Godless in the garden

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Godless in the garden

Welcome to gardeners, growers of veggies, fruits, flowers, and trees, backyard hen enthusiasts, worm farmers, & composters!

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 181
Latest Activity: 11 minutes ago

Welcome to Eden!

If you like to dig in the dirt, grow flowers, putter around the yard, dig in the kitchen garden, raise backyard hens, or just like daydreaming about the garden, this is the place.

Many topics have been discussed in the archive.  Revive a topic by adding your 2¢ or start a new topic.

Everyone likes photos of the garden, so if you like to share photos of your prize dahlia, your favorite hen, or your first tomato, go right ahead!

Discussion Forum

Homestead Automation: Automating the Chickshaw Part 1

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Joan Denoo on Wednesday. 1 Reply

Hope in the Middle of Big Ag

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Randall Smith Aug 3. 1 Reply

Comment Wall

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Comment by Idaho Spud on February 13, 2017 at 10:56am

The heavy snowfall has melted due to temperatures the last few days being above freezing at night and well above freezing in the day.

Time for me to start my cold weather plants in pots.  I've given up putting the seeds directly in the garden.  Something destroys most of them, so I give them a good start in pots first, then they usually do well in the garden.

Comment by kathy: ky on February 13, 2017 at 10:46am
Joan, hope all went well and you will soon be good as new.

Sf
Comment by Randall Smith on February 13, 2017 at 7:38am

Joan, good luck with the new pacemaker! I hope it lasts for several more presidents, not just one.

For the most part, it's been a snow-free winter here. Snow plow guys have been complaining, since it's a good source of extra income.

I may have to consider tossing in a few cold tolerant seeds into the garden myself. First, I have to clean it up from last year. 

Did I mention I harvested over 600 almonds, about half of which were any good? It's a chore removing the hulls and hammering the actual seed to get to the almond. After all that work, I almost hate eating them. I want them to last!

Comment by Joan Denoo on February 13, 2017 at 12:00am

It seems spring is coming into your neighborhoods if the discussion about acid and alkaline soils, seeds, and pee for the garden are the topics of discussion.  

We are still under 2 feet of snow in the meadow outside my bedroom window, the plow has piled up 4 to 12 feet of snow, depending on where the plow has been, The high today was 32° F and the present temperature is 17°.  We expect 38° high for tomorrow. 

We lost a roof to snow yesterday that damaged several of our farm machines. One was an old golf cart that we used to load up with tools to take into the forest when we are cutting out slash or downing trees. We also use it to go to the mailbox. It will be several days before we get it dug out and determine if it is still usable. The frame and roof are smashed. Hopefully the motor and seat part are salvageable. 

We have a Kawasaki "Mule" in another shed and the whole family went out clearing snow off of roofs of the outbuildings. Even the dogs got in on the act. I stayed inside and kept the coffee, tea, and sandwiches flowing. 

I have heart surgery tomorrow so the family is kind of protecting me from work! It is a simple procedure of recharging my pacemaker. I have good long service from my first one; 7 or 8 years, I forget. That one cost $45,000 from Medicare; I hope the new one will last until we get a new president and congress. 

Comment by Daniel W on February 12, 2017 at 9:50pm

Randy with acid soil, ashes or lime are verboten, as you wisely observe.  Do you ever check the pH?  Have the years of gardening, watering, and acid rain, lowered the pH?

Supposedly the maritime Pacific NW soil is so acidic due to eons of rain, leaching out the alkaline minerals.  I dont know if I can see benefit from my adding ashes or lime, but I really saw an accelleration of growth ftom peecycling.  That can add sodium, so if your soil has high salinity, that should be taken into account.  Mine is very low salinity.

Today I planted chill tolerant lettuce, mesclun, and radishes.  Might be jumping the gun.  Those went into a raised bed constructed last year from cement blocks.  It really warns the soil.  Tomorrow's plan is to plant peas, snowpeas, and favas.  Those can take to chill too.

I think I buried mg soil thermometer somewhere.  What a space cadet.

Comment by Randall Smith on February 10, 2017 at 7:30am

I've mentioned it before, but my garden soil is just the opposite of yours, Daniel. It's got a winter cover of pine needles. I never spread ashes on mine. I need to start saving urine again. 

Comment by Daniel W on February 9, 2017 at 9:58am

sorry for all of tge typos.  big fingers on little keypad.

Comment by Daniel W on February 9, 2017 at 9:57am

Joan, I hope the weather lets up soon!  I would love to see you out in the garden beds!

I completed ckearing the be blackberry thicket.  I think I started that about Dec 2014 but didnt work on it summer or fall.  Most will be pkanted with grass seed, I buy the cheapest I can find and mix in clover seeds.  Blackberries will continue growing from roots and crowns, buy mowing the grass repeatedly will kill them off for good. 

I also bought some phlox roots, ridbeckia roots, and peonies to plant at the woods edge.  So far, my experience has been that deer, rabbits, and voles dont eat peonies or rudbeckia.  I dont know about the phlox.

Today I will spread wood ashes on the vegetable garden.  Wood ashes are highest in Calcium, then Potassium, then other major and minor essential minerals, and highly alkaline.  By anslysis, my soil is vety acidic - pH 5.3, very calcium deficient, borderline magnesium deficient, but high in potassium.  I read that I can apply about 5 pounds per 3 square feet but will use about half that, for vegetable beds and around trees.  Just not around where potatoes will be grown this yeat, because fresh ashes or lime can promote potato scab.  I already applied lime to some beds, no ashes will go to those locations.

Comment by Idaho Spud on February 8, 2017 at 10:26am

Randall, my dad did that too, but I don't think he was being crafty.  I think he liked them.  Besides butter and salt, he also used pepper, so that's how I eat them.

They do taste good fresh and crisp from the oven.

Comment by Randall Smith on February 8, 2017 at 7:38am

My dad taught us kids to remove the potatoe's peel, add butter and salt, and eat. He made it seem it was a special treat just to get us to eat the skin. Pretty crafty.

I'm getting pretty antsy to get out in the garden. It looks so bleak right now.

 

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