Godless in the garden

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Godless in the garden

Welcome to gardeners, growers of veggies, fruits, flowers, and trees!  

 

Welcome  backyard hen enthusiasts, worm farmers, beekeepers & composters!

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 175
Latest Activity: 2 hours ago

Welcome to Eden!

If you like to dig in the dirt, plant & prune, grow food & flowers, or sit and watch as someone else does your landscaping, you'll find something here to discuss!

Selected topics, in sort of alphabetical order:
Aging.  Gardening with an older body.
bees.  insectary.  insectsbee gardening. Beneficial insects.  insects drive evolution

Compost.  herecontaminated compost.

Backyard Chickens here. here. here. here.

Edible yard.  here  urban farmfront yards.
Growing Fruits

Folklore.

Fragrance and Scenthere.
Fruit growing.  in a small space, by backyard orchard culture.
Frugal gardening.  labels.

Gardening for future generations.  also permaculture, trees, historic varieties, soil

Hegelkultur here, here, here

Heritage and historic varieties.   heresources

locally grown plants to prevent blight transmission here.

Moon Phase Widget here. Moon phase topic here.

PeppersHot peppers.

Permaculture MollisonFalk  Liu, Joan's IntroTransformation in 90 days, Perm Principles at work. Food forest, Holzer

Potatoes.  here.

Rooftop gardening.  here

Seed starting. starting spring crops.

Scientific Gardening.   The Informed Gardener.  The truth about garden remedies.

Soil and soil building - healthy soil microbes, mycelium, dirt is everything, soil analysissoil pH.
Squirrels.

Synergies.

Tomatoes.  Myths and truths

Trees.  Tree tunnels.  Ancient tree planting. Plant commemorative trees

Discussion Forum

Feeling like a fish back in water.

Started by amer chohan. Last reply by amer chohan 2 hours ago. 4 Replies

The Hen in Winter

Started by Daniel W. Last reply by k.h. ky Aug 18. 11 Replies

Soil: regenerative land management

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Joan Denoo Aug 10. 11 Replies

Compact Bed Geometry

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner Jul 29. 0 Replies

Permaculture

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Joan Denoo Jul 21. 3 Replies

Mullein

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Plinius Jul 18. 1 Reply

To cure your garlic

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Randall Smith Jul 16. 1 Reply

Harvesting vegetables

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Idaho Spud Jul 9. 4 Replies

Comment Wall

Comment

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Comment by Joan Denoo on March 15, 2015 at 3:52pm

Come to think of it, Casa Blanka = house white

Therefore, Pneuma tranquillo.

Comment by Idaho Spud on March 15, 2015 at 3:48pm

I like the looks of those beautiful living fences Joan.

Comment by Idaho Spud on March 15, 2015 at 3:45pm

If I put up a privacy screen here, it will limit the sunlight to my garden that already is limited by my house, so I guess I'd rather grow more to eat than have privacy.

The next move I make will be to a place with enough land to grow a large garden, and if it's close to other people, I will definitely put in privacy screens.

As far as dogs and cats, I think a good screen would be some blackberries with nasty thorns.  I could eat them also (harvested with tough gloves and long sleeves), so they would do double duty.

Comment by Joan Denoo on March 15, 2015 at 3:44pm

if you look in another area, contact the County Extension Agent for a list appropriate for that area.

For ideas of a living fence.

Comment by Joan Denoo on March 15, 2015 at 3:33pm

Spud, one way to gain privacy, as you already know, but I just want to remind you. Daniel used lilacs, I think, to put a screen between him and his neighbors. Do you have a native plant/shrub/tree that grows naturally in your soils that you could plant along a property line, close enough together to give you a good screen? 

When I designed my garden, I put trees and lilacs all around the perimeter. It not only screened out noise, but dust from the arterial just a half block from my home. What it did not do was screen out cats and dogs. For some reason, dogs like to poo on cabbage plants, so I built a fence on the property line. Now I have poo-free cabbages. It irked me that I had to go to the expense of keeping poo off my plants instead of dog owners keeping their dogs in their yards. That is life, I guess. 

Here are some fencing ideas with plants that may interest you. Willows will not be a good choice for you, I suspect, because it likes water. I have a soggy part of the garden and I could have used willow, there. Now I am not so sure because the water that used to flow above ground seasonally no longer exists. 

best plants for living fence

You might look around your area where you want to live and look for living fences that seem to be successful. 

In Spokane, arborvitae is good only if there is an abundant and consistent water supply. Many shrubs without enough water look terrible and they die back. I have arborvitae with a soaker hose that I have on a timer 

If you plan to stay in Pocatello, you could contact the Pocatello Tree Commission for ideas. 

City of Pocatello MASTER LIST OF ACCEPTABLE TREES

Comment by Joan Denoo on March 15, 2015 at 2:01pm

Daniel, I am still amazed at the amount of energy you have. I just putter and feel like I have done a day's work. You work full time, then order and plant trees and all the other things you do. How do you accomplish all of this? 

Comment by Joan Denoo on March 15, 2015 at 2:00pm

Spud! Yes! That is a perfect solution. You can have a very comfortable home in this type of building, you can have enough room for tool storage and supplies. If you have some cats, you can be free of mice. If you have some dogs, you will be free of coyotes or whatever prowls your grounds. 

With vines growing over, it will help to insulate from the heat. I don't know about winter protection with plants, but insulation will take care of that!

Comment by Joan Denoo on March 15, 2015 at 1:52pm

Randy, I can't think of a word for woodchip farming that starts with "Lig...."

Daniel introduced me to an author that backs up her claims with laboratory research. Her name is Linda Chalker-Scott, Ph.D, WSU editor Extension Urban Horticulturist and Associate Professor, Puyallup Research and Extension Center, Washington State University Puyallup, Washington.
Wood chip mulch: Landscape boon or bane?

There is a section of this article that addresses the concerns about using wood chips:

"Drawbacks of wood chips— mulch ado about nothing. There are a number of concerns ...."

She answered every question I had about wood chips.

Comment by Idaho Spud on March 15, 2015 at 12:50pm

Joan, glad to hear you got some gardening time in and are now refreshed.

Comment by Idaho Spud on March 15, 2015 at 12:46pm

Yes Joan, you are close to correct.  A cottage has always seemed like an attractive vision to me.  Practically, I would probably go for a used barn or mobile home, but what I've mostly been thinking about is a steel farm building converted into a home.  It seems like the best combination of affordable and quick & easy to assemble.  It would probably even look nice, if surrounded by green growing things, with vines climbing over it:

 

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