Godless in the garden

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Godless in the garden

Welcome to gardeners, growers of veggies, fruits, flowers, and trees, backyard hen enthusiasts, worm farmers, & composters!

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 179
Latest Activity: 3 hours ago

Welcome to Eden!

If you like to dig in the dirt, grow flowers, putter around the yard, dig in the kitchen garden, raise backyard hens, or just like daydreaming about the garden, this is the place.

Many topics have been discussed in the archive.  Revive a topic by adding your 2¢ or start a new topic.

Everyone likes photos of the garden, so if you like to share photos of your prize dahlia, your favorite hen, or your first tomato, go right ahead!

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Comment by Daniel W on May 8, 2017 at 8:59pm

I think I lost most of the pears to constant rain during pollination season.  Not worried about it, there are lots of other things to enjoy.  That's one reason I grow a diversity, so if one does bad there are others. 

More lilac photos form the lilac hedge.  We bought tiny lilac plants in about 2003, and these are the result.  Soon  they will be done blooming.  Some are fragrant.  The last one came with the house, and who knows?  Maybe it was a start from someone's grandmothers lilac planted when the house was built.  This bush is massive, deer don't touch it, and after I cut out the dead wood, it regenerated vigorously.  My grandmother had a blue lilac, but the pictured blue one isn't hers.  That would have been nice to keep but you can't have everything :-)

Comment by k.h. ky on May 7, 2017 at 9:22am
Randy, you missed a lot of unsesonable cold. Washington State is growing things and we're stagnant. My butterfly weed were set to bloom but after five days of temps in the low forties/mid fifties with nothing but rain and clouds they may die off before they bloom.
But my Joe Pye weed has survived and is spreading.
Joan, I don't have a fear of snakes. They are more afraid of us then we are of them :)
The only large ones I see are usually the black snakes. Some of them pass through here are about six feet long. I just walk on by them. The are very beneficial and feed on the moles, voles, mice and other varmints that ruin the garden and flower beds. Sunshine for the first time in five days and the temp may rise to seventy !
Daniel, I love the ducks. If my niece with the mini farm saw them she would have to have some.
Comment by Randall Smith on May 7, 2017 at 7:03am

Evidently, it was quite cold here while I was gone. My garden didn't show much progress. Trees leafed out, and I see little fruits! Yeah!

Comment by Idaho Spud on May 7, 2017 at 4:11am

Beautiful Lilacs.

Comment by Daniel W on May 6, 2017 at 10:06pm

Joan, thank you for the updates!  Yesterday I checked the soil temperature, it was in the 80s.  So I planted the first batch of sweet corn seeds.  I chose a variety that tolerates cooler weather and has a short growth season, "Trinity".  This is my third year with that variety.  My peppers are a couple of inches tall, and my tomatoes are about 4 inches tall and growing fast.

Here are some pics of lilacs in our yard.  Last year I moved them 35 miles to the country place, and they seemed to settle in OK.  Deer eat some of the new sprouts, but I think they are doing OK.  The flower close ups don't show how scraggly they are.  I think they will fill in, in a couple of years.

That last one is rather vivid for a lilac.  It's a repeat - blooming Korean lilac called "Bloomerang", a fairly recent introduction. 

Comment by Joan Denoo on May 6, 2017 at 7:48pm

I have had a glorious few days in the greenhouse and garden. We finally have some warm weather, heavy spring rains, flooding in the community. The greenhouse tomatoes are doing fine, but the peppers just are not sprouting. I am going to do the paper towel test today to see if the seeds are viable. I put in many different kinds over the past few weeks. Hope they don't all decide to sprout at once. The space for the hot peppers is at the opposite end of the greenhouse than the sweet ones.
Dominic and I have his grooming session on the front porch now that the morning temperature is comfortable. His black coat shines beautiful colors of brown lightly mixes in with black. We think he might be part German Shepherd; he was a rescue dog.
Laura and Larry pull slash from the forest and burn much of it. Burning will be allowed a few more weeks if the predicted weather holds true.
Daniel, you have the best of both worlds, chickens to keep the ground scratched and fertilized and ducks to eat slugs and bugs!
I have been watching videos by gardeners; one Daniel introduced us to many months ago, the other new to me:

Bill Mollison, Permaculture Lecture Series, On-Line
http://www.networkearth.org/perma/culture.html#Permaculture

Linda Chalker-Scott, Horticultural Myths
https://puyallup.wsu.edu/lcs/

I AM ORGANIC GARDENING
WHY No Till Gardening Works Best with living roots, Organic Vegetable Gardening for Beginners 101.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=18HriHYr53A&list=PLUKzcNTgpg9Uk...


I Think I shared this one with you before.

These videos contain a lot of watching time. However, they provide valid and reliable information.

Comment by Daniel W on May 4, 2017 at 5:11pm

Joan, Im curious and skeptical about that claim.  They dont scratch in the ground like chickens, they have webbed feet.  But they do like eating greens.  Im curious about how easy they will be to herd around the yard to do their dlug and bug hunting.

Comment by Daniel W on May 4, 2017 at 5:09pm

I think that sweet corn should not be planted here until June.  I didnt write down when I started planting it last year.  Maybe early May?  Today I measured the soil temperature as 80 in ground and 84 in raised bed.  So I planted the first batch of sweet corn seeds.  I plan to plant 5 batches, 2 or 3 weeks apart. 

Spud those are good looking tools.  I should check Winco too.

I thought it would be too much raising ducklings on top of raising hens, but Ive been thinking about it for years.  I think the eggs would be popular if we have too many.

Checking the persimmon growth, it looks like they will bloom again this year.  Even the grafted tiny branches have flower buds.  Spring is absoultely well underway.

Comment by Joan Denoo on May 4, 2017 at 1:55pm

Daniel, your ducklings make me smile. Do they eat the same food as chickens? Many of the permaculture programs show a flock of running ducks. 

Your garden will benefit and I understand running ducks don't pull plants out of the ground. I'm curious about that claim. 

Runner Ducks

Comment by Joan Denoo on May 4, 2017 at 1:34pm

Kathy, your description of snakes in your garden makes me shiver, even as I realize some can be beneficial. We have rattle snakes in NE Washington state. We lived in Texas for several years. The thought of the children, who were small at the time, playing in forests and creeks gave me nightmares. We had coral snakes that hid under rocks and in crevaces. Another danger they faces was Recluse spiders. Laura had one of their bites and we had to have a surgical procedure to cut out the spreading necrotic tissue. 

Maria Gimbutas fed her garden snakes milk. She told incredible  stories about the mythology of snakes in Old Europe. 

Marija Gimbutas Language of the Goddess

You said, "Rattlesnakes are endangered species in ky."

I respond with a, "Good News!"

 

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