LINGUAPHILES & SESQUIPEDALIANS

Information

LINGUAPHILES & SESQUIPEDALIANS

LINGUAPHILES & SESQUIPEDALIANS is a group for people who love languages, words, and grammar.

Members: 212
Latest Activity: May 22

WELCOME TO LINGUAPHILES & SESQUIPEDALIANS

LINGUAPHILES & SESQUIPEDALIANS is a group for people who love languages, words, and grammar.

The only requirement for joining this group is that you possess a modicum of interest in languages, etymology, grammar, punctuation, and pronunciation. You do not have to be erudite or scholarly; you do not have to be a linguist or grammarian. You just have to have the desire to learn new things about language, or share the knowledge you possess.

The purpose of this group will be to help us explore the diversity of language, hone our grammar and spelling skills, understand correct word usage, expand our vocabulary, explore language and word history, and find new ways to communicate.

How we talk about things is equally important as what we talk about. Language is a part of our thinking, speaking, and writing; it is mind, tongue, and hand. It is about how we relate to other people and understand the world around us. It is communication and the exchange of ideas. It is learning, empathy, history, and politics. It can persuade, disarm, conquer, cajole, unnerve, offend, shame, enrich, encourage, inspire, destroy, or sustain. It is all these things and more.

However, the emphasis of LINGUAPHILES & SESQUIPEDALIANS is not on writing and publication. If you are interested in these topics, please join the group ATHEIST WRITERS. That does not mean that you cannot ask questions about writing here, it is just that we are not trying to compete with the well-established writer's group. I simply recommend that you use your best judgment and post your discussion in the group that best fits the topic.

The focus here will obviously be on the English language, but it is not restricted to English only. Topics can include correct spelling and grammar issues, etymology, vocabulary and usage, language history and lexicography, dialects and idioms, trivia, and resources such as books and websites.


Books & DVDs:
The Adventure of English (DVD)
The Bedford Handbook
The Big Book of Beastly Mispronunciations
Eats, Shoots & Leaves
Fowler's Modern English Usage,
Globish: How the English Language Became the World's Language
Gossip, Grooming, and the Evolution of Language
Metaphors We Live By
Modern American Usage: A Guide
The Mother Tongue
The Mountain Man's Field Guide to Grammar
Origins
Philosophy in the Flesh
Speaking in Tongues: The History of Language
The Story of Human Language
The Stuff of Thought: Language as a Window into Human Nature
There's a Word for It


Other A|N groups of interest:

Nexus Book Club
Atheist Librarians
Athiest Writers


External Links:
Dictionary.com
Thesaurus.com
Reference.com
Wold Wide Words
Modern Language Association
PrefixSuffix.com
DrMardy.com
DrGrammar.org
AskOxford.com
Common Errors in English
The Global Language Monitor
Guide to Grammar and Style
The Elements of Style
How to Speak and Write Correctly
World Wide Words
Online Etymology Dictionary
The Rosetta Project
The Phrontistery
Charles Harrington Elster

Discussion Forum

Decline in writing accuracy.

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by Grinning Cat Jan 25. 100 Replies

25 Language Song

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by Chris Jan 25, 2018. 1 Reply

Language as a Tool of State Repression

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner Jan 9, 2018. 0 Replies

Fun with English adjective order

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by tom sarbeck Oct 6, 2017. 3 Replies

Eviscerating Language

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by tom sarbeck May 17, 2017. 3 Replies

Not face = universal language

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by Grinning Cat Mar 28, 2016. 1 Reply

Pronouns for Gender Fluidity

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by Kelly Jan 13, 2016. 1 Reply

Pronouns for Gender Fluidity

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner Jan 13, 2016. 0 Replies

Enlightenment words.

Started by Gerald Payne. Last reply by Plinius Sep 17, 2015. 2 Replies

Wandering Words

Started by tom sarbeck. Last reply by Grinning Cat Dec 7, 2014. 5 Replies

One Letter Words, a Dictionary

Started by tom sarbeck Aug 7, 2014. 0 Replies

Emotionally loaded vowels

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by Grinning Cat Aug 1, 2014. 1 Reply

Automatic captions and fiberglass growth factor

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by Loren Miller Feb 23, 2014. 2 Replies

Changes to word meanings.

Started by Idaho Spud. Last reply by Dogly Feb 7, 2014. 4 Replies

Typos and Other Sources of Humor

Started by Glenn Sogge. Last reply by Ruth Anthony-Gardner Nov 26, 2013. 162 Replies

Rape culture embedded in language

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by Grinning Cat Mar 8, 2013. 1 Reply

Comment Wall

Comment

You need to be a member of LINGUAPHILES & SESQUIPEDALIANS to add comments!

Comment by Grinning Cat on May 20, 2019 at 5:01pm

Revisiting the "acyrologia" comment on the previous page, it's interesting how some of the misused words are malapropisms, simply incorrect with no connection in meaning (like "flaunting of common social morays" and "people of that elk"), but others are eggcorns, substitutions that are somewhat plausible (like "upmost desire", "after all is set and done", "stings and arrows").

I was very amused to learn that eggcorns are named for "eggcorn", which someone used instead of "acorn".

Comment by Grinning Cat on May 20, 2019 at 4:44pm

Can a foreigner answer that? Absolutely! There are maybe double the number of second-language English speakers (maybe more) as there are first-language English speakers. (And as a native English speaker I feel lucky that quirks of history made "my" language so widely used.)

According to Douglas Harper's etymonline.com, "a map of the wheel-ruts of the English language", "beware" is "probably a contraction of be ware 'be wary, be careful,' from Middle English ware (adj.), from Old English wær 'prudent, aware, alert, wary'" (and it's traced further back to reconstructed Proto-Germanic and Proto-Indo-European).

Comment by Plinius on May 20, 2019 at 7:16am

Can a foreigner answer that? I learnt that 'to be aware of the dog' is to know that the animal is there, and 'to beware of the dog' means Watch out! But beware and aware must have the same root.

Comment by Randall Smith on May 20, 2019 at 6:50am

I have a question: What's the difference in "beware" and "be aware"? Like isn't "Beware of the dog" the same as "Be aware of the dog"? Just wondering.

Comment by Ruth Anthony-Gardner on April 11, 2019 at 6:20pm

I didn't understand half of your conversation, Randall and Chris. Humor deficient, I guess.

Comment by Randall Smith on April 11, 2019 at 7:26am

Thanks, Bertold. Norm Crosby it is/was.

"Received", Chris.

Comment by Chris on April 10, 2019 at 8:14am

Comment by Grinning Cat on April 2, 2019 at 2:51am

Some fishy malapropisms here:
--

It took a long time to get my family to stop exchanging worthless trinkets as presents for aniverissaries, or  other 'occations.'

The best thing I  recieved  as a  was a dictionarnary of unusual words from my brother.

Comment by Chris on April 10, 2019 at 7:51am

Metaphores and stories may by why novelists are able to tell more  about 'truth'  than non-fiction writers.

Having written that.  Truth is more interesting than fiction.

Comment by Grinning Cat on April 2, 2019 at 5:43pm

Especially if the crucifixes have been "blessed" with holy water that lots of people have put their fingers in, after using the toilet and not washing their hands thoroughly!

As for fishy puns, there's the classic Kip Addotta song "Wet Dream":

(lyrics in the description on the YouTube page)

Comment by Tom Sarbeck on April 2, 2019 at 11:48am

Crucifeces, Chris, is the plural of crucifix.

 

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