Godless in the garden

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Godless in the garden

Discussing all aspect of gardening.

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 181
Latest Activity: 10 hours ago

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Comment by Randall Smith on July 5, 2016 at 6:55am

Great photos, Daniel. I'll check out your blogspot info when I'm done here.

This has been the wettest summer I've seen in a long time. I hand  weeded for several hours yesterday, finding it difficult to shake off the soil from the roots. Weeds have crowded out my chard. But, the garden is cleaner than in previous years. Beats sitting around like your slug, Joan! (And I'm sure you're not one.)

Comment by Joan Denoo on July 5, 2016 at 12:15am

Oh! but those pampered ears of corn will taste so good. 

Comment by Joan Denoo on July 4, 2016 at 7:04pm

Daniel, do mothballs work for you. Laura had dozens all around their mowed area and I just threw a few mothballs in each one, covered the hole with their excavated soil and the moles disappeared. 

Comment by Joan Denoo on July 4, 2016 at 6:54pm

Oh! Kathy, your news just makes my day! I love to learn of your progress with the hugelkultur, and getting it to grow things. I surely want to know how your volunteers turn out. 

Daniel, your garden produces such lovely things. You even have a house hummingbird! Now, how smart does one have to be to get that treat? You inspire me!

Has your corn developed ears? We have such cold days, only a few hot days. It is great to work in the cool air, but not so good for corn. 

Daniel, do you use your cell phone to type your messages? You have another skill I don't have. 

I'm a pure slug and enjoying every bit of it. I don't even feel guilty. 

Happy 4th dear friends. 

Comment by kathy: ky on July 4, 2016 at 6:05pm
My yard that has been covered and lying fallow has done wonderful things. Less than two years later and moles are breaking the red clay up to actual soil. Worms are working beneath the cover of dead leaves, straw and occasional compost that I've thrown on top of it. It's amazing what nature can do if given the chance. The spot has gone from a clay run off of water to a living thing.
Comment by kathy: ky on June 29, 2016 at 8:32pm
@joan, your articles are interesting and informative.
I just came in from working the hugelkulture bed that I started late last spring. It's still in the early stages but is beginning to shape up. I started it with rotting trees from my woods and stuffed it full of decomposed leaves and about twenty gallon of decaying matter from the woods. I added about fifteen gallons of compost from my heaps. Last year it produced about a dozen volunteer sweet potatoes. Now it has three volunteer pumpkin plants that are blooming like crazy. But not setting pumpkins. That's not important because I'm using them to hold the dirt in place and prevent run off. I just tapped down some hollow spots and mixed forty lbs of topsoil to it.
It should be ready to plant tomatoes in by next planting season.
Comment by Joan Denoo on June 29, 2016 at 8:14pm

Integrating animals with agroforestry aids in carbon farming 

Comment by Joan Denoo on June 29, 2016 at 7:54pm

THE POTENTIAL OF CARBON FARMING

"Carbon farming is a term used to describe a suite of crops and agricultural practices that sequester carbon in the soil and in above ground perennial biomass. If widely implemented, these practices have the capacity to sequester hundreds of billions of metric tons of carbon from the atmosphere in the coming decades. If we combine carbon farming with a massive global reduction in fossil fuel emissions, it can bring us back from the brink of disaster and return our atmosphere to the “magic number” of 350 parts per million (ppm) of carbon dioxide (CO2)."

"Carbon farming can take many forms.

1) and simplest are modifications to annual crop production to reverse the loss of soil carbon from tillage.

2) we can incorporate perennial elements like trees or perennial grasses.

3) improvements to grazing and pasture management.

4) incorporating trees in pastures.

5) is the use of perennial crops in orchards and other monocultures. 

6) are considered ‘other’ practices of perennial polyculture systems that include terraces, rainwater harvesting, amendments like biochar, and productive management of “wild” ecosystems."

Comment by Joan Denoo on June 29, 2016 at 2:47am
Comment by Joan Denoo on June 27, 2016 at 3:28pm

Daniel, your harvest looks so healthy!! A real testament to your knowledge of experimenting rewards you in a tangible way. 

 

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