Godless in the garden

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Godless in the garden

Welcome to gardeners, growers of veggies, fruits, flowers, and trees!  

 

Welcome  backyard hen enthusiasts, worm farmers, beekeepers & composters!

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 175
Latest Activity: yesterday

Welcome to Eden!

If you like to dig in the dirt, plant & prune, grow food & flowers, or sit and watch as someone else does your landscaping, you'll find something here to discuss!

Selected topics, in sort of alphabetical order:
Aging.  Gardening with an older body.
bees.  insectary.  insectsbee gardening. Beneficial insects.  insects drive evolution

Compost.  herecontaminated compost.

Backyard Chickens here. here. here. here.

Edible yard.  here  urban farmfront yards.
Growing Fruits

Folklore.

Fragrance and Scenthere.
Fruit growing.  in a small space, by backyard orchard culture.
Frugal gardening.  labels.

Gardening for future generations.  also permaculture, trees, historic varieties, soil

Hegelkultur here, here, here

Heritage and historic varieties.   heresources

locally grown plants to prevent blight transmission here.

Moon Phase Widget here. Moon phase topic here.

PeppersHot peppers.

Permaculture MollisonFalk  Liu, Joan's IntroTransformation in 90 days, Perm Principles at work. Food forest, Holzer

Potatoes.  here.

Rooftop gardening.  here

Seed starting. starting spring crops.

Scientific Gardening.   The Informed Gardener.  The truth about garden remedies.

Soil and soil building - healthy soil microbes, mycelium, dirt is everything, soil analysissoil pH.
Squirrels.

Synergies.

Tomatoes.  Myths and truths

Trees.  Tree tunnels.  Ancient tree planting. Plant commemorative trees

Discussion Forum

Feeling like a fish back in water.

Started by amer chohan. Last reply by Daniel W yesterday. 5 Replies

The Hen in Winter

Started by Daniel W. Last reply by k.h. ky Aug 18. 11 Replies

Soil: regenerative land management

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Joan Denoo Aug 10. 11 Replies

Compact Bed Geometry

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner Jul 29. 0 Replies

Permaculture

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Joan Denoo Jul 21. 3 Replies

Mullein

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Plinius Jul 18. 1 Reply

To cure your garlic

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Randall Smith Jul 16. 1 Reply

Harvesting vegetables

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Idaho Spud Jul 9. 4 Replies

Sentient Biped's Garden Blog. Happy to add a different feed if there are suggestions.

Comment Wall

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Comment by Barbara Livingston on May 31, 2015 at 1:30pm

Daniel, I think my main problem is I planted too many squash seeds and once they started growing I was loathe to pull any out.  :) Then I thought tall tomato cages would work to support them. Both errors in judgement. I can see how although I'm getting the small pickling cucumbers I would probably get more given how many vines I have, if they all had equal access to sun - then the rain, cloudy days, and need I mention ants,  etc. Well.  I decided to simply trim everything back and see what continues to grow. (Oh yes, discovered I really should have worn gloves while doing it.)  So I now have severely trimmed back vines growing in main beds, and really long - 10' vines growing along ground at front of perennial beds. Will see which setting they prefer.

Next year I'm going to try sweet corn, it stays where it is planted.

I too planted marigolds from seed - I have never seen marigolds as tall as mine are, about 18" so far - just now begining to put out blossoms. 

Joan, living in a subdivision with privacy fence has its own rules - i.e. don't plant large things, shrubs, etc. closer than 3' to fence, don't hang things from fence, and for heavens sake don't grow anything on the fence. :)  Everything I have planted is a perennial that I can trim back to ground level and will still survive in the event work has to be done on fence.  I have one antique rose bush that the previous owner planted - I keep it trimmed so it doesn't touch the fence. 

Everytime I hear the rumble of thunder, see the flash of lightening and then hear the downpour of rain ... I think "nitrogen for my plants" - and yep, large leafy radish tops!  :) 

Comment by Daniel W on May 31, 2015 at 12:35pm
on the 6000# of veghies... Since that is LA they may have much more growing season than other places. but still 6000#!

I over-planted squash and pumpkin seeds this year. I needed an additional garden bed. Fortunately I had a good size area south of the house, mostly full sun, where I had killed the grass via black plastic. Over the oast month, that got the corn and much of the squash. If they do well, there will be zucchinis, yellow summer squash, pumpkins, butternuts, and other winter squash. I might aim for one last planting of sweet corn but it will need another cleared area and I dont want to overwhelm myself,

Sweet corn here is a challenge. Cool soil, cool nights, short summer. Corn likes warm soil, warm nights, long summer. I planted seeds for short season types.

Tomstoes are growing like crazy. I tske pride growing them from seeds each year, my tradition. Even though it's really very easy to do.

I replaced the peopers that were failing to thrive due to birds, rabbits, slugs, coolness.

Marigolds starting to bloom. Ditto for nasturtiums. Love growing those from seed. Some four o'clocks are coming up from last year's roots. Vigorous! Plus new seedlings.

Happy gardening everyone. I love reading about your experiences!
Comment by Joan Denoo on May 31, 2015 at 11:23am

Ian, thanks for the video! I shared it with my family team. 

