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Godless in the garden

Welcome to gardeners, growers of veggies, fruits, flowers, and trees!  

 

Welcome  backyard hen enthusiasts, worm farmers, beekeepers & composters!

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 179
Latest Activity: 6 hours ago

Welcome to Eden!

If you like to dig in the dirt, plant & prune, grow food & flowers, or sit and watch as someone else does your landscaping, you'll find something here to discuss!

Selected topics, in sort of alphabetical order:
Aging.  Gardening with an older body.
bees.  insectary.  insectsbee gardening. Beneficial insects.  insects drive evolution

Compost.  herecontaminated compost.

Backyard Chickens here. here. here. here.

Edible yard.  here  urban farmfront yards.
Growing Fruits

Folklore.

Fragrance and Scenthere.
Fruit growing.  in a small space, by backyard orchard culture.
Frugal gardening.  labels.

Gardening for future generations.  also permaculture, trees, historic varieties, soil

Hegelkultur here, here, here

Heritage and historic varieties.   heresources

locally grown plants to prevent blight transmission here.

Moon Phase Widget here. Moon phase topic here.

PeppersHot peppers.

Permaculture MollisonFalk  Liu, Joan's IntroTransformation in 90 days, Perm Principles at work. Food forest, Holzer

Potatoes.  here.

Rooftop gardening.  here

Seed starting. starting spring crops.

Scientific Gardening.   The Informed Gardener.  The truth about garden remedies.

Soil and soil building - healthy soil microbes, mycelium, dirt is everything, soil analysissoil pH.
Squirrels.

Synergies.

Tomatoes.  Myths and truths

Trees.  Tree tunnels.  Ancient tree planting. Plant commemorative trees

Discussion Forum

What Killed My Chicken - How To Know

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Daniel Wachenheim on Wednesday. 2 Replies

Polluting Yourself with Leaf Blowers

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by Daniel Wachenheim Sep 22. 6 Replies

Willow tree

Started by Thomas Murray. Last reply by Ruth Anthony-Gardner Sep 15. 12 Replies

Front yard gardening. Edible Estates.

Started by Daniel Wachenheim. Last reply by k.h. ky Sep 15. 14 Replies

Archer Strawberry

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by Idaho Spud Sep 15. 2 Replies

Deer Fence Installed! But Where's the Mulch?

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Randall Smith Sep 6. 1 Reply

My Farm Failures - Revealed Justin Rhodes

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Joan Denoo Aug 15. 2 Replies

Comment Wall

Comment

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Comment by Joan Denoo on September 20, 2016 at 12:47pm

You're welcome, Daniel. Good morning! How are you getting all that work done? I am a lazy slug, and I still don't feel guilty, just enjoying it. Thankfully, I have a lot of support. 

Will Ning be back from China soon? I wonder if he notices many changes in his country since all the trade that increased since the days when I was there, the mid-1980s. It was very primitive then, even in the cities. That is one place I would like to return, even though I don't want to do any more travelling. I shall travel through the stories of others. I hope Ning shares his stories with you and me. 

Have you noticed any changes in temperature or dates of season change? I think I have, i.e. we haven't had our first frost yet. 

I created this lovely garden for my enjoyment, and now I get to watch as the love-slugs enjoy it with me. We both feel great emotion over the whole thing. The slugs and I are getting ready for a wet winter, with little snow, or a cold one with lots of snow, or the usual winter with no difference what-so-ever, according to which Farmer's Almanac I read. 

I just looked and Weather Spokane, Washington Long Range Weather Forecast stated 

"Wetter than usual." 

My firefighting family will be happy to learn that. 

Comment by Daniel Wachenheim on September 19, 2016 at 8:33pm
Joan, thanks for the info. nI have a few test - plants of Echinacea to see if deer and rabbits eat them. I also have little seedlings of them in seed medium. Also some perennial hibiscus, lychnis, and rudbeckia. Couldn't help myself :-)

Your info on mullein so very interesting! I had one big plant of mullein last year, and another this year. Very dramatic. I let the leaves self-compost around the plant, to keep those minerals accessible.
Comment by Joan Denoo on September 19, 2016 at 5:56pm

These are the two sites I noticed. Are they quarries?

