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Health & Fitness

Your body is not the temple of god, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't take care of it. Whether you're looking for tips or just encouragement, come on in. Nothing said by anyone in here should be taken as medical advice. Always consult a doctor.

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Discussion Forum

Phthalates in Air Fresheners

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner on Saturday. 0 Replies

Flu Shot Reduces Heart Attack and Stroke Risk

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner Sep 24. 0 Replies

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Comment by Joan Denoo on September 22, 2017 at 2:13pm

Regulation of food safety, pharma corporations, police action, financials of banking, saving, and investing and others have been taken away or starved for money, what else is there to do? If weakened regulators can't do the job of insuring ethical behavior, and if people, businesses, and corporations fail to have a sense of morals and ethics, then how do we get the results of Great Britain? 

Comment by Ruth Anthony-Gardner on September 22, 2017 at 1:51pm

Joan, I don't think ethics training is the issue, it's unregulated pharma corporations. If we had a system similar to Great Britain there'd be no profit incentive for this crap.

Tom Toles via GoComics.com

Comment by Joan Denoo on September 18, 2017 at 6:22pm

We need a comprehensive ethics training requirement for the producers of the product, the sales staff, the advertisers, the retail suppliers, and the public, on how to evaluate the cost/therapeutic gain ratios of each product and brand. It should be the producers who provide the needed data to make such evaluations. 

I wish I had information such as this study provides when making decisions about my chemo and Rx's; Cancer Care Northwest had charts and graphs on the walls of the options available but they did not have this type of study. The raw data confuses one because there are differences in brands even if the basic chemical is in the product. What is needed is an analysis that consumers can learn how to read.  

According to this data, almost all of the chemicals studied either had "Little or no therapeutic gain," two had "Moderate therapeutic gain," and only two had "Major therapeutic gain."

The questions are easy:

"Does the chemical and brand Rx do what it was intended to do?" "What is the side effects of each?"

The answers are difficult and require accurate data and analysis.

Comment by Ruth Anthony-Gardner on September 18, 2017 at 4:09pm

A new study showed that the most heavily promoted drugs (which translates to added costs for patients of course) were those with the least value. The relation between promotional spending on drugs and their therap...

Nearly all the money spent on promotion in each of the 3 years went to drugs with little to no therapeutic gain.

This result calls into question whether doctors should read journal advertisements or see sales representatives to acquire information about important medical therapies.

Comment by Joan Denoo on September 9, 2017 at 3:16am

How Does Cranberry Juice Prevent Urinary Tract Infections?

"The bacteria responsible for more than 95 percent of urinary tract infections are a pathogenic strain of the same E. coli bacteria found in the lower intestine. The problematic strain of E. coli carries on its surface tiny arm-like appendages called fimbriae that anchor the bacteria to the surfaces of urinary tract cells."

Comment by Idaho Spud on July 24, 2017 at 11:40am

NHS to stop paying for homeopathy, certain supplements, and many OTC drugs

NHS England has announced plans to stop paying for prescriptions for treatments that it considers "ineffective, over-priced and low value." A formal public consultation has been launched on proposed guidelines. [Items which should not routinely be prescribed in primary care: A Consultation on guidance for CCGs. NHS England, July 21, 2017] The list includes homeopathic products, glucosamine, chondroitin, herbal products, lutein, certain antioxidants, omega-3 fatty acids (some uses), gluten-free foods, and more than 3,200 nonprescription drugs.  [NHS England launches action plan to drive out wasteful and ineffec.... NHS England news release, July 21, 2017] Public comments are welcome until October 21.

Comment by Grinning Cat on July 15, 2017 at 1:03pm

(Does this belong here or over in Politics, Economics, and Religion? Yes. :-) Also relevant to Writing to Congress this coming week...)

Prescription vial with pills inside, labeled GOP HEALTH CARE, with a long foldout in tiny type: SIDE EFFECTS MAY INCLUDE: HEADACHES, HEARTBURN, DIZZINESS, DROWSINESS, BLURRED [...] DIARRHEA, HYPERVENTILATION, INDIGESTION, IRRITABILITY, RESTLESSNESS, ANXIETY, NERVOUSNESS, CONFUSION, DROOLING, LACK OF COORDINATION, MUSCLE TREMBLING, JERKING OR STIFFNESS, UNCONTROLLABLE MOVEMENTS, FAST HEARTBEAT, SLOW HEARTBEAT, SWELLING OF THE TONGUE, TROUBLE BREATHING OR SWALLOWING, CONVULSIONS, HIGH FEVER, INCREASED BLOOD PRESSURE, LOSS OF BLADDER CONTROL, PROFUSE SWEATING, MUSCLE SPASMS OR JERKING OF EXTREMITIES, SEVERE MUSCLE STIFFNESS, SUDDEN LOSS OF CONSCIOUSNESS, EXTREME FATIGUE, HIVES, WELTS, [...] STRENGTH, NAUSEA, VOMITING, BELCHING, CONSTIPATION, DRY MOUTH, LIGHTHEADEDNESS, RUNNY NOSE, SHAKING, SORE THROAT, ABDOMINAL PAIN, INSOMNIA, WEIGHT GAIN, CONGESTION, PARANOIA, HALLUCINATIONS, TREMORS, HEART FAILURE, DEATH, STROKE, [...] DRY THROAT, [...] INCREASED APPE[TITE] [...] SALIVATION [...] MUSCLE [...]

(click to enlarge)

Comment by Randall Smith on December 19, 2016 at 7:27am

Spud, most men have enlarged prostates (me included), but it's natural. As long as you can still pee and your PSA number is low, you're fine. 

The only prescribed medication (besides red yeast rice) I'm taking is Lisinopril for blood pressure. It averaged 123/79 all this past year. Dr. says stay on it. It's cheap and affective.

Comment by Plinius on December 18, 2016 at 11:28am

Good news, Randall and Spud!

Comment by Idaho Spud on December 18, 2016 at 10:33am

Randy, congratulations on having the courage to argue with your doctor.  Seems like a good idea when you have statistics to back-up your point of view.  

I've got a good doctor now.  He's the best I've ever known.  He's in a University medical center where I think he's the head doctor and teaches other doctors, so I don't feel like arguing with him much.  

I did tell him that I wanted to stop taking drugs for my enlarged prostate because my symptoms were worse when taking drugs than when not.  He didn't give his opinion, but said tell that to my Urologist and see what he said about it.

Luckily, my Urologist had just retired, so I asked my main doctor for a recommendation and I was happy with the young one he recommended.  That Urologist agreed with everything I had concluded about my prostate and questionable cancer, that I had learned mostly from the most reliable places on the internet.

So, no more drugs for me at this time.  Yay!

 

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