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Hang With Friends

Location: Earth
Members: 880
Latest Activity: 12 hours ago

Come on in, pull up a chair!

Picture yourself spending some time with congenial friends, sharing your lives and pictures from your cell phones." They're curious about that cool game, song, movie, camping trip, art show, or other event that fascinated you. You talk about all kinds of stuff, poetry, styles, personal achievements, relationships, and bad days. You can share your inner child, and laugh together. They sympathetically listen to your feelings about serious topics like politics or climate change, even when they don't agree.

Personal validation comes from paying attention to one another, giving more than you get. Everyone respects you and themselves, despite our amazing range of personal tastes and interests. They'll tell you they don't agree with an idea or behavior without implying you're a bad person or somehow deficient. It's an "I'm OK, You're OK" kind of fellowship, where nobody tries to make himself look better by picking on somebody else.

Nobody here is into mind games. A discussion started with a loaded guilt-throwing question will be deleted.

This group is not intended to compete with other groups on topics they cover but to "fill in the cracks." Whenever a discussion dwells at length on a topic for which there's an existing group, we urge you to provide members a link to that group to continue along their tangent.

A comment is a shout-out, which will get lost in a few days, because the comment wall is just a random stack.

Please start a discussion to share stories, photos, and videos. Replies will pop up in your "latest activity" and a conversation can develop from the feelings and thoughts you contributed. Groups are built on discussions.

Discussion Forum

concealing abuse (TheraminTrees)

Started by Loren Miller. Last reply by Ruth Anthony-Gardner on Sunday. 3 Replies

We think of institutionalized child abuse and for many of us, the natural reaction is to think of the Catholic Church. Certainly, their guilt is beyond question, even as the headlines of the Boston Globe early in 2002 and the more recent news…Continue

Tags: Children of God, Jehovah's Witnesses, David Berg, child abuse, TheraminTrees

Liberal Redneck - Climate Change the Game (Trae Crowder)

Started by Loren Miller. Last reply by Ruth Anthony-Gardner on Friday. 2 Replies

Trae Crowder isn't just about atheism.  He has a deep and abiding concern about what's going on with this planet's climate and the all-too-probable catastrophe we face from a fundamental change in weather patterns.  That said, Trae is thinking about…Continue

Tags: climate change, Al Gore, Trae Crowder

Men who challenge men to stop violence

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Grinning Cat Aug 27. 20 Replies

Many men join in the effort to reduce violence against women and children and other men. He speaks of the need to place responsibility on men instead of focusing on women to stop violence. He offers a breath of fresh air, as do so many of the men on…Continue

CBS News Treats Uri Geller as Actual ESP Talent?

Started by Loren Miller. Last reply by Joan Denoo Aug 25. 1 Reply

CBS Sunday Morning is beginning to piss me off.  This morning they presented a story on the US governments foray into…Continue

Tags: espionage, fraud, ESP, Uri Geller, Sunday Morning

Is Christianity Persecuted? (The Thinking Atheist)

Started by Loren Miller. Last reply by Patricia Aug 10. 7 Replies

Okay, gang ... when is the last time you saw Seth Andrews do an animated video on his YouTube channel?  Seems like donkey's years ago, don't it?  Well, apparently Jeff Sessions and his "religious liberty task force" got Seth's nelly up enough that…Continue

Tags: religious liberty task force, Donald Trump, Jeff Sessions, Seth Andrews, The Thinking Atheist

worshipping narcissists (qualiasoup & theramintrees)

Started by Loren Miller. Last reply by Ruth Anthony-Gardner Aug 4. 2 Replies

They're all around us: people who perceive the world as revolving around them and will go to considerable lengths to make it so: narcissists.  Such beings have been with humanity, I suspect, since humanity emerged from the gene pool.  Even worse,…Continue

Tags: narcissist, QualiaSoup, TheraminTrees

Comment Wall

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Comment by Randall Smith on September 19, 2014 at 7:29am

As for my two cents worth: Except for Asimov and maybe Jules Verne, I was never a Sci-fi fan. I liked "real" science. Although written in 1949, Michener's "The Fires of Spring" was an inspiration to this young teenager in about 1960. I also loved "Caravans" ('63) and "The Source" ('65). "Hawaii" long and good, but I couldn't finish "Centennial".

