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Godless in the garden

Welcome to gardeners, growers of veggies, fruits, flowers, and trees!  

 

Welcome  backyard hen enthusiasts, worm farmers, beekeepers & composters!

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 179
Latest Activity: 13 hours ago

Welcome to Eden!

If you like to dig in the dirt, plant & prune, grow food & flowers, or sit and watch as someone else does your landscaping, you'll find something here to discuss!

Selected topics, in sort of alphabetical order:
Aging.  Gardening with an older body.
bees.  insectary.  insectsbee gardening. Beneficial insects.  insects drive evolution

Compost.  herecontaminated compost.

Backyard Chickens here. here. here. here.

Edible yard.  here  urban farmfront yards.
Growing Fruits

Folklore.

Fragrance and Scenthere.
Fruit growing.  in a small space, by backyard orchard culture.
Frugal gardening.  labels.

Gardening for future generations.  also permaculture, trees, historic varieties, soil

Hegelkultur here, here, here

Heritage and historic varieties.   heresources

locally grown plants to prevent blight transmission here.

Moon Phase Widget here. Moon phase topic here.

PeppersHot peppers.

Permaculture MollisonFalk  Liu, Joan's IntroTransformation in 90 days, Perm Principles at work. Food forest, Holzer

Potatoes.  here.

Rooftop gardening.  here

Seed starting. starting spring crops.

Scientific Gardening.   The Informed Gardener.  The truth about garden remedies.

Soil and soil building - healthy soil microbes, mycelium, dirt is everything, soil analysissoil pH.
Squirrels.

Synergies.

Tomatoes.  Myths and truths

Trees.  Tree tunnels.  Ancient tree planting. Plant commemorative trees

Comment Wall

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Comment by Don on August 20, 2016 at 9:56am

No humidity and no bugs at all here in northern Vermont at the height of our all-too-brief gardening season.  Beautiful weather.  Cooking down tomatoes and shredding zukes for the freezer today, while others in the household are picking wild blackberries, which are really plentiful this year. 

Comment by Joan Denoo on August 20, 2016 at 9:32am

Kathy, your humidity sounds unbearable, and the bugs, just awful. I would invite you to move to the northwest, however, with the balmy weather we have, the entire nation will be migrating to the northwest. Just the load of people arriving by the millions will make Washington state heavy on the continent and tip us right off into the Pacific Ocean. 

Randy, the sweat bees are new to me. I Googled how to eliminate sweat bees, and the remedy does not look easy. Here is what I found. Wish I could find a better way to get rid of them. 

How to Eliminate Sweat Bees

There is a whole page of solutions, and none of them look too promising. It is the sweet sweat that lures them to you ... at least that what is claimed. 

I wonder if eating garlic helps? What do construction workers, gardeners, or road crews do? 

Comment by Randall Smith on August 20, 2016 at 8:53am

Yes, spring raspberry producing vines die out and new shoots give the autumn berries. They winter over to produce spring berries. I'm going to be making a lot of wine!

It hasn't been so much the mosquitoes, but the sweat bees that drive me crazy. They are swarming me this year. One day, as I sat in my lawn chair, I was determined to kill every last one that landed on me. I must have swatted over 200 and they still kept coming! I finally gave up. I'm not sure if they do any pollinating. I'll have to look that up.

Comment by Idaho Spud on August 20, 2016 at 6:34am

Kathy, perhaps you have the kind of raspberry that only fruit once a year.

Comment by k.h. ky on August 19, 2016 at 9:10pm
We've been hotter than usual this year. When it's not raining it's in the mid nineties. Humidity hovers between 70-95 %.
Spud, you are right about the bugs. No matter how hot it is I have to wear long pants outside. Mosquitoes are unbearable this year.
I don't know why I don't get the second crop of red raspberries. Probably to much heat and humidity.
Comment by Joan Denoo on August 19, 2016 at 4:46pm

Daniel, I look forward to learning how your kitchen garden produces. Here's a celebration of okra!

Comment by Joan Denoo on August 19, 2016 at 4:44pm

With the high temperatures over the past few years, and with lower than usual precipitation, the natural soils dry out. You may begin to see a difference in the rural landscape, Spud, or not. 

What I observe is a dryer than normal forest, even conifers look stressed. If so, the beetle will come in and kill off the weakened forest. Fires follow. 

I am going up to the L&L Paradise Acres  (my name for Laura's & Larry's home) for the weekend. I will check with the lumbermen while there and learn what their assessment is. 

Comment by Idaho Spud on August 19, 2016 at 1:49pm

The past 3 years has seen quite a few summer temperatures over 100, but not this year.

Comment by Idaho Spud on August 19, 2016 at 1:47pm

My temperatures are about average (87°).  They were warmer than average in June, often getting to 100, but not in July or August so far.

Rainfall is way below average.  June average is about 1.5 inch, but this year was 0.5  July average is 0.65, but this year was 0.1  August average is 0.59, but so far this year is 0.05

Comment by Daniel Wachenheim on August 19, 2016 at 1:38pm

Joan, I don't know if it's record.  There are usually a couple of very hot weeks in the summer here.  Nights still cool off so there is some releif.  My house does not have a/c but I have a portable a/c for a bedroom, which becomes home for me and my dog.

I don't take the heat very well any more.

I'm just hoping for some good summer kitchen garden crops.  Maybe that elusive holy grail for me, okra, will produce.

 

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