Science Fiction/Fantasy Atheists

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Science Fiction/Fantasy Atheists

Atheists enjoy speculative stories as they *should* be enjoyed: for entertainment purposes only, not to be confused with reality. Members here can have fun discussiung the literature, movies, TV, etc.

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Welcome science fiction & fantasy fans!

As a science fiction/fantasy writer myself, I enjoy taking voyages into the unknown. Looking at the universe as it isn't often helps us put the real world into perspective. It's also fun to take an occasional vacation from the often-harsh reality around us. Unlike the theists, the religionists, the god-groupies who feel compelled to live in fantasy realms, we visit them and then come back home--and then go voyaging again.

I hope you'll all feel free to congregate here and compare your experiences in other worlds and times.

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Deathsworn Arc - Atheist Fantasy Novels.

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Climate Change as a Sci-Fi film

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Comment by Hilde on February 22, 2010 at 12:08pm
Jenniffer... sorry about that, I'll try to live up to expectations next time and make sure I put on my asshat before posting. Actually, I've been pretty impressed with this site, it's much more civil than most others. Even when it's been less so, it's still not even close to a youtube level of uncivility.
Comment by Howard S. Dunn on February 22, 2010 at 10:54am
Moon was alright - but the best I've seen recently was District 9. Ironically, while Peter Jackson went to amazing lengths to give us romanticized characters, eras and visuals with LoTR and King Kong here he gives us what should become the prevailing trend - if I had my way - socially relevant use of the medium with a dash of cinema verite.

Beyond escapism, the best use of science fiction is to show the problem to those who have the problem in a way that they see the problem with out becoming defensive about it.

Enemy Mine (Dennis Quaid and Lou Gosset, Jr.) is a wonderful piece that explores racism and sexism simultaneously for the male bigot in all of us.

Oh- and I'd like to give a nod to Terry Gilliam, especially for Brazil and Time Bandits. Clearly Terry paid attention to the Grand Master - Stanley Kubrick's - work 2001 and A Clockwork Orang
Comment by Jenniffer on February 22, 2010 at 10:12am
Thanks, Hilde! As a funny aside, I think I've been on the intertubes too long. When I got the email that you had responded to the thread I was braced for an attack. How nice to have a civil, rational discussion of something. I feel guilty for letting the Digg comment threads destroy my confidence in human reason.
Comment by Hilde on February 22, 2010 at 9:59am
that's actually an interesting way of looking at it. i hadn't really viewed it in that light, i saw it more as how technology allowed them to do all of it, but i think you have a really good, interesting perspective on that.
Comment by Jenniffer on February 22, 2010 at 9:55am
The humans do use amazing technology for science and research, and that tech is inevitably shown to be pointless. They could study and research all they want, but ultimately they had to throw off the technology and "be one" with Pandora. Even though there was something actually biological going on, and not supernatural, it was wrapped up in the language of spirituality and religion, and this was shown to be the better, more authentic experience. I had fun watching Avatar, but I find that I like it a lot more when I don't think about it or analyze it, which means ultimately it isn't going to be one of my favorite movies. I much prefer speculative fiction that makes me think, and that I like more the more I think about it and analyze it. I'm not saying there isn't a place for eye candy and explosions and non-stop action, it just isn't satisfying to me long term. It's not a judgement of any innate quality of the movie, it's just my opinion and preference.
Comment by Hilde on February 22, 2010 at 9:39am
i think loren's got a point that avatar is more anti-mindless military (and maybe a bit anti-manifest destiny or something similar). while the navii are not technologically sophisticated, the humans use amazing technology for science and research, technology that is either beneficial or neutral at worst. only the military might is shown negatively and that really has more to do with why the weapons are being used than anything.
Comment by Loren Miller on February 22, 2010 at 8:50am
I think I would likely watch Moon solely for Sam Rockwell's performance. I was mightily impressed with him in The Green Mile and suspect a one-man show like Moon should be even more impressive. Of course, when I went to get it at Borders, they were out of stock! GRRRR!
Comment by Jenniffer on February 22, 2010 at 8:37am
I enjoyed Avatar as well, although it did trigger a sort of unexpected feminist rant in me. I am pretty tired of seeing women represented as more innately "spiritual" and "intuitive". It irks me. But it certainly was pretty and it was a lot of fun. I have some criticisms, but I am not anti-Avatar.
Comment by Paul Jarvis on February 22, 2010 at 8:35am
I thought Moon was fantastic. I really enjoyed that movie. It did bring Solaris to mind, but it also made me remember one of my all time favorites, Silent Running. Admittedly, Moon barely touched upon the loneliness of Silent Running, but it moved me in a similar way. Oh, and I loved Avatar! For entertainment value and eye candy if nothing else.
Comment by Jenniffer on February 22, 2010 at 8:22am
@Loren I saw "Moon" with Sam Rockwell recently, and it wasn't that bad, but much like "Solaris" it was more of a character study on the moon. But it definitely wasn't showing science or technology in a negative light, just raising some questions about human nature. But that wasn't exactly a big Hollywood blockbuster.
 

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