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Godless in the garden

Welcome to gardeners, growers of veggies, fruits, flowers, and trees!  

 

Welcome  backyard hen enthusiasts, worm farmers, beekeepers & composters!

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 179
Latest Activity: 17 hours ago

Welcome to Eden!

If you like to dig in the dirt, plant & prune, grow food & flowers, or sit and watch as someone else does your landscaping, you'll find something here to discuss!

Selected topics, in sort of alphabetical order:
Aging.  Gardening with an older body.
bees.  insectary.  insectsbee gardening. Beneficial insects.  insects drive evolution

Compost.  herecontaminated compost.

Backyard Chickens here. here. here. here.

Edible yard.  here  urban farmfront yards.
Growing Fruits

Folklore.

Fragrance and Scenthere.
Fruit growing.  in a small space, by backyard orchard culture.
Frugal gardening.  labels.

Gardening for future generations.  also permaculture, trees, historic varieties, soil

Hegelkultur here, here, here

Heritage and historic varieties.   heresources

locally grown plants to prevent blight transmission here.

Moon Phase Widget here. Moon phase topic here.

PeppersHot peppers.

Permaculture MollisonFalk  Liu, Joan's IntroTransformation in 90 days, Perm Principles at work. Food forest, Holzer

Potatoes.  here.

Rooftop gardening.  here

Seed starting. starting spring crops.

Scientific Gardening.   The Informed Gardener.  The truth about garden remedies.

Soil and soil building - healthy soil microbes, mycelium, dirt is everything, soil analysissoil pH.
Squirrels.

Synergies.

Tomatoes.  Myths and truths

Trees.  Tree tunnels.  Ancient tree planting. Plant commemorative trees

Sentient Biped's Garden Blog. Happy to add a different feed if there are suggestions.

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Comment by Daniel Wachenheim on July 16, 2016 at 10:43am

Randy, I imagine you get great sweet corn in Indiana.  Perfect climate conditions and soil.  Corn loves hot humid summers.

I didn't grow corn for many years.  It was described as not likely to be successful here, because of our shorter cooler summers, especially cool spring and cool nights.

Last year I researced the varieties and chose two that have shorter season, and supposedly tolerate cooler soil.  The plant is shorter and the ears are smaller.  All I can say is one variety, "Trinity" was SO good, the best sweet corn I've had in many years.  The ears are not huge, but they are respectable.  The other was Early Sunglow, which was just too puny, not productive in my garden.

This year I planted sweet orn every 2 or 3 weeks late April to end of June.  I planted 4 varieties - Trinity, Bilicious, White Mirai, and Bodaceous.    The first of the trinity is 2 weeks after developing silks, so expecting sweet corn soon.  It takes some research because some seed packets are not labeled as to their genetics.

There are several corn genes for sweetness.  None are GMO for the home gardener, just conventional breeding.  

Sugary (su), Sugary Enhanced (se), “Supersweet” (sh2)

If you mix varieties, it can mess up the sweetness.  Most seem to be se, like the Trinity that I grew.  The sweetness genes are mutations in the process that converts sugar to starch, so there is more sugar, less starch, and they keep longer depending on the variety.  So you don't have to run from the corn patch to the pot of boiling water to get them perfect, any more. 

Most of mine this year are se types, but Mirai is a combo of all 3 genes.  Some gardeners complain it is too sweet, too tender, and doesn't taste like corn.  I hope to find out in about a month.  The catalog states Mirai can be eaten fresh off the plant without cooking.  I don't know about that.

Comment by Randall Smith on July 16, 2016 at 7:24am
My yard and garden is surrounded by fields of either corn or soybeans. When it's corn, I have to plant my sweet corn as far from the field as possible. Usually and fortunately however, sweet corn pollinates before field corn. Enjoyed your explanation, Daniel.
Nice looking garden, Don!
Comment by k.h. ky on July 15, 2016 at 8:58pm
Thanks Daniel. You are far from pedantic. Informative is the word I would use. And entertaining. Loved the example of cross breeding :) It was the rotation I had in my mind. Such as it's became anyway. Age is catching up with me.
Comment by Daniel Wachenheim on July 15, 2016 at 8:47pm
The effects of cross breeding are seen in the plants grown from the seeds that follow. So, if you grow brussels sproiuts next to cabbages, the generation you are growing are not affected. However if those plants bloom at the same time, and you collect the seeds, then grow plants from the seeds, those plants might be hybrid between brussels sprouts and cabbages.

It's like if a white persom lives next door to a Chinese person, they wont start to look like each other. But if they get carried away over too much wine and flowers, their children might look like both parents, but not exactly like either.

The exception is corn. That is because the genetics shows up in the corn seed. So, if you grow white sweet corn next to yellow field corn, and the wind blows pollen from the field corn to the sweet corn, then some of the kernels on the white sweet corn plant will be yellow and starchy instead of white and sweet.

What can happen is if there is a disease of cabbages or insect pest of cabbages, that can affect the brussels sprouts and vice versa.

OK, enough of my being pedantic.
Comment by k.h. ky on July 15, 2016 at 8:38pm
Don, it's Kathy if you like. And that is a beautiful garden.
Comment by Don on July 15, 2016 at 7:58pm

k.h., that may be so--I have never worried about cross breeding, although for the past couple of years I have had a disappointing B. sprouts crop.  Few sprouts and too small.  Maybe that's the reason.  Here is the garden two years ago, with the sprouts close to the cabbages.  The gardeners I have consulted have not suggested as a possibly cause, but who knows?

Comment by k.h. ky on July 15, 2016 at 7:43pm
Daniel, have you tried DE a on top the soil beneath the cabbage plants? The crushed shells in the DE are supposed to kill the slugs.
Comment by k.h. ky on July 15, 2016 at 7:40pm
Don't, your garden reminds me of the ones my parents grew. Always weed free and thriving.
Question; I've always read that cabbage and Brussels sprouts shouldn't be planted close together because of cross breeding. Did I just remember it wrong?
Comment by Don on July 15, 2016 at 1:32pm

Thanks, Joan!  I love their innocent vigor and symmetry.  My green beans are looking really good right now, too.

Comment by Idaho Spud on July 15, 2016 at 1:10pm

I agree Joan.  I've always thought that nature looks more beautiful than the finest painting, sculpture, or any man-made object.

 

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