Godless in the garden


Godless in the garden

Discussing all aspect of gardening.

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 182
Latest Activity: Feb 28

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Comment by Joan Denoo on November 7, 2015 at 7:44pm

Daniel, thank you! I loved doing it; I hate leaving it; I have an opportunity to design another garden. 

Comment by Joan Denoo on November 7, 2015 at 1:01pm

For me, Crataegus phaenopyrum: Washington Hawthorn was my choice because I saw them In Ireland used as hedgerows. They were pruned by vehicles hitting the brittle branches forming a formal looking hedge. The trees were in full bloom, white, filled with bees, and a subtle fragrance.

When I returned home, I planted one near my canopied deck over the garage. The autumn color was stunningly beautiful, pure copper/red. It had horrid thorns, three inches long and they broke the skin without breaking from the limb. A painful tree to prune. 

The tree snapped at a crotch that I should have pruned to a single trunk while young to remove the vulnerability. Scott, the man who does my pruning, bolted the broken branch back in place, but it did not survive. Cary cut the tree down leaving a trunk about five feet tall that I used as a bird feeding station. I put a five feet diameter wire fence around it to protect birds from cats while feeding on the ground.  

Larry and Old Baldy (me) beside the bird feeding station. I neglected my garden during my 2013 dance with cancer. My hair came back and so did I. 

Crataegus phaenopyrum: Washington Hawthorn

Comment by kathy: ky on November 7, 2015 at 12:27pm
And, important, you have to rub both sides of the cut potatoes into the dirt to protect the other potatoes. It usually works.
Comment by kathy: ky on November 7, 2015 at 12:19pm
Randy,my dad taught us to cut the potatoe in half if we dug into it. You're right that they are not as pretty but they do heal and remain edible as you know.

Spud,Anyone, is there a difference between cantaloup and muskmelon? I could try to google it but my service isn't that good.
I got my wish for cooler temps. We've gone from highs of 80 to highs in the paper 50s. That's a little cooler than l like.

As a friend of mine used to tell me 'I would bitch if I was hung with a new rope'. I miss her.
Comment by Plinius on November 7, 2015 at 8:58am

What's wrong with hawthorn, Daniel? It could be a beautiful border of your ravine.

Comment by Randall Smith on November 7, 2015 at 7:33am

Sounds like a lot of garden clean-up going on. I'm on the bandwagon, too. I stasrted to hack down raspberry canes, but then read it shouldn't be done 'til late winter, early spring. Oops.

Time to mow down the asparagus, remove tomato cages, and level out the potato and squash mounds. I'll leave broc. and Br. sprouts for another month or so. Kale and collards, too. If it's a mild winter, they may survive well into the new year.

Daniel, I'm enjoying my persimmons. Wish you were here!

Comment by Joan Denoo on November 6, 2015 at 11:50pm

Daniel, Thanks for the list of apples you are "partial to". Your list adds to my "Seek, Taste, and Find ones I like" file. 

Comment by Joan Denoo on November 6, 2015 at 7:52pm

Daniel, I don't know what kind of apple tree Laura and Larry planted and they do not have the tag. The only apples that appeared looked and tasted like Granny Smith apples. 

Comment by Joan Denoo on November 6, 2015 at 4:01pm

It is about 1:30 PM and I just came in from the greenhouse where my oldest great-grandson, 16 year old Jacob, and my youngest great-grandson, 7 year old Noah looked for new vegetables. We found three green beans about the size of a long eyelash, and a couple more zucchini growing into vegetables. We sampled leaves of cabbage, celery, radishes, lettuces, onions, beets. The boys liked the different flavors and seem enthusiastic about fresh salads. We eat leaves as fast as they grow, leaving little energy for the root crops upon which to grow. 

Randy, will sweet potatoes grow in straw so that you can dig thm by hand? Also do you grow them in mounds? Sweet potatoes haven't done well for me in the past and I suspect it is the cold nights. I used to grow them successfully in Texas; that was more than 40 years ago and I can't remember if I grew them in straw or if I mounded them. I grow white potatoes, I don't have to dig them. 

Spud, do you successfully grow sweet potatoes? I am glad to learn you are making a van computer friendly. I like your plan for mulching some potatoes in the ground. Keep us posted on how it works for you. 

Daniel, have you tried goats in clearing the brambles? Is your county noxious weed czar willing to work with you on making the ravine and creek wetlands into a more friendly and usable zone? My cousin had problems with his wetlands along the Priest River and had to abandon a plan to make it more migratory bird friendly. He lives right on the migratory route and have flocks of geese and other fowl every spring and autumn. Even the Sandpoint bird club liked his plans. He planned to stabilize the quiet water ponds that occur along the river. 

county noxious weed czar 

Comment by Idaho Spud on November 6, 2015 at 1:50pm

Thanks Randy.  I don't get to enjoy reading you guys comments on a daily basis because I'm getting to the library only once or twice a week now for 2 or 3 hours each time. 

I haven't dug my sweet spuds yet.  I imagine I'll slice into some also, and have to eat them right away.  They're growing on a berm, so I should be able to dig on both sides of them first, and reduce the damaged ones.  I'm also thinking of leaving some in the ground and putting a large amount of mulch on top.  Then dig them up when I need them.


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