Godless in the garden

Information

Godless in the garden

Welcome to gardeners, growers of veggies, fruits, flowers, and trees!  

 

Welcome  backyard hen enthusiasts, worm farmers, beekeepers & composters!

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 179
Latest Activity: on Friday

Welcome to Eden!

If you like to dig in the dirt, plant & prune, grow food & flowers, or sit and watch as someone else does your landscaping, you'll find something here to discuss!

Selected topics, in sort of alphabetical order:
Aging.  Gardening with an older body.
bees.  insectary.  insectsbee gardening. Beneficial insects.  insects drive evolution

Compost.  herecontaminated compost.

Backyard Chickens here. here. here. here.

Edible yard.  here  urban farmfront yards.
Growing Fruits

Folklore.

Fragrance and Scenthere.
Fruit growing.  in a small space, by backyard orchard culture.
Frugal gardening.  labels.

Gardening for future generations.  also permaculture, trees, historic varieties, soil

Hegelkultur here, here, here

Heritage and historic varieties.   heresources

locally grown plants to prevent blight transmission here.

Moon Phase Widget here. Moon phase topic here.

PeppersHot peppers.

Permaculture MollisonFalk  Liu, Joan's IntroTransformation in 90 days, Perm Principles at work. Food forest, Holzer

Potatoes.  here.

Rooftop gardening.  here

Seed starting. starting spring crops.

Scientific Gardening.   The Informed Gardener.  The truth about garden remedies.

Soil and soil building - healthy soil microbes, mycelium, dirt is everything, soil analysissoil pH.
Squirrels.

Synergies.

Tomatoes.  Myths and truths

Trees.  Tree tunnels.  Ancient tree planting. Plant commemorative trees

Discussion Forum

My Farm Failures - Revealed Justin Rhodes

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Joan Denoo Aug 15. 2 Replies

An Herb Garden for Chickens

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Daniel W Aug 1. 1 Reply

Permaculture Chickens Justin Rhodes

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Joan Denoo Jul 30. 1 Reply

Using Chickens in a Food Forest

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by k.h. ky Jul 17. 15 Replies

Crisis garden annuals

Started by Larry Martin. Last reply by Larry Martin Jul 11. 4 Replies

Comment Wall

Comment

You need to be a member of Godless in the garden to add comments!

Comment by Randall Smith on April 23, 2016 at 7:18am

Daniel, why haven't I thought of that long ago?! I "root" cuttings all the time, but never tomatoes. In fact, I have two varieties of grape cuttings sitting in water logged sand/soil mix. I'm crossing my fingers they'll take.

Comment by Daniel W on April 22, 2016 at 12:47pm

For anyone who gives in to the temptation to buy tomato plants this early - kind of a risk because they may not thrive until weather is warmer.  But there they are in the store, tempting, tempting.  One way to hedge bets and increase the number of plants at no cost at all, is to cut off any branches that have formed and root them in water.  Lower branches are not wanted on tomato plants, anyway.

Tomatoes root very very easily in water.  This is a cutting I started from plants that I grew for rootstock, but any type is much easier.

All that I did was place the cuttings into a coffee cup in water, and sit in a window sill.  This is about one week.  Now I am potting them up in some seedling medium to use as rootstocks in a few days or a week.

Once they are established in seedling medium, they will be moved into regular potting soil to grow a little more, then into the vegetable garden.

Comment by Daniel W on April 21, 2016 at 7:42am
Joan there is some depression but I am trying to focus on the positive and things that I can do do thing about. I took all of my work clothes to Goodwill. I've pretty much emptied a bookcase and working on another, taking books to library for their book sale. I've emptied my home office of all of the papers, lots of shredding. Moving on...

In the yard and garden, Spring is so busy, or Ive made it so, it's difficult to keep up with myself! I was thinking about your move, and hope you were able to take some Iris or lilac starts to pass on. If not, I imagine others will treasure what you leave in Spokane.

Randy, I envy you for your apricots! Stone fruits are a big challenge here. I gave up on apricots. Peaches take effort but there are promises of a good crop this year. Cherries also look promising. Asian pears... there should be a few bowls of them, which is fine.

BB, the 80s weather got some flowers, but others are looking good. It was / is a good Spring for lilacs.

Next up - get tomato plants into the ground. They will need protection. Start cucurbits, squashes, pumpkin, melons seeds.

