Godless in the garden

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Godless in the garden

Discussing all aspect of gardening.

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 181
Latest Activity: yesterday

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Comment by Idaho Spud on September 2, 2016 at 1:53pm

I was reading about the largest desert, the Antarctica, and the article said a desert is defined as receiving less than 9.84 inches of precipitation a year.  It dawned on me that I may live in a desert, but no, I receive 12.1 inches per year.  

Comment by Randall Smith on September 2, 2016 at 7:40am

Daniel, sorry I haven't read your garden blog in awhile. Good update here. No Costco nearby. Think I'll check the internet (dehydrator). My nearest Walmart is 10 miles. The "big city", Spud, is 18 miles away--Lafayette. Indianapolis is 50.

Dug up a lot of potatoes the past 3 days. Looking good. I didn't cut through too many of them. I still have some late plantings to dig. And sweet potatoes to be dug in October.

Comment by Idaho Spud on September 1, 2016 at 7:52am

Randy, how far is Walmart from you, and how far is the "big city"?

Comment by Randall Smith on September 1, 2016 at 6:54am

Daniel, I went to my local Walmart (I know, ugh) recently to look for a dehydrater. Found none, but wound up with a hot air popcorn maker. Looks like I'll have to go to the "big city".

Joan, thanks for the photos plus fruit fly info!

Comment by Joan Denoo on September 1, 2016 at 12:28am

Another young urban family takes to Permaculture and a rural lifestyle. It appears they are new to the tasks, and they have some excellent advisors. The man of the family seems to have carpentry skills. I hope they succeed. 
I suspect the are somewhere near Spokane, although all they reveal so far is their farm is in northeast Washington State. 

Comment by Joan Denoo on August 31, 2016 at 12:30pm

Fruit flies! Swarms of them every summer until I get out my supplies to eradicate the pesky things. 

6 Smart Ways to Kill Fruit Flies

Comment by Joan Denoo on August 31, 2016 at 12:09pm

Hummingbird moth

 

Hummingbird moth caterpillar

Hummingbird moth life cycle

Nature provides many interesting cycles.  

Comment by kathy: ky on August 31, 2016 at 11:15am
Humming bird moths feed on the moonflowers I have in the yard. I always wondered what they were.
Comment by Randall Smith on August 31, 2016 at 6:36am

Daniel, how are you dehydrating your tomatoes? I gave up on my dehydrator and am simply putting them on cookie sheets out in the sun, covered by screens.  

Comment by Randall Smith on August 31, 2016 at 6:34am

Yes, I've seen wasps flying around the tomato plants looking for hornworms. A few worms were already "infected"--white eggs on their bodies. I leave them alone.

And I discovered the moth of the hornworm is a hummingbird moth, quite large (and ugly). So I don't feel too bad about killing the caterpillars. Up to now, I suspect birds have kept the worms at bay. Where did they go?

 

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