Godless in the garden

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Godless in the garden

Discussing all aspect of gardening.

Location: Planet Earth
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Comment by Idaho Spud on September 19, 2016 at 2:48pm

Joan, I don't think that is a sand quarry.  I get my sand from http://www.idahorockandsand.com  They have a large selection of sand, pebbles, and rocks.

No frost here yet, and none in the forecast for the next week.  Lowest temperature has been 39° F.  We can get a frost in September, but the first frost is usually in October.

The only tender plant this year is muskmelon.  I'm growing them in the small greenhouse with the lid open wide.  I only closed it once so far, and the melons seem to be doing fine.

Comment by Joan Denoo on September 19, 2016 at 1:00pm

Randy, sunflowers, dill, and phlox are my favorite flowers for that very reason. I will also add Bee Balm (Monarda), an old-fashioned favorite perennial that grew in Grandma's garden. Bee Balm is deer resistant, very easy to grow, and will attract pollinators like bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds to your garden.

From the mint family, it spreads quickly with shallow roots. Pulling the roots up makes management easy. Don't put the roots in your compost or they will grow all through the pile. That is one chore I gladly prevent. 

I have to confess, ALL flowers give me pleasure.
Comment by Plinius on September 19, 2016 at 12:52pm

I love the mullein family, and I've often tried to sow them but without succes so far.

Comment by Joan Denoo on September 19, 2016 at 12:35pm

Chris, I love your strategy! It sounds like a good plan and hollyhock and poppy seeds make excellent plants for hard to grow places. I would also recommend mullein because it is pretty, likes neglect, appreciates the attention, and the N. American continent received their first seeds from German immigrants during the Colonial period.  It is only fair we reintroduce them back into Europe in the 21st Century. However, I assume they are as prolific in Europe as N. America. 

10 Amazing Health Benefits Of Mullein Tea

mullein uses

When the flowers mature into seeds, cut the seed heads off and throw them in the trash or save the seeds; the plant will grow a new bunch of seed heads before frost. Cut the plants off at ground level at the end of the season and toss them in your compost, if you have one, or in the trash. The reason they are so valuable is the roots grow as deep as the seed heads grow high. The roots bring mineral to the surface of the soil, and your ground will become nourished, and the dead roots act as organic matter as it rots. Oh! I love this plant!

Sadly, people think it is a weed and lose the benefits it provides. The seedlings are very easy to pull up the first year and impossible to pull up the second year. 

It is a biennial; it forms the root and plants the first year and then grows the blossoms/seeds the second year, then dies. 


Comment by Plinius on September 19, 2016 at 9:15am

I harvested a bag full of hollyhock and poppy seed, and I'll scatter them around the private parking lot downstairs. A few years ago I suggested to put some flowers there and they all applauded the idea, but when I started to do something about it, all went wrong. The car and bike owners followed me and began to whine: "No flowers there because... (about fifty reasons). " So now I'll sow in secret and dream of hollyhocks attacking the stupid cars.

Comment by Randall Smith on September 19, 2016 at 7:36am

My list of saved seeds would be extensive. Some things just do their own thing--dill and sunflowers, for example.

Comment by Plinius on September 19, 2016 at 12:59am

I guess not, Joan, borders are rather difficult.

Comment by Joan Denoo on September 18, 2016 at 4:15pm

Spud, have you had a killing frost yet? We haven't had our first light frost; however, Sept. is when we start getting some serious frosts. 

I imagine you have to cover your tender plants regularly, now. 

Is that clear space on E. Gould & Garrett Way a sand quarry? I forget, is your soil sand? Oh yes! I remember now, you had a problem keeping your young seedlings moist and you brought in a lot of compost. I enjoy your photos. 

Comment by Joan Denoo on September 18, 2016 at 4:02pm

Yes, I save all kinds of seeds: sunflower, phlox,Monkshood, Hollyhock from Turkey, borage, chives, Foxglove, Echinacea, forget-me-not, garlic, rhubarb, tomato. Sadly, my Greek Oregano died out that winter I was so sick. I guess that was 2013.

If anyone wants some seeds, let me know and I will send you whatever you want. 

I will need your mailing address.

Chris, can you receive seeds? 

Comment by Plinius on September 18, 2016 at 1:25pm
Hollyhock seeds, but I can't send them, customs would destroy them.
 

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