Godless in the garden

Information

Godless in the garden

Discussing all aspect of gardening.

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 181
Latest Activity: 11 hours ago

Comment Wall

Comment

You need to be a member of Godless in the garden to add comments!

Comment by Randall Smith on February 16, 2016 at 7:17am

Thanks for the tips, you all.  Fava beans, eh? I just might have to try them.

Comment by Bertold Brautigan on February 15, 2016 at 4:17pm

Daniel -- fresh fava beans are wonderful. Years ago you could find them at Natures stores for a short time in June, but lately it seems really difficult to get them except for dried ones.

Comment by Joan Denoo on February 15, 2016 at 4:08pm

I am still a month away from seeding. I don't till my soil because I have growing beds in Spokane and will have them in Newport. I also mulch very heavily, and I use well-composted manure, horse, beef and chicken, with straw. I never walk on the growing beds. The beds are no wider than four feet so that I can reach all plants. The beds can be any length. 

To seed the beds, I either do block seeding, which is to dedicate one area to a plant, say beets or carrots, scatter the seeds on the bare ground, randomly. I cover with a light layer of soil or compost. When seeds begin to grow, I give them more compost. 

For seeds that I start in the greenhouse, I sow into seeding trays and when the sprouts get big enough and when all threat of frost is over, I transplant into the beds, usually in rows. A layer of mulch goes down. 

With brassicas (cabbage, Brussel sprouts, cauliflower, broccoli, kohlrabi, collard greens) I put down a layer of compost, then a light layer of straw and toss seeds into beds. At harvest time, I use a pitchfork to loosen the soil around each plant and lightly pull. The loosened soil doesn't harm those wonderful worms. Worms do the work for you, bringing nutrients from deep in the ground, to the top. Also, the frost heaves will do some loosening. 

At harvest time, I use a pitchfork to loosen the soil around each plant and lightly pull. The loosened soil doesn't harm those wonderful worms. Worms do the work for you, bringing nutrients from deep in the ground, to the top. Also, the frost heaves will do some loosening. 

 

You can find lots lots of information for no-till gardening by Googling, "Permaculture".

HOW TO BUILD A PERMACULTURE VEGETABLE GARDEN 

The video demonstrates a more complicated process than I do in Spokane. However, it gives you the basics. I have been building soil for 40+ years. It is just perfect., I am starting from scratch at Newport and will follow this process for most of the new beds. 

Comment by Randall Smith on February 15, 2016 at 7:49am

No, it means different plant types in any one area (e xcept asp./str). Corn takes up the largest area, so that's the most difficult to rotate.

While I'm thinking about it, what's your (anybody) thought on plowing up garden soil? How deep should one go? My rototiller can go down about 4-5". I'd like to go deeper, but I'm afraid I'll bring up too much clay. It's taken me 35 years to develop a topsoil (on ground that was once a barn foundation). I'd hate to bury my topsoil, yet I'd like to turn over and loosen the top 8". It's rather compacted.

Comment by Randall Smith on February 12, 2016 at 7:20am

Well, I sketched out my garden plot plans for the upcoming year last night. I rotate everything on a 4-5 year cycle, except for asparagus and strawberries. The latter needs to be moved after this sixth year. Anyway, the garden will be in standard rows, unlike last year which was too much of a hassle. As usual, the whole plan will evolve as I go. But it's a start. Hurry up, Spring!

Comment by Randall Smith on February 7, 2016 at 7:34am

Checked under my ground cover to see if "stored" parsnips were still there. Yes. I'm running low on them in my basement bucket. The garden looks pretty forlorn, all bare with no green. Won't be long! Time to start planning my pattern. I've desprouted all my potatoes. I'll have plenty leftover to plant, although I'd like to try purple ones this year. They're supposed to be healthier.

Comment by Plinius on January 22, 2016 at 3:46am
Comment by Randall Smith on January 19, 2016 at 8:07am

Daniel, you make me tired just reading about your projects! The only thing I'm doing in the garden nowadays is tossing urine around!

Comment by Joan Denoo on January 18, 2016 at 12:40am

Daniel, that is an amazing job you and Charlie completed! Your regalia adds to the charm. Hope you renew, refresh, and rest. You must feel quite proud of your projects completed. Your new kitchen is a cook's dream.  

Comment by Joan Denoo on January 18, 2016 at 12:34am

An ambitious project by Javan K. Bernakevitch of All Points Land Design and Permaculture BC, and Gord Hiebert of Element Eco-Design. They led a two and half day workshop/installation at Darfield Earthship Project. 

 

Members (181)

 
 
 

© 2018   Atheist Nexus. All rights reserved. Admin: Richard Haynes.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service