Bertold, I enjoyed your eclectic photos on your home page.         Joan, I'm with you--an admitted "snob". I no longer read fiction, love biographies (reading about Robert E. Lee now), science and history. Unlike you, however, I do like music (classical and jazz).        

Comment by Plinius on September 19, 2014 at 2:00am

I read the Covenant by Michener - about South Africa. A very enjoyable genre; fiction fragments against a historical background.

Comment by Joan Denoo on September 19, 2014 at 1:29am

I know, Felaine, my education is sadly lacking. I don't like fiction, don't care much for music, art shows don't appeal to me,  I don't like movies, I have no time whatsoever for games and I hate small talk. Snob is a good descriptor for me. It fits, I suppose, even though I have a few good qualities. (I'm laughing). I think we can add boring to a label for me. I don't think I disparage fiction. I just don't enjoy it. 

Anyway, I like your comment and you are probably right. 

Comment by kathy: ky on September 18, 2014 at 11:33pm
I've gotten to check out Mitchner again. I remember enjoying his books but don't remember which ones. I can read the same books and not remember how they end. Same thing with movies.
Comment by sk8eycat on September 18, 2014 at 10:51pm

I have never trusted people who disparage fiction. When I hear someone say, "Oh, I never read fiction," I hear a snob.

It's the best way to get a handle on human psychology , for one thing, and Fantasy and SF are wonderful at exploring "What IF..."  As in what if we returned to the moon and established a permanent base after the Apollo program?.  Or "What if Einstein was wrong, and we will be able to travel faster than light?"

Comment by Joan Denoo on September 18, 2014 at 10:34pm

Mindy, those Mitchner books were great! I didn't read The Source. 

Comment by Joan Denoo on September 18, 2014 at 9:51pm

Count me among the non-sci-fi enthusiasts. Fiction just holds no interest for me. I very much liked To Kill A Mockingbird, and some biographies and histories. James Mitchner held my attention because he included so many elements, including geology, history, politics, and stuff like that. 

I love the writing of Carl Sagan, Brian Greene, Jared Diamond, Brian Cox, David Suzuki. Well, it is obvious that I like science. 

Comment by Bertold Brautigan on September 18, 2014 at 8:26pm

@Nick - Back in the day, I thought Harlan Ellison was one of the finer writers in the genre. William Gibson's Neuromancer upped the ante for its time as well.

Comment by Idaho Spud on September 18, 2014 at 1:00pm

Yes, A Fall of Moondust was by Arthur C. Clarke.  I just looked-it-up on Wikipedia, Read the very condensed story, and didn't remember one bit of it.  I should read it again one day.

Comment by sk8eycat on September 18, 2014 at 12:42pm

"sci-fi" (pronounced "sigh-fie" or "skiffy") usually means "cheap Japanese monster movies."  The good stuff, beginning with Robert A. Heinlein's 1939 short story "Life-Line," is always people stories.

Lately I've been feasting on the Valdemar series by Mercedes Lackey...she's one of the few writers who uses humor to flesh out her characters...as did Heinlein.

I still haven't made up my mind about Marion Zimmer Bradley's Darkover novels; they start out as SF, but have a great deal of what I classify as fantasy (mind-reading, psi, etc.)

Anyway, SF and Fantasy (and mysteries) have been my choice of reading for entertainment since I was a teenager.  I also like biographies of famous, or interesting, atheists.  And Colleen McCullough's "Masters of Rome" series.

I haven't read any new books in about 5 years because I can't afford them, and I have no way to get to any of the local libraries.  There used to be a small branch a few blocks from my house, but they enlarged and moved it over by the airport....and didn't make the parking lot big enough.

So...I just re-read my (enormous) collection every few years.

PS: I think A Fall of Moondust was by Arthur C. Clarke.  I read a condensed Readers Digest version of that one years and years ago.

 

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