Godless in the garden

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Godless in the garden

Welcome to gardeners, growers of veggies, fruits, flowers, and trees!  

 

Welcome  backyard hen enthusiasts, worm farmers, beekeepers & composters!

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 179
Latest Activity: 7 hours ago

Welcome to Eden!

If you like to dig in the dirt, plant & prune, grow food & flowers, or sit and watch as someone else does your landscaping, you'll find something here to discuss!

Selected topics, in sort of alphabetical order:
Aging.  Gardening with an older body.
bees.  insectary.  insectsbee gardening. Beneficial insects.  insects drive evolution

Compost.  herecontaminated compost.

Backyard Chickens here. here. here. here.

Edible yard.  here  urban farmfront yards.
Growing Fruits

Folklore.

Fragrance and Scenthere.
Fruit growing.  in a small space, by backyard orchard culture.
Frugal gardening.  labels.

Gardening for future generations.  also permaculture, trees, historic varieties, soil

Hegelkultur here, here, here

Heritage and historic varieties.   heresources

locally grown plants to prevent blight transmission here.

Moon Phase Widget here. Moon phase topic here.

PeppersHot peppers.

Permaculture MollisonFalk  Liu, Joan's IntroTransformation in 90 days, Perm Principles at work. Food forest, Holzer

Potatoes.  here.

Rooftop gardening.  here

Seed starting. starting spring crops.

Scientific Gardening.   The Informed Gardener.  The truth about garden remedies.

Soil and soil building - healthy soil microbes, mycelium, dirt is everything, soil analysissoil pH.
Squirrels.

Synergies.

Tomatoes.  Myths and truths

Trees.  Tree tunnels.  Ancient tree planting. Plant commemorative trees

Discussion Forum

My Farm Failures - Revealed Justin Rhodes

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Joan Denoo Aug 15. 2 Replies

An Herb Garden for Chickens

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Daniel W Aug 1. 1 Reply

Permaculture Chickens Justin Rhodes

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Joan Denoo Jul 30. 1 Reply

Using Chickens in a Food Forest

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by k.h. ky Jul 17. 15 Replies

Crisis garden annuals

Started by Larry Martin. Last reply by Larry Martin Jul 11. 4 Replies

Comment Wall

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Comment by Idaho Spud on July 5, 2016 at 9:54am

Kathy, that's great news about your living soil.

Comment by Idaho Spud on July 5, 2016 at 9:51am

Daniel's corn makes me hungry.  I'll plant some next year.

Comment by Idaho Spud on July 5, 2016 at 9:49am

That slug looks pretty lively to me.  And very cute.  Another one I saved.

Comment by Randall Smith on July 5, 2016 at 6:55am

Great photos, Daniel. I'll check out your blogspot info when I'm done here.

This has been the wettest summer I've seen in a long time. I hand  weeded for several hours yesterday, finding it difficult to shake off the soil from the roots. Weeds have crowded out my chard. But, the garden is cleaner than in previous years. Beats sitting around like your slug, Joan! (And I'm sure you're not one.)

Comment by Joan Denoo on July 5, 2016 at 12:15am

Oh! but those pampered ears of corn will taste so good. 

Comment by Daniel W on July 4, 2016 at 7:27pm

Joan, thanks for the photo complements.  I enjoy sharing them. 

I have not tried mothballs for moles.  My neighbor sits in his lawnchair with a 22 and shoots them when they work their way up.

The corn has new ears with silks.  According to the gardening websites, it takes about 3 weeks after silks appear to have sweet corn ready to eat.  I shake each tassel to release the pollen and help fill out the ears.  There never was a more pampered corn plant.

Comment by Joan Denoo on July 4, 2016 at 7:04pm

Daniel, do mothballs work for you. Laura had dozens all around their mowed area and I just threw a few mothballs in each one, covered the hole with their excavated soil and the moles disappeared. 

Comment by Daniel W on July 4, 2016 at 6:57pm

Kathy, I have a like/dislike relationship with moles.  They do a great job with breaking up hard soil.  I had garden beds that started out as hard sod.  I covered with black plastic last winter, to kill the grass.  In early spring when I removed the plastic, the moles had pulverized the soil into a fine bed.  Digging was very easy.  On the other hand, they seem to love any new fruit trees that I plant, making their tunnels and mole hills among the roots.  Then voles come in and eat all of the roots, killing the trees.  I line the bottom of my raised beds with chicken wire, to keep moles from tunneling into the beds.

Comment by Joan Denoo on July 4, 2016 at 6:54pm

Oh! Kathy, your news just makes my day! I love to learn of your progress with the hugelkultur, and getting it to grow things. I surely want to know how your volunteers turn out. 

Daniel, your garden produces such lovely things. You even have a house hummingbird! Now, how smart does one have to be to get that treat? You inspire me!

Has your corn developed ears? We have such cold days, only a few hot days. It is great to work in the cool air, but not so good for corn. 

Daniel, do you use your cell phone to type your messages? You have another skill I don't have. 

I'm a pure slug and enjoying every bit of it. I don't even feel guilty. 

Happy 4th dear friends. 

Comment by k.h. ky on July 4, 2016 at 6:05pm
My yard that has been covered and lying fallow has done wonderful things. Less than two years later and moles are breaking the red clay up to actual soil. Worms are working beneath the cover of dead leaves, straw and occasional compost that I've thrown on top of it. It's amazing what nature can do if given the chance. The spot has gone from a clay run off of water to a living thing.
 

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