Godless in the garden


Godless in the garden

Welcome to gardeners, growers of veggies, fruits, flowers, and trees!  


Welcome  backyard hen enthusiasts, worm farmers, beekeepers & composters!

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 175
Latest Activity: 12 hours ago

Welcome to Eden!

If you like to dig in the dirt, plant & prune, grow food & flowers, or sit and watch as someone else does your landscaping, you'll find something here to discuss!

Selected topics, in sort of alphabetical order:
Aging.  Gardening with an older body.
bees.  insectary.  insectsbee gardening. Beneficial insects.  insects drive evolution

Compost.  herecontaminated compost.

Backyard Chickens here. here. here. here.

Edible yard.  here  urban farmfront yards.
Growing Fruits


Fragrance and Scenthere.
Fruit growing.  in a small space, by backyard orchard culture.
Frugal gardening.  labels.

Gardening for future generations.  also permaculture, trees, historic varieties, soil

Hegelkultur here, here, here

Heritage and historic varieties.   heresources

locally grown plants to prevent blight transmission here.

Moon Phase Widget here. Moon phase topic here.

PeppersHot peppers.

Permaculture MollisonFalk  Liu, Joan's IntroTransformation in 90 days, Perm Principles at work. Food forest, Holzer

Potatoes.  here.

Rooftop gardening.  here

Seed starting. starting spring crops.

Scientific Gardening.   The Informed Gardener.  The truth about garden remedies.

Soil and soil building - healthy soil microbes, mycelium, dirt is everything, soil analysissoil pH.


Tomatoes.  Myths and truths

Trees.  Tree tunnels.  Ancient tree planting. Plant commemorative trees

Sentient Biped's Garden Blog. Happy to add a different feed if there are suggestions.

Comment Wall


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Comment by k.h. ky on February 24, 2015 at 9:55pm
Patricia, that snow looks like what hit us last week. I believe we're all tired of it. I know l am.
Comment by k.h. ky on February 24, 2015 at 9:53pm
The kudzu that was imported from Japan to stop soil erosion, caused by mining in eastern ky, is a disaster. I've seen houses that it has covered. It's reported to grow between three and four feet in twenty four hours. Japanese beatles were imported to control the kudzu. The beatles decided they prefer our native plants and we all know how well that worked out.
The article l read said kudzu would become active again aftera dormant/dead period of as long as four years. Being rid of it, or the beatles, doesn't seem like it will ever happen.
So I'm very cautious of shipping or receiving plants that aren't native to the area or passed through the correct inspections.
Comment by Daniel W on February 24, 2015 at 7:35pm
I think the big issue with transporting plant material is disease, especially what affects agriculture. A lot of catalogs have limits, such as no grapes going to wine states, etc. I would not want to be the source of a plant virus epidemic or insect infestation either.

The catalogs probably have their products inspected. I bought an apple tree from Starks in Missouri - the package had multiple inspection stickers.
Comment by Joan Denoo on February 24, 2015 at 4:53pm
Comment by k.h. ky on February 24, 2015 at 4:36pm
Thanks Spud. You're welcome Daniel.

I know some plants are considered nuisance plants and it varies from state to state. Wisteria is in several states. Ky isn't one of them and that stuff goes wild if it's not pruned back harshly every year. I've been trying to cut it away from a friends porch for ten years now. It's gone up the walls and grown under the gutters and into the eaves. It may take dynamite to get rid of it. Lol
Comment by Idaho Spud on February 24, 2015 at 11:35am

I don't know how true it is, but this site says that the legality of taking plants across state lines depends on the state and should be researched before doing it:


I've found it difficult to find good information.  I've been unable to find anything governing private individuals mailing a plant to Idaho.   Most articles just talked about the strict laws concerning marijuana, even though I didn't use that word in my searches.

Comment by Daniel W on February 24, 2015 at 10:49am


I have been trying to figure out the legality of mailing plants and plant materials to other states.  I was on a fig website where people exchange cuttings as a major part of the website.  Not long ago I posted a question, is this legal?  The answer was very confusing.  It is definitely not legal internationally, but between states is more confusing.  I have reached the point where I think it's better not to.  That is a new change for me and I don't really know the answer for certain.  But thank you very much for the offer.

Comment by k.h. ky on February 24, 2015 at 10:41am
And sending a butterfly root won't be a problem, again if it's legal, if mine made it through the winter. There were dozens coming up around the mother plants and I sewed some of the wild seed and they had started. I seem to have a knack for starting plants. Keeping them alive past the third year is my problem.
Comment by k.h. ky on February 24, 2015 at 10:34am
Daniel, if I have any luck with the Joe Pye l may be able to send you a root start in the mail. If it's legal. It grows like weeds around here in summer. It's every place. The only place I don't see it is in heavy shade. I wait till after a rain when the ground is soft, spray bug spray all over my old clothes, wear heavy boots with the work pants tucked into the boot, and dig plants out. Have to watch for snakes and check for ticks afterwards. It's my idea of fun. Lol The difference between the wild ones I've transplanted and the tame ones I've bought is astonishing. The wild ones are much healthier and the color is so much brighter.
There's a lot of ifs in this plan but it's worth a try should it work. You could get some excellent starts for nothing but the time I'm going to be putting in trying to get some for myself.
Comment by Daniel W on February 24, 2015 at 8:02am
Kathy I've also been thinking about butterfly weed becsuse for the same reasons. In 2012 I grew some I bought as plants. Very nice. The related plant I eoukd like to try is milkweed, if I find some seeds. Perennials take a lot of patience from seed so I only start a few types a year. Last year's hollyhocks and columbines have strong growth now, and the oriental poppies I started from divisions of an old plant, look strong. So I feel like I'm up for a few more.

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