Comment by Joan Denoo on May 31, 2015 at 11:05am

Barbara, I love your comments, so full of information and an inspiration for me. 

Yes, I hope the swales will hold moisture in the ground. Michelle took photos and with her five kids, an active member of the Fir District, and a very good gardener, she may delay posting the photos. I will post them here as soon as she sends them to me.

It is amazing to learn of all your water. Living at Ft. Hood and trying to garden was a real challenge because of lack of water. I wonder if that area will become more tropical? My patch of Earth in Spokane is trending toward USDA Zone 6 from zone 5. I continue to select plants for Zone 5 because of the freak cold spells that surprise us all who garden there.

I wonder if using your fence for support of your vining vegetables will provide space in your hugelkultur bed? The disadvantage is the plants may not have full sun. If you put some kind of netting or wire support on the fence the vining plants could grow to 10 feet. This design would require managing the vines because the fence is probably only six feet high. 

The video of 6,000 lbs. of food on a small city lot amazed me, too. It is an extreme design and doable. I saved the video to get some ideas. I don't want to garden in that extreme way, however, I do not like grass. I have not one blade of grass in my Spokane garden. The garden at Newport can be huge. We cleared a space for a new greenhouse, and there are about a dozen raised bed boxes that I plan to use after we put up deer fencing. 

The vigorous growth of greens with little development of radishes may indicate too much nitrogen. 

"Overcrowded plants produce small, misshapen roots. Hot, pithy radishes may be the result of hot weather or harvesting too late. Excessive nitrogen, the rapid onset of hot weather, or overcrowding may produce plants that are all tops (lush foliage, little or no root development)."

Growing Radishes in the Home Garden

Oh! Yes! powdery mildew and damp weather. I know it well! This video describes the process of prevention and treatment. Please forgive the LDS comment. This is the best video I quickly found. 
Powdery Mildew Treatment: How To Kill Powdery Mildew Fast

I agree! "Gardeners are the most optimistic people on earth! "

hugelkultur bed

Comment by Barbara Livingston on May 31, 2015 at 9:52am

Randall, with all the standing water and soggy ground in my small space and all the mosquito potential I can't begin to imagine what the farmers must be going through.

Joan, with your water drainage, swales are perfect to slow the water down. I hope you are able to take pictures of your efforts as I would like to see them. 

Don, you said it was okay to cut the vines - article Spud suggested said each plant needed 10 feet to support actual fruit. I was standing in garden with scissors prepared to start cutting and realized they still hadn't reached 10' although they have grown outside my actual garden area - ditto with everything I planted in my small hugelkultur bed. With all the rain we've had I envision them growing across the lawn, up the privacy fence and over into my neighbor's yard!

I realize I simply don't have the room to grow vining veggies, squash, melons, cucumbers unless I put in heavy metal upright supports such as cattle grating.  I put in a wooden trellis, and several large tomato cages for the cucumbers and with all the rain I can't even see the supports - the fvines completely cover them.  This year has definitely been a learning experience. 

Back to the drawing board.  I'm amazed that someone could produce 6,000 lbs. of food on the same amount of space that I have.  

Chris, my radish tops grew like crazy, the actual radish not so much.  The ground was actually muddy around them.  However, bunnies love the tops! :) 

Clearing weather with sunshine is forecast for this week and just in time for all my drought tolerant plants that are all gasping from too much water - a new salvia that I was excited about growing simply died after a great start. Today is treatment day for the powdery mildew rearing its ugly head. 

I can't believe I've just said anything about too much rain.  The good thing is more sunshine is on the way - and my rain barrels are full.  

AND - next week I attend a seminar on Fall Planting. 

Gardeners are the most optimistic people on earth! 

Comment by Randall Smith on May 31, 2015 at 7:31am

We also got deluged with over 2" of rain yest. My yard and garden drains well, but surrounding farm fields have standing water in every ponding area. I feel sorry for the farmers--crops ruined. We have (and I pay dearly for) extensive tile drainage networks, but they can't handle so much water is such little time. 3 days under water kills corn and beans.

Comment by Joan Denoo on May 30, 2015 at 11:10am

Looks like our work day is rained out. (See Hang with Friends, "Today is a big day of the family joining together to clear out the underbrush of the forest, ")

An extremely heavy rain burst out. The soil here is very sandy with only little patches of clay. The ground percolates water as fast as it comes down. We created flow patterns to the rain-run-off, keeping it as high on the hill and flowing for as long as possible before it leaves the property. 

Today is a big day of the family joining together to clear out the underbrush of the forest, 

Comment by Joan Denoo on May 30, 2015 at 11:01am

Daniel, that is one remarkable family and garden:

Grow 6,000 pounds of food on 1/10 of an acre per year, in Los Angeles. 

http://valhallamovement.com/link/learn-how-this-family-grows-6000-l...

Comment by Joan Denoo on May 30, 2015 at 10:41am

Chris, two radishes! I'm impressed! I planted seeds in pots, seed starter flats, and in the ground. The only thing showing is radishes and they are a long way from eating size. 

Comment by Plinius on May 30, 2015 at 9:30am

Harvest home! The first two radishes!

 

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