As it turns out, inserting a video from YouTube or elsewhere isn't all that hard.  A great number of videos posted to the internet, especially from public news sources or places like YouTube will include a "Share" option, either on the video screen itself or in the immediate vicinity.  In the case of YouTube, you'll find it immediately below the video, as shown here:



Click on "Share" and the appearance of the screen below it will shift, showing Share options.  The second of those is the Embed option.  Click on that and you will see something similar to the following:



There are some additional options you can take advantage of here, but for now, let's just get the embed code.  Hover over the blue text frame, right-mouse click and select COPY.  You now have the embed code in your clipboard.

Now it's time to go back to the post or comment where you want to insert your video.  Once there, click on the Add Video icon in the post or comment editor header:





Clicking on that icon will open the following pop-up box:



Just as the text says, paste your embed media into the box, then click OK.  A box will appear where your cursor was, representing the area of the new video, and it'll look something like the following:


Once you finish editing your post or comment and click "Add Reply" or "Add Discussion" or "Submit," the place-keeper box should be replaced by the video:




There can be sizing issues with videos, especially when they're inserted into comment boxes and ESPECIALLY when the comment is advanced in a string, and space is more limited.  We may discuss that and other issues in the comments of this post.

ENJOY!

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Loren, what is the meaning of "when the comment is advanced in a string"?

I've been wondering why I often see videos here with the right ~15% chopped off.  

I was trying to think of another way to say it ... but when you have an comment on a comment on a comment, et cetera, each successive comment moves to the right, making for a smaller space for pictures and video.  Here's the trick I use:

If I took the video at the top and loaded it up as I did in the post, it would look like this:



and obviously, it doesn't fit.  If you look at the embed code, you can see width and height information there:

iframe width="475" height="267"<br/ _origwidth="560">
What you can do is scale both parameters back to make the video fit in the frame.  Here's how I do it:

  1. Make a guesstimate of how much smaller the WIDTH of the video needs to be, since this is the important dimension.  In this case, I'm going to cut it back to 500 pixels.
  2. Divide the new width by the old one to get a ratio - 500 / 560 = .89285
  3. Multiply the height dimension by that ratio, so that the "aspect ratio" of the video remains the same: .89285 * 315 = 281.25.  Drop the decimal and just make that 281.
  4. Edit the embed parameters so that they read: iframe width="475" height="266" before embedding the code.

And the result I get is:

Something else to note: SOMETIMES (not always) the rendering engine will sense that the video is too big and automatically scale it back, so you don't have to worry about it. Matter of fact, it did so here, and I had to fool it in order to illustrate how to correct it here.

But like I said, not ALWAYS ... so this is a tip worth remembering.

Thanks.  Good to know.

Thanks, Loren, especially for the clear instructions on how to proportionately reduce the width and height of an embedded video!

Another trick: you can specify start and end points for the video.

Suppose I want to highlight a snippet from "Five More Stupid Things About Creationism", between 3:06 and 3:37.

I'll paste the embed code into the "Add Media" box, but add parameters inside the 'src' URL:

...which results in this:

I changed the embed code to:

[...iframe & stuff...] src="//www.youtube.com/embed/JZUM79BRbtY?start=186&amp;end=217" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

186 is 3:06 in seconds only (60*3 + 6), and 217 is 3:37 in seconds only.

You can specify the start point only: ... src="...whatever...?start=30"
...or the end point only: ... src="...whatever...?end=600"
&amp; gets used only when there's more than one parameter.

This makes the YouTube player put start and end brackets on the progress bar. A person can click outside the brackets (or on them) to see the entire video, but if they only hit Play, it'll show just the snippet you specified.

I can think of a couple of times when I would have liked to cut through the introduction to a video and get to the meat of the matter.  This feature is available from YouTube; I'm not certain it will work with other embeds, but you can always try!

Thanks for your comment and input, GC!

Great tutorial Loren, thanks!

Thanks that was great

OK here is trial 1. The Final American Revolution - Adam Kokesh Debates Stefan Molyneux

I'd say that gets an "A"!

OK, that worked. Thanks. 

Trial 2. is a clip of a video:

I have a MacBook Pro and it makes the size adjustment; when I put in 500 Mac puts in x 281

Now, I need to be able to start and stop the video I want to play. 

On the Mac, I place the curser at the spot to begin, but there is nothing I see to end the clip. 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S16EHfKRLfc#t=587

Ooopps it didn't work.

I moved the cursor to 9:00, selected Embed, and copied and pasted. Will this start at 9:00? Let's see 

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