Godless in the garden

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Godless in the garden

Discussing all aspect of gardening.

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 182
Latest Activity: on Monday

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Comment by Joan Denoo on November 5, 2017 at 4:34pm

We have had seveal days of snow with thawing midday, leaving us with heavy snow topped with fluff. We now have 12" of snow on the ground. Who knows how much melted away during the daily thaws. 

Our neighbor's horse came over this morning eating his way across the meadow. 

file:///var/folders/sx/h7_9bwc96sdb702ffdwx7qsm0000gn/T/IMG_1141.jpg

Comment by Patricia on November 4, 2017 at 6:36pm

Black seems to block light enough so the herbs retain colour & the flavour is very good.

Comment by Patricia on November 4, 2017 at 6:20pm

Sounds good Daniel.

I like to dry several things, & have done really well with drying herbs in black cotton towels.

Comment by Patricia on November 3, 2017 at 4:46pm

The flavours are really nice Spud.

Comment by Idaho Spud on November 3, 2017 at 4:29pm

Nice looking pepper, Daniel.  I've never cooked with them and so don't grow them.  I've been thinking lately that I should try cooking with some.

Comment by Patricia on November 3, 2017 at 1:52pm

How do you keep the peppers through the winter, Daniel? Cooked, frozen, dried......

Comment by Joan Denoo on November 3, 2017 at 4:56am

Daniel, I agree, green tomatoes ripened indoor is better than store bought ones. 

We have our first snow, a nice covering on everything. Animal tracks reveal a very busy meadow.

Comment by Joan Denoo on November 1, 2017 at 5:42pm

Thomas, Larry, my son-in-law, has wanted a greenhouse for years. We considered a more traditional model, and he was intrigued by the geodesic dome design. 

I have been a Buckminster "Bucky" Fuller fan for many years and Larry liked the looks and physics of his design. We hoped it would compensate for the far northern location; however, we have to close down the greenhouse and drain the water tank, usually in November, before the ground freezes. 

I start my plants inside in my bedroom and then transplant them out to the greenhouse in May and June. I am able to start seeds in the dome from then on into autumn. 

Tomatoes do very well, as do the brassicas, but they take up a lot of room with their huge growth. Peppers have not grown at all well, even when I started them in my bedroom. Beets, cabbage, and kale do extremely well and there is not one bug or disease on any of them, so far. 

I plant pollinators in the greenhouse and that seemed to be enough to get blossoms to form into fruits. Toads come in on their own and are welcome creatures. Raccoon tore the first year's garden to pieces and we put screens on the ventilator windows and that kept them out. 

The geodesic dome kit is expensive and I am sure one could build one from scratch for less money. We have no one on the place skilled in that craft, so L&L hired a friend to build it for us. 

Growing Spaces

The first year, I retuned to Spokane to care for my dying son and Larry didn't know how to manage tomatoes. When I came back the greenhouse was completely full of tomato plants. 

This year, I kept the tomato vines pruned and we had an abundance of fruit, all delicious. I have now harvested all the green tomatoes and have them ripening in the kitchen. They aren't as good as vine ripened, but I didn't want to leave them out there any longer. We had some fried green tomatoes and left the rest to ripen. 

Geodesic dome greenhouse, tool shed, white and red fir and western larch. 

Comment by Patricia on November 1, 2017 at 5:25pm

Oh Joan, such beauty is breathtaking!

Comment by Joan Denoo on November 1, 2017 at 5:07pm

Spud, L&L's acrage is deep in he Colville National Forest. This land was clear cut in the early part of the last century. This acreage is regrowth mostly white and red fir with a generous splattering of western larch which turn to a brilliant yellow in the fall. The needles drop and regrow needles in the spring. Some people call them tamarack, but they are not that species, they are western larch (Larix occidentalis).

This is a stock photo 

 

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