Godless in the garden

Information

Godless in the garden

Welcome to gardeners, growers of veggies, fruits, flowers, and trees!  

 

Welcome  backyard hen enthusiasts, worm farmers, beekeepers & composters!

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 175
Latest Activity: 7 hours ago

Welcome to Eden!

If you like to dig in the dirt, plant & prune, grow food & flowers, or sit and watch as someone else does your landscaping, you'll find something here to discuss!

Selected topics, in sort of alphabetical order:
Aging.  Gardening with an older body.
bees.  insectary.  insectsbee gardening. Beneficial insects.  insects drive evolution

Compost.  herecontaminated compost.

Backyard Chickens here. here. here. here.

Edible yard.  here  urban farmfront yards.
Growing Fruits

Folklore.

Fragrance and Scenthere.
Fruit growing.  in a small space, by backyard orchard culture.
Frugal gardening.  labels.

Gardening for future generations.  also permaculture, trees, historic varieties, soil

Hegelkultur here, here, here

Heritage and historic varieties.   heresources

locally grown plants to prevent blight transmission here.

Moon Phase Widget here. Moon phase topic here.

PeppersHot peppers.

Permaculture MollisonFalk  Liu, Joan's IntroTransformation in 90 days, Perm Principles at work. Food forest, Holzer

Potatoes.  here.

Rooftop gardening.  here

Seed starting. starting spring crops.

Scientific Gardening.   The Informed Gardener.  The truth about garden remedies.

Soil and soil building - healthy soil microbes, mycelium, dirt is everything, soil analysissoil pH.
Squirrels.

Synergies.

Tomatoes.  Myths and truths

Trees.  Tree tunnels.  Ancient tree planting. Plant commemorative trees

Discussion Forum

The Top 10 Things To Do In Your Garden This Fall

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Joan Denoo 7 hours ago. 15 Replies

The Hen in Winter

Started by Daniel W. Last reply by k.h. ky Aug 18. 11 Replies

Soil: regenerative land management

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Joan Denoo Aug 10. 11 Replies

Compact Bed Geometry

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner Jul 29. 0 Replies

Permaculture

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Joan Denoo Jul 21. 3 Replies

Mullein

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Plinius Jul 18. 1 Reply

To cure your garlic

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Randall Smith Jul 16. 1 Reply

Harvesting vegetables

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Idaho Spud Jul 9. 4 Replies

Comment Wall

Comment

You need to be a member of Godless in the garden to add comments!

Comment by k.h. ky on June 15, 2014 at 12:26pm
My dog, Sam, dug up the last of my black hollyhocks last year. I hate it when that happens.
Comment by k.h. ky on June 15, 2014 at 12:22pm
Sentient, that runs wild in ky. You can see fields of them. I can't remember the name though.
Comment by Daniel W on June 15, 2014 at 12:05pm

Barbara, the other photos are a few pages back on comments now.  That's something I love about this group - there is so much active conversation.  I feel among friends and neighbors.

Anyone know this weed?  It comes up among the flower borders and in vegetable beds.  It is not invasive - only a few here and there, and growth is compact.  They have a pretty flower, either blue or pink.

Comment by Daniel W on June 15, 2014 at 8:42am
Randall, thats what makes it great! Gardening is in full season!

I think the midwest and Northeast must be prime hollyhock growing country. Each year I try something new, either plant or technique. Sometimes several things. Now that the four o'clocks look like tey are sbout to start blooming, and the scallop and other squashes are growing, time for something new. I have never seen hollyhocks here. I read, rabbits snd slugs like them. I will plan for those. It will be interesting to start them now, for next year.

I got everbearing strawberries a few years ago. Not as productive by far, but they continue through the sumner here. We are getting a lot now.

Joan I would love to try those Turkish hollyhocks! That would be really special for me. If you think of it when they seed, i will plant them in both pkaces. Thank you!

Blooming now - Ning's wildflower meadow, especially poppies of all kinds. Daylilies. Lilies. Roses. Meyer lemon - in container, overwinter indoors. very fragrant.
Comment by Randall Smith on June 15, 2014 at 7:50am

Too many topics all at once!! 

On hollyhocks, they come up "wild" in my garden. Can't remember ever planting them on purpose. Same with sunflowers. I "wee" hundreds of them every spring, but leave one or two just to keep them coming--I suppose for the finches.

Barbara, cacti are out of my territory, both in knowledge and climate.

Spud, my strawberry season is coming to an end. I froze several gallons, however (unwashed, with stems). There used to be a wild patch nearby, but it's gone. Talk about sweet berries--but very small and tedious to pick.

Happy Fathers Day to all the fathers out there.

Comment by Joan Denoo on June 15, 2014 at 1:14am

Daniel, my grandmother had hollyhock growing out behind the chicken coop. They came back from seed every year. So when I brought home all those hollyhock seeds from Turkey, I just threw them on the ground. Didn't even cover them or stir the soil. They came up the first year and then I stared sorting the seeds by color. I put a colored ribbon on each stem revealing the color of the blossom. In the autumn, after the blossoms died, I cut the yellow ribbon ones and threw the whole stalk on the eastern part of my garden. The red ribbon ones I cut and threw the stalk with seed heads on the southern garden. Well, now, several years later, I have hollyhocks coming up everywhere; The birds didn't seem to like my color scheme and scattered all the colors all over the garden. I don't have any ripe seeds now, but I will mail you some in the fall. It will be fun having my experience in Turkey get shared in Vancouver or Battle Ground, WA 

Comment by Plinius on June 15, 2014 at 1:05am

I've tried to grow hollyhocks for five years, without succes. Bought small plants - they disappeared, tried seeds - they never grew. And this year, now that I have no time for my garden, there)s a hollyhock, almost as tall as I am! Will send pic when the flowers are open.

Comment by Idaho Spud on June 14, 2014 at 4:58pm

Yes, they have a much better nose and ears than I do!

Comment by Barbara Livingston on June 14, 2014 at 4:54pm

Spud, I'm not sure, but you may well be right. I thought it was also interesting that 12 million mothers leave the cave each night and return at sunrise - and each mother is able to find her own baby among the 12 million babies by smell and sound. I doubt I could find my offspring by sound and smell among 12 million others.  Mind boggling. Having fathers in the cave would just add to the chaos, LOL  www.batcon.org. I haven't read entire site, maybe answer is there.  

Comment by Idaho Spud on June 14, 2014 at 4:42pm

I've been meaning to say that most of my life I've known bats were our friends, and I've always found them fascinating.

I just read an article on bats that said the mothers find places that are warm to raise the hairless infants.  That made me think that the male bats probably live outside because there's not enough room for them inside.

 

Members (174)

 
 
 

© 2015   Atheist Nexus. All rights reserved. Admin: Richard Haynes.

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service