Godless in the garden

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Godless in the garden

Welcome to gardeners, growers of veggies, fruits, flowers, and trees!  

 

Welcome  backyard hen enthusiasts, worm farmers, beekeepers & composters!

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 174
Latest Activity: 39 minutes ago

Welcome to Eden!

If you like to dig in the dirt, plant & prune, grow food & flowers, or sit and watch as someone else does your landscaping, you'll find something here to discuss!

Selected topics, in sort of alphabetical order:
Aging.  Gardening with an older body.
bees.  insectary.  insectsbee gardening. Beneficial insects.  insects drive evolution

Compost.  herecontaminated compost.

Backyard Chickens here. here. here. here.

Edible yard.  here  urban farmfront yards.
Growing Fruits

Folklore.

Fragrance and Scenthere.
Fruit growing.  in a small space, by backyard orchard culture.
Frugal gardening.  labels.

Gardening for future generations.  also permaculture, trees, historic varieties, soil

Hegelkultur here, here, here

Heritage and historic varieties.   heresources

locally grown plants to prevent blight transmission here.

Moon Phase Widget here. Moon phase topic here.

PeppersHot peppers.

Permaculture MollisonFalk  Liu, Joan's IntroTransformation in 90 days, Perm Principles at work. Food forest, Holzer

Potatoes.  here.

Rooftop gardening.  here

Seed starting. starting spring crops.

Scientific Gardening.   The Informed Gardener.  The truth about garden remedies.

Soil and soil building - healthy soil microbes, mycelium, dirt is everything, soil analysissoil pH.
Squirrels.

Synergies.

Tomatoes.  Myths and truths

Trees.  Tree tunnels.  Ancient tree planting. Plant commemorative trees

Discussion Forum

Compact Bed Geometry

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner yesterday. 0 Replies

Soil: regenerative land management

Started by Joan Denoo on Tuesday. 0 Replies

Permaculture

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Joan Denoo Jul 21. 3 Replies

Mullein

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Plinius Jul 18. 1 Reply

To cure your garlic

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Randall Smith Jul 16. 1 Reply

Harvesting vegetables

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Idaho Spud Jul 9. 4 Replies

The Hen in Winter

Started by Daniel W. Last reply by k.h. ky Jul 4. 10 Replies

Fruit Pests: Apricot

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Joan Denoo Jun 28. 3 Replies

Sentient Biped's Garden Blog. Happy to add a different feed if there are suggestions.

Comment Wall

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Comment by Plinius on August 17, 2014 at 2:10am

Sauerkraut is good with blue cheese and mushrooms.

Comment by Idaho Spud on August 16, 2014 at 4:19pm

Daniel, your Rose of Sharon seedling is very attractive:

Comment by Randall Smith on August 16, 2014 at 7:21am

Never liked 'kraut, but a good suggestion, Patricia.

Comment by Randall Smith on August 15, 2014 at 7:18am

Did up a batch of sweet corn to freeze yest. Picked, shucked, boiled water, then realized I didn't have enough ice to cool it down quickly. It'll still be good come January. Now what to do with 6 heads of cabbage. I still have freezer slaw from 2012!

Comment by Joan Denoo on August 14, 2014 at 7:52pm

This artist/fruit tree sculptor is amazing. Saving an old orchard of heirloom fruit trees is entitled to some kind of accolade. 

Comment by Joan Denoo on August 14, 2014 at 6:59pm

Čenek, I forgot to mention protecting bees from diatomaceous earth. A light cover over a treated plant when it is in bloom will do the job. 

Comment by Joan Denoo on August 14, 2014 at 6:56pm

Čenek, surely looks like squash bugs to me. The organic way to get rid of them is to squash the squash bug ( no kidding). With the high population, that will be impractical. Food grade diatomaceous earth is recommended for organic gardeners. 

Your healthy leaves look like they are adequate to take care of the needs of the plant, so one option is to cut away the infected leaves and put them in the trash, not the compost. 

Another problem might be your mulch. I mulch my plants heavily, too, but in the case of squash bugs, they like to lay their eggs in the mulch and feed on the leaves. Just pull the mulch away from the plant and clean up any infected leaves. Use a hand pump to distribute diatomaceous earth on the ground, under the leaves and any place the bugs lay their eggs. 

"Winter is spent in the adult stage under sheltering debris in the vicinity of previously infested plantings. Squash bugs become active in warm days during late spring and move to germinating squash. Mating and some feeding occur during this time followed by egg laying, which often begins around mid-June."

Squash Bug: Management in Home Gardens

Organic Squash Bug Control

diatomaceous earth applyer

Comment by Idaho Spud on August 14, 2014 at 11:05am

I'm going to try some delicata squash next year.  

The rain last evening and night game my garden one inch.  Horray!

Comment by Joan Denoo on August 14, 2014 at 9:00am

"A haboob raced through eastern Washington and northern Idaho Tuesday, turning the skies brown with lofted dust, downing trees and power lines, and contributing to a multi-vehicle accident.

"The wall of dust was kicked up by an east-west line of thunderstorms moving north out of northeast Oregon just before 3 p.m. PDT Tuesday. Over a seven-hour period, this band of thunderstorms tracked about 180 miles through eastern Washington and northern Idaho."

A haboob came through Spokane and I didn't even know it. Darn! They are interesting to watch roll in; not any fun to be out in. I pitty those who have to work outdoors when one occurs. 

Washington-Idaho Haboob Blankets Spokane in Dust, Contributes to Mu...

Haboob, stock photo

This is a climate map of Washington state showing the desert  in central Washington, turned into excellent farm land with the introduction of water from Grand Coulee Dam. Spokane is on the eastern border of the state, about a third of the way down, just about where that small green dot is. 

Comment by Daniel W on August 14, 2014 at 7:48am
Randall I will have to look into delicata squash. So far I like the yellow summer squases the best.

My area has been spared most of the really bad weather. Its been a mild summer in this maritime part of the Pacific NW. With climate chaos I thimk we need to enjoy the good times while they last, and try not to worry too much. tues we had awesome thunderstorms.
 

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