Godless in the garden

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Godless in the garden

Discussing all aspect of gardening.

Location: Planet Earth
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Comment by kathy: ky on March 23, 2017 at 10:31pm
Talk about unpredictable growing conditions. Our part of Ky has been rezoned to a 6b. That explains my planting times being crazy.
One day last week we hit 80°. Crazy for mid March. Now we're back down to the low mid fifties. Bees are coming out and dying :(
Comment by Daniel W on March 23, 2017 at 8:55pm

Randy, those are impressive size trees!  Container, or bare root? 

I was thinking since pears are bee pollinated, the wind direction might not matter.  Bees travel up to 5 miles, and by going to and from their hive, mix pollen from various trees.  I would still graft, because that's what I do :-)

Today it didn't rain. I mowed the grass over 2/3 of our place.  I can barely walk now.  That's a good tired.

Comment by Daniel W on March 23, 2017 at 8:43am

Randy, that size tree can be grafted. Even tiny trees can.  If you have a source for scion that have not leafed out or buds swelled to bloom, you can do it now.  Sometimes growth of grafts on new bare root trees isnt as vigorous, but it should take.  My concern is more whether you can find dormant scion, than the size of the tree.  I think I was being over cautious.

Comment by Randall Smith on March 23, 2017 at 7:37am

Well, whatever "manzano" is, I'll eagerly anticipate the bearing of fruit. I like puzzles.

Daniel, I learned to graft in a botany class at IU. I tried it later and was successful on a 3 for 1 pear tree long ago (and far away). I think I remember how to do it, and may try it on my new pear tree. You recommend waiting a year, eh? My new trees are about 10 feet tall. 

I bought a "yellow delicious" apple tree yest. I went to 3 different places looking for a plum, but all 3 strores/greenhouses had only pear, apple, and cherry. I don't ever want another cherry tree.

Comment by Joan Denoo on March 22, 2017 at 5:23pm

according to Collins dictionary, manzano=apple tree in English

Comment by Daniel W on March 22, 2017 at 3:09pm

p.s.  Isn't "Manzano" the Spanish word for apple?  Maybe the label had a translation into Spanish and the actual variety name is elsewhere on the label.

Comment by Daniel W on March 22, 2017 at 3:08pm

Randy, you have an opportunity now, to learn grafting :-)  Its not as hard as people think.  Pear is the easiest, even the messy ones that I did while learning, took and grew and produced flowers and fruits.  Apples are also very forgiving.  I think both have resilient and vigorous cambium, the layer that heals together.  You can either graft from your other trees, just to get pollination, or find someone else with a different variety, including Asian pears, as long as they flower at the same time.

Same for the apple.  Almost all of mine are multigrafts.

I can point you toward references about grafting if you like.  I would wait until they are established next year, although I have grafted onto brand new trees that were bare root just weeks before. 

I couldn't find info about Monzano apple either.  Moonglow has a good reputation.

Comment by Randall Smith on March 22, 2017 at 7:41am
I think I'm going to regret buying the two trees I bought yest. One was called Monzano Apple. I googled it and found nothing. Pretty pink blossoms, however. The pear tree is a "Moonglow". It didn't say anything about needing a pollinater, but it does. I do have two othe pear trees. However, they are 50 yards away and away from prevailing westerlies. I think I'll need a little luck with the wind. What I liked about the tree was that the fruit (if ever) comes early. Well, we'll see.
2-3 more trees to find.
Comment by Daniel W on March 21, 2017 at 9:09pm

I agree.  In addition, with the sun higher in the sky, it is at a more direct angle to the garden soil as well as to out plants, trees, and us.  That means more warmth and, Im guessing, more lumens of light.

Comment by Joan Denoo on March 21, 2017 at 6:20pm

I like Spring Equinox because it designated equal daylight and darkness of our days. At the Vernal Equinox, the Sun crosses the celestial equator on its way north along the ecliptic. The days start getting longer. More daylight means warmer days and nights, the beginning of the growing season, and I had better be sure everything is ready to go into the ground when the soil get warm enough. 

With climate change, we have to pay attention to the weather and what happens. If we have a change of weather patterns everything changes. 

Meteorologically, in the Northern Hemisphere, the official Spring season always begins on March 1 and continues through May 31. Summer begins on June 1; autumn, September 1; and winter, December 1.

The Old Farmer's Almanac

SPRING EQUINOX 2017: FIRST DAY OF SPRING

 

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