Godless in the garden


Godless in the garden

Discussing all aspect of gardening.

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Latest Activity: Feb 28

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Comment by kathy: ky on May 15, 2017 at 10:29am
That's the easiest way. And I'm afraid if I dig them up to separate them they won't transplant well. They have a good start but it's late in the year, here, to transplants trees.
I just don't want the clipped one to start growing again.
Trees are not my thing.
Comment by Randall Smith on May 15, 2017 at 7:01am

Kathy, me thinks you should be able to separate the roots successfully, even if it means destroying parts of the root systems. Just rip them apart! When replanted, keep watering them.

As for my new trees, Daniel, four of five are doing great. They're all leafted out. However, my pecan tree, which came bare-rooted, shows no sign of life. I'm disheartened, especially since it cost me over $75! And my new goji bush was eaten down by rabbits. Grrrr.  My "old" fruit trees are loaded, except the early blooming apricots. As usual, there's nothing on them.

My vegetable garden is pretty much all planted. Only sweet potatoes to put in. Things took off with this stretch of warm temps. My early corn, however, didn't make it--only one row planted. Oh yes, and over half my beans didn't germinate. I should know by now, it doesn't pay to get an early start. The soil is just too cold.

Comment by kathy: ky on May 14, 2017 at 11:01pm
Question folks,
I have two peach trees that started in the same small hole from pits They are growing in the yard and doing very well. I know I've got to separate them but how?? If I had caught them sooner I would have taken one out from the root.
Will it cause a mess if I clip one out??
The double root system is what concerns me. I don't want the clipped one to return over the years and ruin the trunk of the remaining one. I know from past experience that two trees don't grow well when they started as seedlings together.
They just started growing last fall and are only able two ft high. The trunks are about the size of a small straw.
Trees are not my thing. I live in the woods and am constantly having to chop, snip or cut seedlings out that have started in flower beds, under rocks and anyplace else they land long enough :(
Comment by Idaho Spud on May 14, 2017 at 8:02am

I just put down 5 fresh glue boards to see if that will catch it.

Comment by Idaho Spud on May 14, 2017 at 8:01am

Ugh!  I think I have another mouse loose in the house.  I heard the radar dog I've got outside my bedroom bark several times last night and this morning I found a little peanut butter missing from a trap although it was not triggered.  Another trap was triggered, but no mouse was in it.

Comment by Idaho Spud on May 14, 2017 at 7:48am

I try not to root-till my garden anymore either randy.  I've also concluded that it probably does more damage than good.

Comment by Randall Smith on May 14, 2017 at 7:08am

All good information. Thanks.

I don't roto-till my garden before planting. So the plot doesn't look all clean and fluffy. I read where tilling does more damage than good. And I usually have decent results. When weeds get out of control, I may run the tiller through the rows. That is, if I can get it started!

Comment by Joan Denoo on May 13, 2017 at 11:50pm

Permaculture is a style of life.

"Permaculture is a system of design for sustainable and ecological living by integrating plants, animals, buildings, people, and communities."

Comment by Joan Denoo on May 13, 2017 at 11:42pm

Daniel, I agree that gardening depends on so many variables, one has to be responsive to whatever element presents. I, too, had a year and half of horticulture at a Land Grant College and had to learn a very different form of gardening when I discoveed Permaculture and the use of nature and natural processes to get the kind of results I wanted. I learned a great deal by gardening with my Dad and both grandmothers. They used a lot of folk methods that seemed to work. When I have a problem with a plant, I often sit down and remember what they did. That is a great way to learn. 

Over the years, I forget what I learned at college, unless it is so deeply engrained in my mind I don't realize it. But I remember, vividly, what I learned from my elders. 

In some ways I wish we had life after death so that I could tell them how valuable they are to me today and how grateful I am for having them as family. I also wish I could tell them how hurtful the interpersonal relations were for me and that families can live without violence. 

Communication between and within the family members now are much healthier. We manage conflict and problems much better than the previous generation. 

Growing a garden using no-till methods and growing a family using interpersonal skill, result in different outcomes than using tilling methods of farming and authoritarian methods of child rearing.

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Comment by kathy: ky on May 13, 2017 at 11:32pm
Joan I only have one four year old Boston terrier now. The best thing she has learned is to stay out of the flower beds :) She's always with me and gives a very soft 'woof' if something is around that shouldn't be. If people show up unexpectedly she acts like a big dog barking and growling. She sounds like a big dog too. But with stray snakes, turtles, racoons, etc she just calls my attention to it and waits for me. I love animals. Especially dogs. Boston's are very good natured and love children.
My oldest gdaughter (14) happily helps with weeding, planting, and other yard chores. She always has. The younger one (12) only likes tending to the chickens and dog. So they balance each other out. But they both like the compost and are willing to help out with it. They have since they were toddlers. I've promised the 14 year old a small compost bin to work cold compost at her house. Just a simple wooden frame about 2ftx2ft with a depth of about two feet.
My daughter uses chemicals and is not into flowers or gardens at all. It's just more work for her. Her job is swing shift with a two day turn around, and three hour drive round trip. With two in school she doesn't really have time.
I just realized today that I don't have tomato plants out. With my husband undergoing treatment, the cold temps, and the rain, I hadn't given it a thought. They are usually in the ground for already for a couple of weeks. I plan on picking up a couple tomorrow.
Most of the shrubs have been pruned, flower beds mostly weeded, and sunflowers I sewed in the hugelkulture beds during the fall are already about two feet tall. I have some bare spots I need to reseed and that's all I'll have time for this year.
Doctors appointments and cold weather have brought gardening to a slow crawl this season.
I've got to agree that Daniel puts a lot of time in the yard and garden. The growing season is much shorter where you two live.
Here we usually start the first week of May, earlier some years, and garden as late as mid to late October. I've had green peppers and tomatoes ripening as late as mid November before. But by then they are getting tough.

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