Lots of promise this year!
Comment by Randall Smith on April 21, 2016 at 7:09am
Except for a few things, my garden is pretty well planted. And it's raining today, a welcome site. Our average last frost date is April 30, so I have covers ready for tomatoes, just in case.
Beautiful photos of your iris, Daniel!
My apricot trees were the first fruits to blossom, and I now have small apricots! I've sprayed and will spray some more. Apples and pears are just now blooming. Persimmons come later. Best time of the year!
Comment by Joan Denoo on April 21, 2016 at 12:25am

Daniel, I read your March 5, 2016, post, written the day after your last day at work. I am sorry I had not read it earlier. Learning of the surprise potluck party and the greetings people gave you brought tears to my eyes. 

Such a dramatic change, from the pace and intensity, demands and requirements of a busy profession, to a life of retirement, with no schedules, no deadlines, no administration putting pressure on you, no patients needing more than money allowes, raises feelings of depression for so many people sharing your experiences.  

It seems you have settled into a new normal. I notice you chat more, and share your many activities more, and seem to have a wider frame of reference than when you were working toward retirement. 

I read a lighter step, a cheerier demeanor, and a funny bone reveals that part of you more often. You sound happy! 

Comment by Joan Denoo on April 20, 2016 at 11:08pm

My life has been boxes this spring. Packing, unpacking, finding places to put my things in already overabundantly furnished homes. Laura inherited her Dad’s things, my mother's things, and her paternal grandparent's things. She doled furnishings out to each of the girls and when I walk in a room here or at Michelle’s or Laurie’s I recognize the belongings of the now deceased generations. When I walk in their gardens, I see plants that were passed down to me and now to my daughter, granddaughters, and their children. I am most content. The great-grandkids and their families, dogs, cats, the greenhouse, and chickens fill my days. I go to bed exhausted and wake up refreshed and eager to share the day with this menagerie.
Daniel, your raised bed of concrete blocks and capped with cobblestone pavers creates a nice warm bed early in the season. I agree, raised beds such as these do make a big difference in my gardening. I don’t get so tired tending the beds, soils warm up and dry out earlier than garden soils, and beds designed to protect from frosts, insects, deer, or rabbits work well. I like your experiment of testing temperatures of soil in the garden, the ground in wooden raised beds, and soil in concrete blocks and cobblestones raised beds. It gives the substantial information needed to evaluate options in planting styles.

Comment by Bertold Brautigan on April 20, 2016 at 9:31pm

Beautiful, Daniel. Blooms seem to be more robust and lasting longer than usual this year.

Comment by Daniel W on April 20, 2016 at 9:25pm

Here are some of the potatoes and onions now.   We've had temps into the 80s - way to early for that in maritime Pacific NW.  There can be frosts into May.  I measured soil temp at 60 in am and 80 in pm, so planted some Indian and Sweet corn.  If it frosts, it's a goner and I need to replant.  Indian corn planted last week is sprouting.

Figs are looking very good this year.  I am trying not to get too excited,  but I LOVE fresh figs.

Looks like a bad year for plums.  They bloomed early, and either frosted or was too cold to set.  Only a couple of handfuls are developing.  Pawpaws are blooming, and I've been pollinizing them using a paintbrush to transfer pollen from one tree to the other and back.  Next up - persimmons look like they will be blooming soon.  I can hope!

Comment by Daniel W on April 20, 2016 at 8:57pm

Some of the irises blooming in my yard.  Most are historic varieties.  I like those because they have survived the ages, through family members taking them when they move, or grandmother giving them to grandchild, or in cemeteries, or ramshackle homestead.  The historic ones are not as flashy, colors are more muted, smaller flowers and less ruffling, compared to modern ones.  I don't care - they remind me of visiting my grandma, or great aunt, or grandfather.

Her Majesty - sweet "iris" candy fragrance Alcazar Indian Chief - wow, the fragrance, makes me think I'm back in my great aunt's back yard 50 years ago A modern one called "Autumn circus"

This looks like the best year since I started the flower beds.  I almost gave up last year, they were dying off.  I'm glad I kept them after all.

Comment by Daniel W on April 19, 2016 at 2:13pm

Randy I think the CCC might have built character.  A modern equivalent, but this time emplying women and men, seems like a good idea.  There are so many people out of work.

That catalpa hurts!  Those are beautiful trees.  Oh well!

I think you have less late frost than I do.  Recommendations here are for planting a lot of things in May and even June.  WIth the unseasonable warm weather, I'm planting more now.  Potatoes are already growing nicely.  I planted flint corn last weekend, and aim to plant more this weekend - fun and chicken food.

Glad you are in the garden!  It is the best place to be.

 

Members (178)

 
 
 

line

Update Your Membership :

Membership

line

line

Nexus on Social Media:

line

© 2016   Atheist Nexus. All rights reserved. Admin: Richard Haynes.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service