Comment by Joan Denoo on September 19, 2016 at 4:28pm

Daniel, I propagate Echinacea - Coneflowers by seeds and divisions, using the usual method. I leave the seed heads uncut until spring because they attract Goldfinches. I save what seeds that remain and use them for seeding outside, or seeding inside starting in about February. 

Grandma divided her plants, taking a patch about 6" x 6" and putting it in a new place. She also left the seeds to overwinter and let the plants reseed in the patch. I usually don't go to the effort to divide plants unless it needs dividing. 

"Echinacea comes from the Greek 'echinos' meaning 'hedgehog.'" What an appropriate name for this plant! It looks and feels like a hedgehog! 

This is the echinacea variety I have,  echinacea primadonna deep rose

It glows and shimmers when I look closely at it in the garden. 

Comment by Idaho Spud on September 19, 2016 at 2:48pm

Joan, I don't think that is a sand quarry.  I get my sand from http://www.idahorockandsand.com  They have a large selection of sand, pebbles, and rocks.

No frost here yet, and none in the forecast for the next week.  Lowest temperature has been 39° F.  We can get a frost in September, but the first frost is usually in October.

The only tender plant this year is muskmelon.  I'm growing them in the small greenhouse with the lid open wide.  I only closed it once so far, and the melons seem to be doing fine.

Comment by Joan Denoo on September 19, 2016 at 1:00pm

Randy, sunflowers, dill, and phlox are my favorite flowers for that very reason. I will also add Bee Balm (Monarda), an old-fashioned favorite perennial that grew in Grandma's garden. Bee Balm is deer resistant, very easy to grow, and will attract pollinators like bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds to your garden.

From the mint family, it spreads quickly with shallow roots. Pulling the roots up makes management easy. Don't put the roots in your compost or they will grow all through the pile. That is one chore I gladly prevent. 

I have to confess, ALL flowers give me pleasure.
Comment by Plinius on September 19, 2016 at 12:52pm

I love the mullein family, and I've often tried to sow them but without succes so far.

Comment by Joan Denoo on September 19, 2016 at 12:35pm

Chris, I love your strategy! It sounds like a good plan and hollyhock and poppy seeds make excellent plants for hard to grow places. I would also recommend mullein because it is pretty, likes neglect, appreciates the attention, and the N. American continent received their first seeds from German immigrants during the Colonial period.  It is only fair we reintroduce them back into Europe in the 21st Century. However, I assume they are as prolific in Europe as N. America. 

10 Amazing Health Benefits Of Mullein Tea

mullein uses

When the flowers mature into seeds, cut the seed heads off and throw them in the trash or save the seeds; the plant will grow a new bunch of seed heads before frost. Cut the plants off at ground level at the end of the season and toss them in your compost, if you have one, or in the trash. The reason they are so valuable is the roots grow as deep as the seed heads grow high. The roots bring mineral to the surface of the soil, and your ground will become nourished, and the dead roots act as organic matter as it rots. Oh! I love this plant!

Sadly, people think it is a weed and lose the benefits it provides. The seedlings are very easy to pull up the first year and impossible to pull up the second year. 

It is a biennial; it forms the root and plants the first year and then grows the blossoms/seeds the second year, then dies. 


Comment by Daniel Wachenheim on September 19, 2016 at 12:23pm
randy, are any of your varieties family heirlooms?
Comment by Daniel Wachenheim on September 19, 2016 at 12:01pm
Knowing that folks save seeds and plant them gives me a kind of hope. That makes me feel good! For me it's a lot of fun. I wish that I started sooner, although some things do go back 20 years, like the ginkgo trees I grew and the Chinese chives that grew from seeds I saved over several years.

I should add, if the rain doesn't make them moldy, I might save cosmos and rudbeckia seeds.

The squash flowers were not covered and I pollinated the female flowers with whatever males were blooming, so who knows what would grow from those. Might try a few for novelty sake.

Joan, do you plant your echinacea in spring or fall? I started some in late summer, tine plants right now but they should survive.

Chris, that sounds like what some call guerrilla gardening. I should do that too. Around here, daffodils bloom by the roadside. They are not native, so I imagine someone p,anted them there.

Unfortunately, my hollyhocks always wind up ugly from mold disease and deer foraging. I would like to grow them, but this isn't the place.

Have a great day everyone!
 

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