.s.  Isn't "Manzano" the Spanish word for apple?  Maybe the label had a translation into Spanish and the actual variety name is elsewhere on the label.

Comment by Daniel W yesterday

Randy, you have an opportunity now, to learn grafting :-)  Its not as hard as people think.  Pear is the easiest, even the messy ones that I did while learning, took and grew and produced flowers and fruits.  Apples are also very forgiving.  I think both have resilient and vigorous cambium, the layer that heals together.  You can either graft from your other trees, just to get pollination, or find someone else with a different variety, including Asian pears, as long as they flower at the same time.

Same for the apple.  Almost all of mine are multigrafts.

I can point you toward references about grafting if you like.  I would wait until they are established next year, although I have grafted onto brand new trees that were bare root just weeks before. 

I couldn't find info about Monzano apple either.  Moonglow has a good reputation.

 

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