Godless in the garden

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Godless in the garden

Welcome to gardeners, growers of veggies, fruits, flowers, and trees, backyard hen enthusiasts, worm farmers, & composters!

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 180
Latest Activity: 6 hours ago

Welcome to Eden!

If you like to dig in the dirt, grow flowers, putter around the yard, dig in the kitchen garden, raise backyard hens, or just like daydreaming about the garden, this is the place.

Many topics have been discussed in the archive.  Revive a topic by adding your 2¢ or start a new topic.

Everyone likes photos of the garden, so if you like to share photos of your prize dahlia, your favorite hen, or your first tomato, go right ahead!

Discussion Forum

GARDEN HOSE PROBLEM

Started by Dominic Florio. Last reply by Joan Denoo 6 hours ago. 16 Replies

Permaculture thinking and skills for youth

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Joan Denoo Aug 24. 3 Replies

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Comment by Daniel W on November 11, 2014 at 10:12am

Barbara, it sounds like some great memories.  Something to be nostalgic about.

Randy, be careful out in the cold!

We expect to be into the 20s tonight.  Not as bad as some places, but winter is here, for certain.

I don't buy these cactuses any more.  Went through a phase of picking one up now and then in the grocery store, during the holiday season.  Now I have about 8.  Cheerful this time of year.  They get minimal care - sit in shade during summer and fall, bring inside when they start to bud - Oct - repot once in a while, water when I remember.

Comment by Randall Smith on November 11, 2014 at 7:48am

Today (actually, only this morning) is my last chance to work in the garden before the weather turns brutal--highs in the 30's for a week at least. I have much to clean up. Picked my last good head of cauliflower to blanch and freeze. Still have kale, collards, carrots, some cabbage heads, and rainbow chard. Oh, and arugula.

Barbara, I was surprised to hear you were raised on a farm. Lucky girl, even though you didn't appreciate it at the time. Here I assumed you were a rookie in the gardening venture. I certainly feel like an amateur compared to Daniel, Don, Joan, etc. Anyway, I enjoy reading about your progressions (adventures?)! 

Don, you're right, of course. Pruning IS important. I'm giving excuses why I don't!

Comment by Idaho Spud on November 11, 2014 at 6:36am

Went outside at 2:30 AM and snowflakes were falling on my head.

Comment by Idaho Spud on November 10, 2014 at 3:42pm

He also took us out each autumn and gleaned several hundred pounds of potatoes that the large potato farmers' machines left on the ends of the rows.

Comment by Idaho Spud on November 10, 2014 at 3:40pm

Barbara, I like the benefits you're getting from gardening.  I get similar benefits.

I wasn't a farm boy, but my dad had about a half acre, where he kept a fairly large garden, and a huge patch of alfalfa that he fed to the rabbits he raised for food.  That's probably where I got my liking for rabbit meat.

Comment by Barbara Livingston on November 10, 2014 at 1:38pm

Spud, farm girl here and I too remember whole milk as a way of life. I also remember thinking the milk I drank at school in the little cartons as a treat as it didn't taste the same as raw milk at home.

At the time I didn't understand the value of the farm that supplied our family of eight with everything we needed to eat in addition to providing a living for us.  My father supplied beef, veal, ham, eggs and chickens to local grocery store in addition to selling bulk milk and eggs. We had an orchard for fruit and extensive berry patches along with a huge garden for vegetables that were canned and frozen.

I thought of it as nothing but work as we all had our "chores", seven days a week and I was eager to leave when I did.  Now I get misty-eyed when I remember those days, 

Comment by Barbara Livingston on November 10, 2014 at 1:22pm

Joan, Permaculture really didn't sit well with me when I first saw it - simply too messy, appeared disorganized, weedy, etc. Then after about the 3rd video/article I began to realize the value. Also, Sensei Fukuoka was all about reducing the work involved in the growing process, which makes total sense to me as I imagine next year I won't be able to do as much as I can this year ... and so on. 

Randall, ..."As for growing your own potatoes vs. market, it's not the cost. It's the satisfaction and joy of self reliance--and gardening! Taste matters, too."

You are spot on with that statement. I live alone, have many food restrictions, have limited income, etc.  It would definitely be cheaper for me to simply buy my food whether at farmer's market or grocery store. I haven't even begun to have a harvest and yet I already am reaping benefits; therapy for depression, exercise I can't get in a gym, entertainment with my little dog who "helps" me, peace and relaxation of hearing birdsong and sheer delight of rain as my plants recover from days of dry heat Along with hours spent reading books and online, and having the wonderful feeling that I'm helping in some small way a piece of earth become healthier.   

Planted garlic in my smart pot today, and added compost to the veggie garden. Couldn't find organic at the grocery store, so just bought regular bulk kind, label said it was from Texas,Mexico. Not sure how it can be from both places. Only out 54 cents if it doesn't grow. 

 

Comment by Joan Denoo on November 10, 2014 at 11:39am

Barbara, I am enjoying your recommendations very much. Especially Masanobu Fukuoka. I wish I had heard of him before I pulled all those weeds that came up from my year of cancer dancing. His method makes sense, and I can make some little and big changes in my garden in response to his ideas. Permaculture is getting more fun every season. 

 

Comment by Idaho Spud on November 10, 2014 at 11:00am

I haven't been to Pocatello's Farmers' Market in about 2 years, so I'll try it again next season.

When I lived in a very small community 35 years ago, I got my milk fresh squeezed, unpasteurized and unhomogenized, from a dairy farmer just a half mile from me, and it was delicious.  We could leave any size container and he would fill it at the next milking.  It's probably against the law now.

I probably could have got most of my meat from local people there also, if I had asked around.  One acquaintance said he had just butchered one of his young calves, and ask if I wanted the liver. Oh, wow!  That fresh liver was one of the best things I've ever tasted!  Store-bought liver is like cardboard in comparison.

I've had freshly butchered rabbit as well, with similar taste satisfaction.  I just found the address of a rabbit farmer near here, and I plan on paying him a visit in the near future.

Comment by Don on November 10, 2014 at 7:38am

Here in the Northeast Kingdom, fortunate to live not far from Peaslee's Potato Farm.  The spuds are tasty, fresh, and really inexpensive because, sold locally, there are no shipping costs added on. 

 

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