Godless in the garden

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Godless in the garden

Welcome to gardeners, growers of veggies, fruits, flowers, and trees, backyard hen enthusiasts, worm farmers, & composters!

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 179
Latest Activity: 18 hours ago

Welcome to Eden!

If you like to dig in the dirt, grow flowers, putter around the yard, dig in the kitchen garden, raise backyard hens, or just like daydreaming about the garden, this is the place.

Many topics have been discussed in the archive.  Revive a topic by adding your 2¢ or start a new topic.

Everyone likes photos of the garden, so if you like to share photos of your prize dahlia, your favorite hen, or your first tomato, go right ahead!

Discussion Forum

How to Store Nuts

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Idaho Spud Feb 23. 3 Replies

Himalayan rhododendrons blooming 3 months early

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by Joan Denoo Jan 22. 4 Replies

Growing Greener Blog

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Comment by k.h. ky yesterday
Joan, we've been zone 7 for as long as I can remember. As for planting I've gone away from annuals and stay with perennials now. Even those are a lot of work with the weeding, thinning, pruning and mulching.
Almost everything blooms several weeks to early only to be bitten off by a sudden freeze.
We've had practically no winter this year. Our temps didn't drop to the upper teens until the first week of March. Then they went back to the mid forties for a low. We're having tornadoes in the dead of winter. And to much rain. We didn't have any snow this year. Last year we had 25" in a twelve hour span.
Our summer temps are getting in the upper 90/100 plus range.
With weather like this it's hard to plan on planting anything and getting a good outcome.
Comment by Daniel W yesterday

These are just cellphone pics and not very good.  Gives an idea of our spring now.  The hummingbird pic is especially blurry, hard to catch them and it's through the kitchen window.

Comment by Daniel W on Friday

We had a much wetter winter.  I think temperature wise it was normal.  The atmospheric river flowed this way, this year. Still very wet.  I hope there are no more frosts.

Randy, the shipping is what gets me too.  I wonder if it really costs that much, or is part of making the catalog prices look lower but recapping the difference in "shipping and handling".  Those chestnuts I ordered, had expensive shipping too.

Home Depot had some packaged gogi bushes, really tiny.  I gave in and bought two, too. 

This year the only fruit tree that I bought, was a multigraft European plum from Raintree.  They list 5 varieties, stating you get 4 of them but they can't say which 4.  Mine wound up being 2 that I did't want so much, and 2 that I did.  It had a big wound at the base, probably from machine processing or digging.  I might have to graft a patch there.  Fortunately I have a source for the patch.  I was disappointed overall.  Even though I don't know if it will even grow, I grafted scion from the scion fair, to one of the branches I didn't want, and another to a branch that I think was the base stock and wasn't one of the wanted types.   That way I get something interesting if they take and grow.

There are people I give my surplus fruit too.  Plus, we use a lot of dried fruit for breakfast cereal and for baking.  Plums are really good that way.  Also fig.  Probably cherries too but haven't tried that.

Kathy, I hope your weather turns out nicer for the Spring and Summer. 

Joan, I bet lilacs would like your area.  They grew big in Ning's home town in Northeast China.  It's bitter cold there in winter, and the winters are long.  I imagine daylilies would like it too.  They grow like crazy, here.

Comment by Randall Smith on Friday

Thanks, Daniel.

Since I couldn't find a plum tree locally, I ordered one, plus a pecan and a golgi bush. With shipping (like $28!), the three "trees" cost well over $100 (a birthday present to myself.). And unlike my storebought trees, they come bare root. I usually don't have as much luck with bare root.

I'm hoping both the pecan and plum are self pollinating, although I have a "scrub" plum in my yard and a neighbor 1/4 mile away that has two pecans.

I've had one golgi bush die several years ago, so I was hesitant to try another. If any of these trees ever produce fruit, along with my 10-15 other fruit trees, how in the world am I ever going to eat it all?!!! I guess I can give it to my farm kids to sell.

Comment by Idaho Spud on Friday

Randy, I was also surprised with the size of your new trees.

Comment by Joan Denoo on Friday

Kathy, what was your USDA growing zone before the rezoning?

One thing we know for sure about climate change is that nothing is normal, everything changes and into unexpected ways. For example, the jet stream is way off its normal path. That simple fact is that everything else changes. 

Our part of the country isn't having the serious storms that other parts experience. That doesn't mean we will not have some very extreme temperature, up or down, it just means we haven't had them yet.

Given the changes in your weather patterns, what are you planting and how are they doing? 

I am really nervous to trust our new zone 5 changing to zone 6. I am still planting as though a freeze will catch us off-guard. The round in the garden is still frozen an inch or two below the surface and I will wait until the top six inches are warm enough for the planting of seeds. 

Seeds sprout in the greenhouse beautifully, but I keep a close eye on the night temperatures. 

Comment by k.h. ky on Friday
Talk about unpredictable growing conditions. Our part of Ky has been rezoned to a 6b. That explains my planting times being crazy.
One day last week we hit 80°. Crazy for mid March. Now we're back down to the low mid fifties. Bees are coming out and dying :(
Comment by Daniel W on Friday

Randy, those are impressive size trees!  Container, or bare root? 

I was thinking since pears are bee pollinated, the wind direction might not matter.  Bees travel up to 5 miles, and by going to and from their hive, mix pollen from various trees.  I would still graft, because that's what I do :-)

Today it didn't rain. I mowed the grass over 2/3 of our place.  I can barely walk now.  That's a good tired.

Comment by Daniel W on Thursday

Randy, that size tree can be grafted. Even tiny trees can.  If you have a source for scion that have not leafed out or buds swelled to bloom, you can do it now.  Sometimes growth of grafts on new bare root trees isnt as vigorous, but it should take.  My concern is more whether you can find dormant scion, than the size of the tree.  I think I was being over cautious.

Comment by Randall Smith on Thursday

Well, whatever "manzano" is, I'll eagerly anticipate the bearing of fruit. I like puzzles.

Daniel, I learned to graft in a botany class at IU. I tried it later and was successful on a 3 for 1 pear tree long ago (and far away). I think I remember how to do it, and may try it on my new pear tree. You recommend waiting a year, eh? My new trees are about 10 feet tall. 

I bought a "yellow delicious" apple tree yest. I went to 3 different places looking for a plum, but all 3 strores/greenhouses had only pear, apple, and cherry. I don't ever want another cherry tree.

 

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