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Godless in the garden

Welcome to gardeners, growers of veggies, fruits, flowers, and trees!  

 

Welcome  backyard hen enthusiasts, worm farmers, beekeepers & composters!

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 179
Latest Activity: 11 hours ago

Welcome to Eden!

If you like to dig in the dirt, plant & prune, grow food & flowers, or sit and watch as someone else does your landscaping, you'll find something here to discuss!

Selected topics, in sort of alphabetical order:
Aging.  Gardening with an older body.
bees.  insectary.  insectsbee gardening. Beneficial insects.  insects drive evolution

Compost.  herecontaminated compost.

Backyard Chickens here. here. here. here.

Edible yard.  here  urban farmfront yards.
Growing Fruits

Folklore.

Fragrance and Scenthere.
Fruit growing.  in a small space, by backyard orchard culture.
Frugal gardening.  labels.

Gardening for future generations.  also permaculture, trees, historic varieties, soil

Hegelkultur here, here, here

Heritage and historic varieties.   heresources

locally grown plants to prevent blight transmission here.

Moon Phase Widget here. Moon phase topic here.

PeppersHot peppers.

Permaculture MollisonFalk  Liu, Joan's IntroTransformation in 90 days, Perm Principles at work. Food forest, Holzer

Potatoes.  here.

Rooftop gardening.  here

Seed starting. starting spring crops.

Scientific Gardening.   The Informed Gardener.  The truth about garden remedies.

Soil and soil building - healthy soil microbes, mycelium, dirt is everything, soil analysissoil pH.
Squirrels.

Synergies.

Tomatoes.  Myths and truths

Trees.  Tree tunnels.  Ancient tree planting. Plant commemorative trees

Comment Wall

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Comment by Idaho Spud on January 11, 2016 at 3:37pm

Thanks Bertold.  And, thank you all for your concern.  That's what I meant in my first post, but after reading it again, it could be interpreted that I was only thanking Joan.

Comment by Idaho Spud on January 11, 2016 at 3:28pm

December has been colder than normal.  Got down to negative 10° F one morning, but temperatures are back to normal, or above now.  The high temps are going to rise above freezing this week.

Comment by Bertold Brautigan on January 11, 2016 at 3:22pm

Spud, great to hear from you again. Happy new year and I hope all's well with you.

Comment by Joan Denoo on January 11, 2016 at 2:56pm

Spud, I am so glad to read your comment today! I understand your struggle to make contact and in no way scold you for that. I m just relieved you did not get hit by a huge truck and turn into compost! 

What has your winter been treating you? 

We had a lovely snowfall that regenerated the water storage in the mountains. We now experience a thaw that is a little too fast. We may have some flooding. I hope the temperatures drop just a little until the soils begin to soften and then give us a nice, slow snow melt. Wishing is the best I can do to control the weather. Whatever comes, comes. 

Take good care, Spud. I/we miss you. 

Comment by Idaho Spud on January 11, 2016 at 2:45pm

Hello all.  Thanks for the concern, and your messages Joan.   I've only been going to the library for internet access about once per week for 3 hours.  Only enough time to pay my bills, buy some things I want, and look for some information I want.

The van is not a good place to do my inter-netting in the winter.  It's either too cold, or, when the sun in out, too hot on my head and too cold on my feet.

With my little bit of germaphobia, I've stopped using the library's chairs & computers, and it's a pain to carry a folding chair, folding table, and my 20 pound computer up the stairs to the adult section, but I may go back to doing that.

Sorry to hear about Barbara.

I've been enjoying eating on my large harvest of squash.

Comment by Joan Denoo on January 11, 2016 at 1:28pm

I sent Spud several messages and have heard nothing. I have no idea who in Pocatello, ID, to contact.  

I did get a response from Barbara and she was so discouraged with the gardening experience, she tore up the hugelkulture and other wonderful projects she created hoping to be able to eat from her garden. She put so much energy into the effort she simply gave up. She has a trip planned to visit Ireland very soon. That lovely country, situated so far north, will not inspire her to go back to San Antonio, TX, and try again. 

Perhaps she will make a trip to the Mediterranean and see the lovely gardens that grow in that area. 

I encouraged Barbara to write a comment to the group.

Comment by Plinius on January 11, 2016 at 4:31am

Spud hasn't posted since Dec 3. Does anyone know anything?

Comment by Joan Denoo on January 11, 2016 at 3:29am

Daniel, this corn, Painted mountain corn, looks like an interesting plant to grow in our cold northern garden. The kids will enjoy it and from what I read, it is delicious. I like your idea for growing it for the chickens. I'll talk to Katelynn, my great-granddaughter, to see if she wants to try a patch in her garden. There are lots of seed companies listed as sellers. Do you have a favorite company to recommend? I received a Territorial Seed Co catalogue this week and it is overwhelming with the varieties of seeds they have for sale. 

The seed catalogues started arriving and I'm having a great time exploring them. 

 Painted mountain corn

Comment by Daniel Wachenheim on January 10, 2016 at 8:56pm

Joan, I thought you might be curious about this open-pollinated, north and cold tolerant, short season, early ripening flint corn.  Painted mountain corn.

According to the website, this corn was a do-it-yourself progect lasting 30 years.   Developed from multiple varieties of Native American flint corn.   Not a commercial hybrid, not GMO, not inbred.

I am going to try just for fun.  If it grows and develops, the plan is to use for chicken feed and/or cornmeal and/or decoration.

The other one I want to try, more for corn flour, is Dakota Ivory.   Seeds from the Northern part of Maine.  I have plans for learning  how to cook Tamales, after I am freed from the shackles of corporate life.

It will take some planning to keep these and the sweet corn separated so they don't pollinize each other, but I think I can do it. 

Comment by Daniel Wachenheim on January 5, 2016 at 12:59pm

Update on the palm from 2,000 year old seed.   The first Judean palm, grown in 2,000 years, came from a seed found in a Jar on the Masada archeological site.  The seeds were kept dry by the climate, too dry to make them moldy or degrade.  A researcher attempted to sprout a few seeds and one grew.  That tree was named "Methuselah".

I was wondering what happened.  According to this article. the palm is male, has been used to pollenize a related species of palm - so those seeds would be 1/2 Judean palm.  I though if someone lived long enough, they could grow the hybrids to  bearing age and if fertile, back cross to Methuselah to create 75% Judean palm, then repeat for 87.5%.

It turns out, she has some newer plants from ancient seeds, that are female.  So within a lifetime, maybe have pure Judean palm dates.  very cool..

 

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