All things wildlife. Wildlife management, ecology, eco-tourism, research, conservation, rehabilitation, photography, etc. For anyone who enjoys wildlife.

Members: 42
Latest Activity: on Thursday

Discussion Forum

Bee Demise

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by Ruth Anthony-Gardner Sep 20. 10 Replies

If you like to eat, the plummeting bee population matters.Bees are having a really hard time right now. For about a decade, they've been dying off at an unprecedented rate—up to 30 percent per year,...... in the last few years scientists have…Continue

Tags: climate change, bees

Giraffes aren't mute, they hum

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner Sep 18. 0 Replies

Giraffes spend their evenings humming to each otherAll of my life I'd been told that giraffes were mute. Hah!Angela Stöger…Continue

Tags: humming, vocalization, communication, giraffe

Have Scientists Found the World’s Deepest Fish?

Started by Steph S. Sep 17. 0 Replies

The deep sea is a mysterious world of darkness, an inky black…Continue

Marine life slashed by half since 1970: WWF

Started by Steph S.. Last reply by Gerald Payne Sep 16. 3 Replies

Geneva (AFP) - Pollution, industrial fishing and climate change have killed off half of marine life in the last four decades, according to a WWF report released on Wednesday.Species essential to global food supply -- especially in poorer nations…Continue

New Golden Jackal species discovered

Started by Steph S. Aug 10. 0 Replies

For the first time in 150 years a new canid species has been discovered…Continue

Gibbons have been disappearing from China for centuries

Started by Steph S.. Last reply by Joan Denoo Aug 7. 1 Reply

Gibbons are rare in modern-day China. All four species found in the country…Continue

Half of Mozambique's Elephants Killed in Last Five Years

Started by John Jubinsky. Last reply by Steph S. Jul 19. 5 Replies

The Wildlife Conservation Society has reported that nearly half of Mozambique's elephants have been killed by poachers for their ivory in the last five years. Per the article: Poachers have killed nearly half of Mozambique’s elephants for their…Continue

Tags: Poaching, Animals, Wildlife, Elephants, Jubinsky

Rats Dream About the Places They Want to Explore

Started by Steph S. Jul 15. 0 Replies

Maps in the BrainScientists already knew that after a rat has…Continue

Comment Wall


You need to be a member of Wildlife to add comments!

Comment by Joan Denoo on January 20, 2013 at 10:04pm
Dominic, many of your photos of butterflies sit on plants that look very much like an Asclepias, but I don't think it grows in Florida. I could be wrong.
Asclepias tuberosa L.
Comment by Tony Carroll on January 20, 2013 at 9:42pm

Comment by Steph S. on January 20, 2013 at 12:20pm

Tony - yes, it is so the seeds are spread further (relative abundance) - the article although about another species, answers the question of the plants role of ecology in the forest.

Comment by Steph S. on January 20, 2013 at 12:17pm
Here is an article discussing the role of the species and their role in the forest.

Recent studies have demonstrated the increasingly important role of lianas (woody vines) in forest regeneration, species diversity and ecosystem-level processes, particularly in the tropics. Mechanisms responsible for the maintenance of liana species diversity could yield new insights into the maintenance of overall species diversity. Lianas contribute to forest regeneration and competition, not only by competing directly with trees, but also by differentially affecting tree species and thus changing how trees compete among themselves. In addition, they contribute considerably to ecosystem-level processes, such as whole-forest transpiration and carbon sequestration. As the rate of tropical forest disturbance increases, they are likely to increase in relative abundance throughout the tropics and the importance of lianas to many aspects of forest dynamics will grow.

The ecology of lianas and their role in forests

Trends in Ecology & Evolution, Volume 17, Issue 5, 1 May 2002, Pages 223-230

Comment by Tony Carroll on January 20, 2013 at 12:11pm

I'm thinking easier for all animals to get to, so seeds from the fruit are spread further? The article didn't say.

Comment by Ruth Anthony-Gardner on January 20, 2013 at 12:08pm

Growing fruit on the trunk, interesting. I wonder what the adaptive value might be.

Comment by Steph S. on January 20, 2013 at 11:37am

Tony that Brazilian Grape Tree is beautiful. And yes, plants are an important part of wildlife habitat. Oh that albino Beta fish is so beautiful.

So, many thanks!

I hope everyone is having a relaxing day.

Comment by Tony Carroll on January 20, 2013 at 11:21am

I know this isn't exactly wildlife, but I found it fascinating, and wanted to share. Brazilian Grape Tree (also known as Jabuticaba) does not use branches to grow fruits. It grows fruits (and flowers) directly on the trunk.


Comment by Tony Carroll on January 20, 2013 at 2:07am

Albino Betta.

Comment by Steph S. on January 19, 2013 at 10:37am

Tony I just love the horses and the very cool looking butterfly. It is really awesome that the butterfly is transparent.

Thanks very much.


Members (42)


© 2015   Atheist Nexus. All rights reserved. Admin: Richard Haynes.

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service