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Godless in the garden

Welcome to gardeners, growers of veggies, fruits, flowers, and trees!  

 

Welcome  backyard hen enthusiasts, worm farmers, beekeepers & composters!

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 179
Latest Activity: 20 hours ago

Welcome to Eden!

If you like to dig in the dirt, plant & prune, grow food & flowers, or sit and watch as someone else does your landscaping, you'll find something here to discuss!

Selected topics, in sort of alphabetical order:
Aging.  Gardening with an older body.
bees.  insectary.  insectsbee gardening. Beneficial insects.  insects drive evolution

Compost.  herecontaminated compost.

Backyard Chickens here. here. here. here.

Edible yard.  here  urban farmfront yards.
Growing Fruits

Folklore.

Fragrance and Scenthere.
Fruit growing.  in a small space, by backyard orchard culture.
Frugal gardening.  labels.

Gardening for future generations.  also permaculture, trees, historic varieties, soil

Hegelkultur here, here, here

Heritage and historic varieties.   heresources

locally grown plants to prevent blight transmission here.

Moon Phase Widget here. Moon phase topic here.

PeppersHot peppers.

Permaculture MollisonFalk  Liu, Joan's IntroTransformation in 90 days, Perm Principles at work. Food forest, Holzer

Potatoes.  here.

Rooftop gardening.  here

Seed starting. starting spring crops.

Scientific Gardening.   The Informed Gardener.  The truth about garden remedies.

Soil and soil building - healthy soil microbes, mycelium, dirt is everything, soil analysissoil pH.
Squirrels.

Synergies.

Tomatoes.  Myths and truths

Trees.  Tree tunnels.  Ancient tree planting. Plant commemorative trees

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Comment by Daniel Wachenheim on November 15, 2016 at 9:31am

I bet NIng will like the pickled turnips.  He likes sour foods.

Comment by Daniel Wachenheim on November 15, 2016 at 9:30am

Joan and Chris, thank you for the turnip recipes.  I will try both the fries and the slaw.  There are lots of turnips right now in the kitchen garden.  I bet those recipes would also work for the Chinese radishes, which have similar size and a mildly peppery flavor.

Chris, are big radishes used in Europe?  I read about large German radishes.  I get the feeling they have fallen out if favor, if they ever were grown.  They would seem perfect for the Northern Europe climate.  In my garden, they were a perfect thing to plant where I dug up onions, garlic, and potatoes, mid summer. 

I love shredded foods like slaw and hash browns.  I watch carefully, because if you are shredding potatoes, they should be white, not pink or red.  Pink or red indicates the fingers got too close :-)

Kathy, I have a couple of Lilac trees too.  You cant reach the top flowers to see them close or smell them.  I agree it's better to lose a year than to never have them close.  My biggest one produced a nice off-shoot this year, which I transplanted to start another bush.  Thank you lilac bush!

Comment by Plinius on November 15, 2016 at 8:24am

I made this with the big yellow turnips with the purplish skin - I'm not a turnip fan but this made a very good meal.

Cut the turnips to the size of French fries and put oil and butter in the wok. Stir-fry the turnip on maximum heat until brown tiger stripes appear. Lower the heat and add 100 grams of hazel nuts, black pepper and a teaspoon of thyme. Stir-fry some four minutes longer, sprinkle with a handful of grated Parmigiano Reggiano or other cheese, and serve with brown rice.

Comment by Randall Smith on November 15, 2016 at 6:55am
Looks like Joan has the turnip issue covered. I've never been a fan of them. I did enjoy reading about them in the classic "Tobacco Road" book!
Comment by Joan Denoo on November 15, 2016 at 12:11am

Yes, Kathy, I would agree that a trim of the top would be appropriate, just realize you will lose one year of blossoms. In the future, you will have a nicely shaped lilac and not have to worry about breaking limbs. If you do want to prune it in the future, do it when you are cutting out the fading blossoms. 

