Godless in the garden

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Godless in the garden

Discussing all aspect of gardening.

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Comment by kathy: ky on March 24, 2017 at 12:56pm
Joan, we've been zone 7 for as long as I can remember. As for planting I've gone away from annuals and stay with perennials now. Even those are a lot of work with the weeding, thinning, pruning and mulching.
Almost everything blooms several weeks to early only to be bitten off by a sudden freeze.
We've had practically no winter this year. Our temps didn't drop to the upper teens until the first week of March. Then they went back to the mid forties for a low. We're having tornadoes in the dead of winter. And to much rain. We didn't have any snow this year. Last year we had 25" in a twelve hour span.
Our summer temps are getting in the upper 90/100 plus range.
With weather like this it's hard to plan on planting anything and getting a good outcome.
Comment by Randall Smith on March 24, 2017 at 7:12am

Thanks, Daniel.

Since I couldn't find a plum tree locally, I ordered one, plus a pecan and a golgi bush. With shipping (like $28!), the three "trees" cost well over $100 (a birthday present to myself.). And unlike my storebought trees, they come bare root. I usually don't have as much luck with bare root.

I'm hoping both the pecan and plum are self pollinating, although I have a "scrub" plum in my yard and a neighbor 1/4 mile away that has two pecans.

I've had one golgi bush die several years ago, so I was hesitant to try another. If any of these trees ever produce fruit, along with my 10-15 other fruit trees, how in the world am I ever going to eat it all?!!! I guess I can give it to my farm kids to sell.

Comment by Idaho Spud on March 24, 2017 at 7:11am

Randy, I was also surprised with the size of your new trees.

Comment by Joan Denoo on March 23, 2017 at 11:50pm

Kathy, what was your USDA growing zone before the rezoning?

One thing we know for sure about climate change is that nothing is normal, everything changes and into unexpected ways. For example, the jet stream is way off its normal path. That simple fact is that everything else changes. 

Our part of the country isn't having the serious storms that other parts experience. That doesn't mean we will not have some very extreme temperature, up or down, it just means we haven't had them yet.

Given the changes in your weather patterns, what are you planting and how are they doing? 

I am really nervous to trust our new zone 5 changing to zone 6. I am still planting as though a freeze will catch us off-guard. The round in the garden is still frozen an inch or two below the surface and I will wait until the top six inches are warm enough for the planting of seeds. 

Seeds sprout in the greenhouse beautifully, but I keep a close eye on the night temperatures. 

Comment by kathy: ky on March 23, 2017 at 10:31pm
Talk about unpredictable growing conditions. Our part of Ky has been rezoned to a 6b. That explains my planting times being crazy.
One day last week we hit 80°. Crazy for mid March. Now we're back down to the low mid fifties. Bees are coming out and dying :(
Comment by Randall Smith on March 23, 2017 at 7:37am

Well, whatever "manzano" is, I'll eagerly anticipate the bearing of fruit. I like puzzles.

Daniel, I learned to graft in a botany class at IU. I tried it later and was successful on a 3 for 1 pear tree long ago (and far away). I think I remember how to do it, and may try it on my new pear tree. You recommend waiting a year, eh? My new trees are about 10 feet tall. 

I bought a "yellow delicious" apple tree yest. I went to 3 different places looking for a plum, but all 3 strores/greenhouses had only pear, apple, and cherry. I don't ever want another cherry tree.

Comment by Joan Denoo on March 22, 2017 at 5:23pm

according to Collins dictionary, manzano=apple tree in English

Comment by Randall Smith on March 22, 2017 at 7:41am
I think I'm going to regret buying the two trees I bought yest. One was called Monzano Apple. I googled it and found nothing. Pretty pink blossoms, however. The pear tree is a "Moonglow". It didn't say anything about needing a pollinater, but it does. I do have two othe pear trees. However, they are 50 yards away and away from prevailing westerlies. I think I'll need a little luck with the wind. What I liked about the tree was that the fruit (if ever) comes early. Well, we'll see.
2-3 more trees to find.
Comment by Joan Denoo on March 21, 2017 at 6:20pm

I like Spring Equinox because it designated equal daylight and darkness of our days. At the Vernal Equinox, the Sun crosses the celestial equator on its way north along the ecliptic. The days start getting longer. More daylight means warmer days and nights, the beginning of the growing season, and I had better be sure everything is ready to go into the ground when the soil get warm enough. 

With climate change, we have to pay attention to the weather and what happens. If we have a change of weather patterns everything changes. 

Meteorologically, in the Northern Hemisphere, the official Spring season always begins on March 1 and continues through May 31. Summer begins on June 1; autumn, September 1; and winter, December 1.

The Old Farmer's Almanac

SPRING EQUINOX 2017: FIRST DAY OF SPRING

Comment by Idaho Spud on March 21, 2017 at 12:26pm

Years ago, I planted some things early and the same things late.  The ones I planted late always did better than the early.

 

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