Godless in the garden

Welcome to gardeners, growers of veggies, fruits, flowers, and trees!  


Welcome  backyard hen enthusiasts, worm farmers, beekeepers & composters!

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 179
Latest Activity: on Monday

Welcome to Eden!

If you like to dig in the dirt, plant & prune, grow food & flowers, or sit and watch as someone else does your landscaping, you'll find something here to discuss!

Selected topics, in sort of alphabetical order:
Aging.  Gardening with an older body.
bees.  insectary.  insectsbee gardening. Beneficial insects.  insects drive evolution

Compost.  herecontaminated compost.

Backyard Chickens here. here. here. here.

Edible yard.  here  urban farmfront yards.
Growing Fruits


Fragrance and Scenthere.
Fruit growing.  in a small space, by backyard orchard culture.
Frugal gardening.  labels.

Gardening for future generations.  also permaculture, trees, historic varieties, soil

Hegelkultur here, here, here

Heritage and historic varieties.   heresources

locally grown plants to prevent blight transmission here.

Moon Phase Widget here. Moon phase topic here.

PeppersHot peppers.

Permaculture MollisonFalk  Liu, Joan's IntroTransformation in 90 days, Perm Principles at work. Food forest, Holzer

Potatoes.  here.

Rooftop gardening.  here

Seed starting. starting spring crops.

Scientific Gardening.   The Informed Gardener.  The truth about garden remedies.

Soil and soil building - healthy soil microbes, mycelium, dirt is everything, soil analysissoil pH.


Tomatoes.  Myths and truths

Trees.  Tree tunnels.  Ancient tree planting. Plant commemorative trees

Discussion Forum

The Broadfork Chicken MIRACLE

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Idaho Spud Oct 8. 4 Replies

What Killed My Chicken - How To Know

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Daniel Wachenheim Sep 28. 2 Replies

Polluting Yourself with Leaf Blowers

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by Daniel Wachenheim Sep 22. 6 Replies

Willow tree

Started by Thomas Murray. Last reply by Ruth Anthony-Gardner Sep 15. 12 Replies

Front yard gardening. Edible Estates.

Started by Daniel Wachenheim. Last reply by k.h. ky Sep 15. 14 Replies

Archer Strawberry

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by Idaho Spud Sep 15. 2 Replies

Deer Fence Installed! But Where's the Mulch?

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Randall Smith Sep 6. 1 Reply

My Farm Failures - Revealed Justin Rhodes

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Joan Denoo Aug 15. 2 Replies

Comment Wall


You need to be a member of Godless in the garden to add comments!

Comment by Daniel Wachenheim on January 10, 2016 at 8:56pm

Joan, I thought you might be curious about this open-pollinated, north and cold tolerant, short season, early ripening flint corn.  Painted mountain corn.

According to the website, this corn was a do-it-yourself progect lasting 30 years.   Developed from multiple varieties of Native American flint corn.   Not a commercial hybrid, not GMO, not inbred.

I am going to try just for fun.  If it grows and develops, the plan is to use for chicken feed and/or cornmeal and/or decoration.

The other one I want to try, more for corn flour, is Dakota Ivory.   Seeds from the Northern part of Maine.  I have plans for learning  how to cook Tamales, after I am freed from the shackles of corporate life.

It will take some planning to keep these and the sweet corn separated so they don't pollinize each other, but I think I can do it. 

Comment by Daniel Wachenheim on January 5, 2016 at 12:59pm

Update on the palm from 2,000 year old seed.   The first Judean palm, grown in 2,000 years, came from a seed found in a Jar on the Masada archeological site.  The seeds were kept dry by the climate, too dry to make them moldy or degrade.  A researcher attempted to sprout a few seeds and one grew.  That tree was named "Methuselah".

I was wondering what happened.  According to this article. the palm is male, has been used to pollenize a related species of palm - so those seeds would be 1/2 Judean palm.  I though if someone lived long enough, they could grow the hybrids to  bearing age and if fertile, back cross to Methuselah to create 75% Judean palm, then repeat for 87.5%.

It turns out, she has some newer plants from ancient seeds, that are female.  So within a lifetime, maybe have pure Judean palm dates.  very cool..

Comment by Randall Smith on January 5, 2016 at 7:25am

It's January, but I'm still harvesting produce from my garden. From on top, I have Brussels sprouts and collards and arugella. If I remove a ground cover, I have carrots and parsnips. It's all about to end however. Gonna get really cold next week.

Comment by Joan Denoo on January 3, 2016 at 1:21am

Oh! Yes! Chris, they exist and most parents and teachers do all they can to squish the life out of them.

Comment by Plinius on January 2, 2016 at 11:48pm

I'd love such a child, but I've never known if they were for real. 

Comment by Joan Denoo on January 2, 2016 at 3:30pm

Daniel, she represents the kind of student I enjoyed in my classroom. The troubled and troubling kids landed in my care and we both grew. 

Comment by Daniel Wachenheim on January 2, 2016 at 12:57pm

Here's an adorable little atheist gardener who doesn't let bullying priests and concerned mom stop her.

via friendlyatheist on patheos.
Comment by Daniel Wachenheim on January 2, 2016 at 10:16am

Randy, I am very much looking forward to Spring.  There are more projects planned than I can say.  Plus I really want to see the fruit trees bloom and start to produce, and the vegetable garden get started.

Image is from landscape planting at work.  Even winter has it's beautiful scenes.

Comment by Randall Smith on January 2, 2016 at 7:39am

I concur with the two of you that living in "the country" is much more satisfying that urban dwelling. You both sound happy and content, despite going through the ordeals of cancer. Working outdoors in our gardens gives us all something to look forward to. Can't wait for Spring! In fact, I had to laugh out loud when my 6 yr old grandson asked me yesterday, "when does Spring come?"!

Comment by Daniel Wachenheim on January 1, 2016 at 7:53pm
What a beautiful setting! Your knowledge of the geology only makes it more beautiful.

There are lots of places on Craigslist that have used plastic food-grade barrels here. I guess the local Frito-Lay factory, among other places, gets a lot of materials in one-use durable plastic barrels that need disposal once they are used. They need alteration and fittings, but in the end we wind up with a passive, no use of power or pumps that need repairs, no expensive filters, gravity-fed, gravity-draining, good quality water for gardening. Some users have a method to flush the first roof runoff from a rain, but I dont think I need that for nonpotable watering.

I wonder if redwoods or sequoia woukd survive there. I love pine wood. Dont care much for fir, splinters too easily. is the cedar fragrant like midwest cedar? Those were really a type of Juniper, beautifil red wood with wonderful fragrance.

Today cleared more brambles. Not hard work, just needs persistence and dont try to clear too fast. In the end, we gain about 1/4 acre more to enjoy.

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