Comment by k.h. ky on November 14, 2016 at 9:27pm
Thanks Joan and Daniel. I know I'll miss a years blooms but one of them has grown over twelve ft tall. It's full and bushey at the top but the base is rather narrow. If I don't prune it back this year I'm afraid it will break under the weight of the next blooms. I figured it's better to do it while it's dormant. Ive never seen ome grow so top heavy before. Its not making new shoots at the bottom. I have three others that I've decided to leave alone.
Comment by Joan Denoo on November 14, 2016 at 7:26pm

The picked turnip recipe is in Epicurious, too; there are many recipes there and I have not tried tem. These two recipes are basically from my Grandma.

There are many more in Epicurious: 

Turnips

Grandma also made a turnip slaw, just as you would make Cole slaw. It was something like this:


TOTAL TIME: Prep: 10 min. + chilling
MAKES: 4 servings

Turnip Slaw 

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup chopped sweet red pepper
  • 1/4 cup thinly sliced green onions
  • 1/4 cup mayonnaise
  • 1 tablespoon vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
  • 4 cups shredded peeled turnips

Directions

  1. In a bowl, combine all ingredients except turnips. Pour over turnips and toss well to coat. Refrigerate several hours for flavors to blend. Yield: 4 servings.
Comment by Bertold Brautigan on November 14, 2016 at 6:58pm

That sounds great, Joan. I love leeks and cannellinis are my favorite bean.

Comment by Joan Denoo on November 14, 2016 at 6:47pm

This is from Epicurious and is similar to Grandma Whitehead's recipe. 

http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/leek-and-cannellini-be...

Leek and Cannellini Bean Soup

ANGELO ACQUISTALAURIE ANNE VANDERMOLEN NOVEMBER 2015 THE MEDITERRANEAN FAMILY TABLE

Yield4 servings

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 cups chopped leeks
  • 1 cup chopped carrots
  • 1 cup chopped celery
  • 1 cup diced turnip
  • 1/2 tablespoon salt
  • 6 cups chicken stock or water
  • 1 1/2 (14-to 16-ounce) cans cannellini beans, drained and rinsed (about 2 1/2 cups)
  • 1/4 cup grated Parmigiano cheese

Preparation

  • 1. In a large pot, put 1/4 cup of the oil over high heat and heat until it shimmers. Add the leeks and sauté for 2 minutes.
  • 2. Add the carrots, celery, turnip, and salt and cook for another 2 minutes. Add the chicken stock and bring the soup to a boil. Lower the heat, cover the pot, and simmer for 20 minutes.
  • 3. Add the cannellini beans and simmer for another 2 minutes.
  • 4. Ladle the soup into bowls. Sprinkle each portion with cheese and drizzle with a tablespoon of olive oil.
Comment by Joan Denoo on November 14, 2016 at 6:02pm

Daniel, turnips are a delicious vegetable, especially in the early summer when I pull up one, wash it off and take slices with my trustworthy shielded knife and a sprinkle of salt from a shaker I keep for that purpose. I take a small bucket of water from the kitchen faucet so I know it is slug free. 

This recipe comes from my Grandma Whitehead

Turnips, pickled: 

YIELD:  Makes 1 quart

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 small red beet, trimmed, peeled, quartered
  • 1 red chile (such as Fresno),halved lengthwise (optional)
  • 1 pound small turnips, trimmed, peeled, quartered
  • 1/2 cup red wine vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon sugar

PREPARATION

  • Combine beet, chile (if using), and turnips in a 1-quart heatproof jar or container.
  • Bring vinegar, salt, sugar, and 1 1/2 cups water to a boil in a medium saucepan, stirring occasionally to dissolve sugar.
  • Pour pickling liquid over turnip mixture and let cool. Cover and chill at least 1 week before using.
  • Do ahead: Turnip mixture can be pickled 4 weeks ahead. Keep chilled.

 

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